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I have a JComboBox shown in the code below. When the program starts its actionPerformed event fires up immediately causing some null pointer exceptions so I want to start with none of the elements selected. However, for some reason it does not work (it always start with displaying "USD/TRY" whatever I do). Anyone has any idea ?

JComboBox comboBox = new JComboBox(new String[]{"USD/TRY", "EUR/TRY", "GBP/TRY"});

comboBox.setSelectedIndex(-1); // doesnt change anything
comboBox.setSelectedIndex(2); // doesnt change anything     
comboBox.setSelectedItem(null); // doesnt change anything

UPDATE: Building the combo box like below doesnt change anything either

JComboBox comboBox = new JComboBox(); 

comboBox.addItem("USD/TRY"); 
comboBox.addItem("EUR/TRY"); 
comboBox.addItem("GBP/TRY"); 

Here is the SSCCE:

public class MainFrame {

    private final JTextArea textArea = new JTextArea();
    private IExchangeSource s;

    public MainFrame(final IExchangeSource s) {
        //build gui
        final JComboBox comboBox = new JComboBox();

        comboBox.addItem("USD/TRY");
        comboBox.addItem("EUR/TRY");
        comboBox.addItem("GBP/TRY");

        comboBox.setSelectedIndex(-1); // doesnt change anything
        //comboBox.setSelectedIndex(2); // doesnt change anything


        JFrame f = new JFrame("Currency Converter");
        JPanel p = new JPanel(new BorderLayout());
        textArea.setName("textarea");
        textArea.setWrapStyleWord(true);
        textArea.setLineWrap(true);
        this.s = s;

        comboBox.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {

            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                String exchange = (String) comboBox.getSelectedItem();

                s.getData(exchange);
            }
        });

        p.add(comboBox, BorderLayout.NORTH);
        p.add(textArea, BorderLayout.CENTER);
        f.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(300, 300));
        f.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        f.pack();
        f.add(p);
        comboBox.setSelectedIndex(0);
        f.setVisible(true);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Try loading the String[] after creating the JComboBox? –  Gilbert Le Blanc Jan 4 '12 at 16:21
3  
Having the stack trace of the exception would help. How could you add an ActionListener to a combo box which hasn't been created yet? –  JB Nizet Jan 4 '12 at 16:30
2  
You cannot avoid having a value selected, but even then it's clear your problem lies somewhere else. On what does the actionPerformed handler exactly throw the exception? You should probably assign it later, when proper initialization has been done, or check inside it for the state. –  Viruzzo Jan 4 '12 at 16:32
1  
I've never had this problem. Post your SSCCE that demonstrates the problem. –  camickr Jan 4 '12 at 16:33
1  
A window builder should not change anything. There is no reason you can't build a GUI manually. In fact it is the approach I recommend since you learn Swing and not the GUI. All you have to do is read the JComboBox API and follow the link to the Swing tutorial on How to Use Combo Boxes for a working example. –  camickr Jan 4 '12 at 16:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Your (incomplete) example invokes

comboBox.setSelectedIndex(0);

right before becoming visible, canceling any previous setting. Set the desired initial index before adding the listener, and don't neglect to start on the EDT, as shown in the sscce below.

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.Dimension;
import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.event.ActionEvent;
import java.awt.event.ActionListener;
import javax.swing.JComboBox;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.JTextArea;

public class MainFrame {

    private final JTextArea textArea = new JTextArea();


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

            @Override
            public void run() {
                new MainFrame();
            }
        });
    }
    public MainFrame() {
        //build gui
        final JComboBox comboBox = new JComboBox();

        comboBox.addItem("USD/TRY");
        comboBox.addItem("EUR/TRY");
        comboBox.addItem("GBP/TRY");

        JFrame f = new JFrame("Currency Converter");
        JPanel p = new JPanel(new BorderLayout());
        textArea.setName("textarea");
        textArea.setWrapStyleWord(true);
        textArea.setLineWrap(true);

        comboBox.setSelectedIndex(-1);
        comboBox.addActionListener(new ActionListener() {

