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I have this sample page with links that look like buttons: http://www.problemio.com/problems/problem.php?problem_id=251

Most of the link-buttons actually look nice, but the one that says "suggest a solution" is extremely wide.

It is styled like this:

a:link.image_button 
{
  display: block;
  background: #4E9CAF;
  padding: 10px;
  text-align: center;
  border-radius: 5px;
  color: white;
  font-weight: bold;
  text-decoration: none;
}

a:visited.image_button 
{
  display: block;
  background: #4E9CAF;
  padding: 10px;
  text-align: center;
  border-radius: 5px;
  color: white;
  font-weight: bold;
  text-decoration: none; 
}

and kind of an interesting thing is that if you press that button, and then press "see existing changes" button, it brings back the original button looking like it was originally meant to.

Here is the html for it:

  <div id="solution_suggestions_title">

                <center><a class="image_button" id="add_existing_suggestion" href="#" title="Click to add your ideas for solving this issue!">Suggest a Solution</a> </center>         

               <center><a class="image_button" style="display: none;" id="show_existing_suggestions" href="#">See Existing Suggestions</a></center> 
           </div>
share|improve this question
    
After you click on it and go back it gets a style of display:inline added. That's why it changes back. If you are using firefox download an addon called firebug, it can help you with CSS issues – Samjus Jan 4 '12 at 15:55
    
Or use Chrome with the builtin developer tools (F12) or even IE has it these days (also f12). Although I would be a bad person if I would suggest using IE :) – PeeHaa Jan 4 '12 at 16:02
up vote 5 down vote accepted

It is that wide because it has the property: display: block;.

If an element has display: block; it always takes the entire width of the parent container by default (unless defined otherwise).

P.S. I don't think it does look bad :P

share|improve this answer
    
Try display: inline-block; – anstosa Jan 4 '12 at 15:54

Because display: block elements expand to fit their horizontal space.

share|improve this answer

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