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I'm learning Backbone.js and got stuck on this simple example. Could you explain what's wrong with this code, that makes the alert box show up empty?

<html>
    <head>
        <script src="http://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.1/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
        <script src="http://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/underscore.js/1.2.2/underscore-min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
        <script src="http://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/backbone.js/0.5.3/backbone-min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
    </head>
    <body>
    <div id="test_div">test</div>
    <script>
        $(function() {
            TestView = Backbone.View.extend({
                tagName: "div",
                initialize: function() {
                    alert(this.$("#test_div").text());
                }
            });
            window.App = new TestView;
        });
    </script>    
    </body>
</html>
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

What are you expecting? There is no text in your div, therefore it alerts empty. If you want to see text in there you'll have to add some to this.el first.

Edit: this.$ is scoped to this.el I see that you're trying to access that. Unless you specify this.el to be body like

TestView = Backbone.View.extend({
  el: "body",
  ...

Then this.$ will work. However, you can simply omit the this and use $("#test_div").text()

share|improve this answer
    
I'm expecting to get the div's contents - "test". I tried also $(this.el).text() and $(this.el).html(), still the same. – grigy Jan 4 '12 at 16:31
    
OK. el: "body" did the job. Thanks – grigy Jan 4 '12 at 16:35
    
What confused me is that documentation says "this.el is created from the view's tagName, className, and id properties, if specified. If not, el is an empty div". So I thought if I specify the tagName the el will be initialized automatically. – grigy Jan 4 '12 at 16:42
    
It is automatically initialized to an empty div. tagName simply allows you to change what type of empty element Backbone generates for you. So you could have an empty paragraph tag as your el for instance. What connection does your View have to DOM unless you make it explicit? How would it know where to look? Personally I wouldn't use body as your el and instead wrap it in a container div or something similar. – tbranyen Jan 4 '12 at 16:45
    
Yeah, that makes sense. But what if I specify the id property, should not that make it explicit? – grigy Jan 4 '12 at 16:49

the problem is, that your your view wasn't bound to the DOM, you can specify an element when initializing your view to fix this...

<html>
    <head>
        <script src="http://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.7.1/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
        <script src="http://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/underscore.js/1.2.2/underscore-min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
        <script src="http://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/backbone.js/0.5.3/backbone-min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
    </head>
    <body>
    <div id="test_div">test</div>
    <script>
        $(function() {
            TestView = Backbone.View.extend({
                tagName: "div",
                initialize: function() {
                    alert(this.$("#test_div").text());
                }
            });
            window.App = new TestView({el: 'body'});
        });
    </script>    
    </body>
</html>

another way of doing it is specifying the el in the View itself

TestView = Backbone.View.extend({
    el: '#test_div',
    tagName: "div",
    initialize: function() {
        alert($(this.el).find('#test_div').text());
    }
});

for me views work best if you use them within their container, don't go using global selectors in jquery, always work from this.el which is the view itself. if you need to change something outside the div, take a look at raising events and catching events. But of course you are free to work the way you like.

more info on the el attribute of a view: http://documentcloud.github.com/backbone/#View-el

example on jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/saelfaer/Lp2N2/1/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I thought if tagName, className and id are specified then el will be constructed based on that. – grigy Jan 4 '12 at 16:45
    
ah correct, there are two ways, either specify the El like i did, or use the tagname but then you first need to render the view in the dom before you can do this.$('#...').text()... because your call was scoped to the el of your view, which wasn't rendered in the dom and couldn't access your div's text. – Sander Jan 4 '12 at 16:49
    
Thanks. But what do you mean by rendering a view in this case? I would think calling a constructor does that. – grigy Jan 4 '12 at 16:54
1  
no, by calling the constructor your view gets created but is is no where rendered in the DOM tree... you have to render the view in the dom somehwere, either by specifying an 'el' attribute saying what the view represents in the dom, or by creating a new element (thats what the tagname and all are for) but that new element should then be added into the DOM like $('#mypage').append(myAppView.el); in any case, there are many ways you can work, backbone only offers structure, you're free to do what you want with it. check out these tutorials for basic info: backbonetutorials.com – Sander Jan 5 '12 at 11:58
    
thanks, that makes sense now – grigy Jan 6 '12 at 11:41

When working in a view function this.$ is scoped to this.el. See this code in backbone.js where the view class is defined, this is the $ instance you're actually using :

// jQuery delegate for element lookup, scoped to DOM elements within the
// current view. This should be prefered to global lookups where possible.
$ : function(selector) {
  return (selector == null) ? $(this.el) : $(selector, this.el);
},

So this.$ is not $ as you know it when you're in a view's function. It's the equivalent of scoping $ manually like this :

var test = $("div", this.el)

To access the global $ from a view just use $. However, the scoped $ is there for a reason; separation of concerns. Your view code should only be working with the elements within it. Accessing $elements outside of a view re-introduces spaghetti code, the very thing that backbone is intended to avoid

Alternatively, you may have just misunderstood the different ways that el can be initialized. By using the tagName property in your view definition (and also by not passing el into the view constructor) you're telling backbone to create a div container for your view, which is the default tagName anyway so it's not necessary.

To make a view target a specific pre-existing element, use a selector as el in your view definition eg;

TestView = Backbone.View.extend({
    el: "#test_div",
share|improve this answer
    
thanks, this was helpful – grigy Jan 6 '12 at 11:40

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