            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {
                System.out.println(comboBox.getSelectedItem() + ": " + e);
            }
        });

        p.add(comboBox, BorderLayout.NORTH);
        p.add(textArea, BorderLayout.CENTER);
        f.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        f.pack();
        f.setSize(new Dimension(300, 300));
        f.add(p);
        f.setVisible(true);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks. The other answers solved the problems to some extent but there were still some problems however this one completely managed to solve it. I think the lack of invokeLater function for building the frame (i.e: starting on the EDT) was the main problem. –  Cemre Jan 4 '12 at 19:26
    
Thanks for following up; I'm always intrigued by new ways to expose an EDT problem. –  trashgod Jan 4 '12 at 19:32
    
@Cemre, did you ever read the API and the tutorial??? The example from the tutorial uses the EDT properly, thats why I pointed you to the tutorial hours earlier. –  camickr Jan 4 '12 at 21:55
    
@camickr your link did not work for some reason so I wasnt able to check it at that time sorry about that. I will google and study it now. I am a bit new to swing so I wasnt aware of the importance of the EDT. Thanks for your help. –  Cemre Jan 5 '12 at 0:26
    
@Cemre, I didn't give you a link. I expected you to be able to read the API and click on the link yourself. If you are new to Swing then that is all the more reason to actually read the tutorial as was suggested rather than hoping someone writes the code for you. –  camickr Jan 5 '12 at 1:10

1) add ItemListener instead of ActionListener, but this ItemListener always fired twice events SELECTED and DESELECTED,

  myComboBox.addItemListener(new ItemListener() {

        @Override
        public void itemStateChanged(ItemEvent e) {
            if (e.getStateChange() == ItemEvent.SELECTED) {
                //some stuff
            }
        }
    });

2) your GUI maybe is or isn't created on EventDispashThread, but in this case doesn't matter, you have to delay this method by wraping into invokeLater(), for example

public class MainFrame {
     .
     .
     .

    f.setPreferredSize(new Dimension(300, 300));
    f.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    f.pack();
    f.add(p);
    comboBox.setSelectedIndex(0);
    f.setVisible(true);
    selectDesiredItem();
}

private void selectDesiredItem() {
  EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {

        @Override
        public void run() {
            comboBox.setSelectedIndex(-1);
        }
    });  
}

3) better would be implements AutoCompete JComboBox / JTextField for Currency Pairs

4) maybe not important but CcyPairs have got four sides by default

  • Buy BaseCcy

  • Sell BaseCcy

  • Buy VariableCcy

  • Sell VariableCcy

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for your detailed answer. I really appreciate it. Although, you second suggestion solved the combo box error, I was still getting null pointer exceptions though. –  Cemre Jan 4 '12 at 19:28
    
+1 for subject matter expertise! –  trashgod Jan 4 '12 at 19:29
    
-1 for too many random bullets - happy new year :-) –  kleopatra Jan 5 '12 at 10:45
    
@kleopatra happy new year too –  mKorbel Jan 5 '12 at 11:26

The suggestions so far are good. But sometimes, when things are really convoluted on how Components get constructed, a more direct fix is needed:

  1. subclass the JComboBox (or whatever Swing class is firing the events, JList, etc...)
  2. add a field, private boolean fireEvents = false; Consider making it volatile.
  3. override the relevant fireXXX() methods to check the status of fireEvents
  4. only set fireEvents = true after all construction and initialization is complete
  5. if a "major overhaul" is later called for, such as on loading a new file, new settings, you can set fireEvents back to false while rebuilding everything.
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer. –  Cemre Jan 4 '12 at 19:26
    
-1 when things are really convoluted it's mostly because the application code does something wrong. So instead of random indecent subclassing, whacky flags or muddying overrides, first step is to dig and understand what exactly goes wrong in the concrete context and fix that –  kleopatra Jan 5 '12 at 10:36

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