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In my code, i got a List of elements to loop through and calculate some values, now:

        double targetRatio = Math.min((double)w/h, (double)h/w);//height & width of the screen
        List<Size> sizes //populated with supported height and width
    double ratioArray[];
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i <= sizes.size(); i++) 
    {
        double ratio = Math.min((double)sizes.get(i).width/sizes.get(i).height, (double)sizes.get(i).height/sizes.get(i).width);
        ratioArray[i] = Math.abs(ratio - targetRatio);
        // Math.min((double)sizes.get(i).width/w, (double)w/sizes.get(i).width);
        // Math.min((double)h/sizes.get(i).height, (double)sizes.get(i).height/h);
        //sizes.get(i).width
        //sizes.get(i).height

    } 

the lower the value in ratioArray[i] the better ratio i got;now i am stuck at locating the best ratio, i can do this:

Arrays.sort(ratioArray);

but then how do i get the index back? i have to make the min value point to it's size

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Best way is to iterate through ratioArray and DO NOT use Arrays.sort(ratioArray);

double targetRatio = Math.min((double)w/h, (double)h/w);//height & width of the screen
        List<Size> sizes //populated with supported height and width
    double ratioArray[];
    int i;
    for (i = 0; i <= sizes.size(); i++) 
    {
        double ratio = Math.min((double)sizes.get(i).width/sizes.get(i).height, (double)sizes.get(i).height/sizes.get(i).width);
        ratioArray[i] = Math.abs(ratio - targetRatio);
        // Math.min((double)sizes.get(i).width/w, (double)w/sizes.get(i).width);
        // Math.min((double)h/sizes.get(i).height, (double)sizes.get(i).height/h);
        //sizes.get(i).width
        //sizes.get(i).height

    } 

After the above code put this,

        int min = ratioArray[0];
        int minindex;
        for (int i = 0; i < ratioArray.length; i++) {
            if(min > ratioArray[i]) {
 min = ratioArray[i];
                minindex = i;
            }
        }

And you will get your minindex

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Where is the reason to iterate twice instead of doing the min thing directly during computation? The only reason for this double iterating would be to keep the ratioArray for later reusing. For this approach as well as for the question itself, it is unclear, why the smallest ratio is the thing you want to get... –  fkerber Jan 4 '12 at 16:22
    
Yes it could be done during computation, but i posted this way for better understanding and simplicity ... optimization is a latter part first you need to achieve what you want .. –  King RV Jan 4 '12 at 16:28
    
Yes, this is right in general - perhaps it was the "Best" in your answer that disturbed me. –  fkerber Jan 4 '12 at 16:31
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Is there a need to compute all ratios first and then sort them? I would compute the ratio in the for loop (as you do it now) and then check, if it is better than the best computed ratio till now. If yes, store it (and its index) as bestRatio and bestRatioIndex and go on - if not, just go for the next loop. After the loop, you have the best ratio and its index in the two variables. You could even leave the loop then in-between, if you find an exact matching.

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do you mean: if(ratio[i-1] > ratio[i]){use this ratio}else {use the previous one} ? –  Tom91136 Jan 4 '12 at 16:10
    
It depends on what you want to achieve. From your post, I thought you want to find the size entry that fits best for your desired rotation, don't you? This would mean to calculate the ratio and take it, if it is closer to the target ratio than the closest ratio before. –  fkerber Jan 4 '12 at 16:15
    
so if i'm looking for a ratio that is closest to the screen(h & w), i'll be comparing ratios and find the one that has the smallest difference, so is my previous comment making sense, or is it wrong? –  Tom91136 Jan 4 '12 at 16:20
    
I think, it is wrong. Consider this concrete example: Desired ration: 0.75 Available ratios (in this order): 0.3, 0.74, 0.5, 0.8, 0.73 With your approach you would 0.73 - but 0.74 would be better. So the idea must be to always store the best ratio SO FAR and compare against it. This means, start with the first ratio (0.3) and store it as "best". Take the next one (0.74), if difference to 0.75 is smaller than difference to current best, use 0.74 as new best and go ahead, otherwise, leave old besr and go ahead. With this approach, you will find 0.74 as best ratio. –  fkerber Jan 4 '12 at 16:27
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