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Currently my program (see below) generates random strings (made of numbers) from 8 - 12 characters in length.

public static string GenerateNewCode(int CodeLength)
{
    string newCode = String.Empty;
    int seed = unchecked(DateTime.Now.Ticks.GetHashCode());
    Random random = new Random(seed);

    // keep going until we find a unique code       `
    do
    {
        newCode = random.Next(Convert.ToInt32(Math.Pow(10, CodeLength - 1)), Convert.ToInt32(Math.Pow(10, CodeLength) - 1)).ToString("0000");
    }
    while (!ConsumerCode.isUnique(newCode));

    // return
    return newCode;
}

However, their is a problem with the method, when the codeLength is 10 or greater it causes error because 109 is greater than int32.MaxValue.

Not sure how to get around this issue.

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4  
Are you trying to generate a string or a number? If you're generating a string just generate N random digits (0-9) and concatenate them. If you're trying to generate a number can you use Int64? –  D Stanley Jan 4 '12 at 16:48
    
I return a string however, Random.Next requires two integers to work properly. Also surely the way I am doing it is more random then 'X' concatenated 0 - 9 values? –  swade1987 Jan 4 '12 at 16:50
4  
I don't understand what you mean by "more random". You have a hundred-sided die; you roll it and get a number from 0 to 99. Or, you have a blue ten-sided die and a green ten-sided die. You get a blue number from 0 to 9 and a green number from 0 to 9, multiply the blue number by ten, and add it to the green number to get a number from 0 to 99. Your statement is that one of those is "more random" than the other. Please to explain why. –  Eric Lippert Jan 4 '12 at 16:54
1  
@DrAndrewBurnettThompson: That is a terrible idea and you should under no circumstances ever do that. GUIDs are not guaranteed to be random and no proper subset of the bits of a GUID is guaranteed to be unique. Taking bits out of a GUID and expecting the bits to have the properties of a GUID is like taking the rudder off a plane and expecting the rudder to fly. Never ever ever do that. Use tools for the purpose they were designed for. GUIDs were designed to provide globally unique identifiers, so use them for nothing else. –  Eric Lippert Jan 4 '12 at 16:56
3  
OT: int seed = unchecked(DateTime.Now.Ticks.GetHashCode()); is nonsense. Just use random = new Random(); –  Henk Holterman Jan 4 '12 at 16:58
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5 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code doing the same thing without some freak lines:

public static string GenerateNewCode(int CodeLength)
{
    Random random = new Random();
    do
    {
        StringBuilder output = new StringBuilder();

        for (int i = 0; i < CodeLength; i++)
        {
            output.Append(random.Next(0, 9));
        }
    }
    while (!ConsumerCode.isUnique(output.ToString()));
    return output.ToString();
}
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Rather than generating a number from 0 to 10n-1 and then converting it to string, generate n numbers from 0 to 9, convert each one to a string, and concatenate them together.

I note that this technique yields numbers in the range (say for n = 4) 0 to 9999; your original version yielded numbers from 1000 to 9999. You could generate the first digit from 1 to 9 instead of 0 to 9 if you wanted to preserve that property.

Surely the way I am doing it is more random then 'n' concatenated 0 - 9 values.

Please explain why you believe that. I am fascinated to learn why people believe falsehoods.

Could you not create a Guid.NewGuid().Tostring() and truncate the most significant characters to get a random string of length N?

You could but you should not. GUIDs are not guaranteed to be random and no proper subset of the bits of a GUID is guaranteed to be unique. Taking bits out of a GUID and expecting the bits to have the properties of a GUID is like taking the rudder off a plane and expecting the rudder to fly. Never ever ever do that.

Rather, use tools for the purpose they were designed for. GUIDs were designed to provide globally unique identifiers, so use them for nothing else.

A question you did not ask but probably should:

What else is wrong or suspicious with my code?

int seed = unchecked(DateTime.Now.Ticks.GetHashCode()); 

What on earth is that code doing? First off, the random class already uses the current time as a seed; this is unnecessary. Second, what on earth is the purpose of an "unchecked arithmetic" expression that contains no arithmetic? Third, why would you get the hash code? You are not balancing a hash table!

Random random = new Random(seed);  

If this method is called twice in the same tick then the seed will be the same, and therefore the sequence of random numbers will be the same, which means that you will potentially wait a long time because every generated number will be a collision in your 'unique' set.

A better technique is to make a static instance of Random, seeded once. If your program is single-threaded then that's no problem. If it is multi-threaded, make sure you don't access the Random from multiple threads; it is not thread safe and its thread safety violation failure mode is not good.

   newCode = random.Next(Convert.ToInt32(Math.Pow(10, CodeLength - 1)),                         Convert.ToInt32(Math.Pow(10, CodeLength) - 

Is it really necessary to work out the power twice per loop, when it is exactly the same every time? Work it out once before the loop begins. The code will be shorter, clearer and faster.

while (!ConsumerCode.isUnique(newCode));    

If the collection is full, this loops forever. If the collection is almost full then this loops for a long time. This is a potentially bad technique for generating unique random numbers in a range. Only do this if you know ahead of time that the number of possibly generated numbers is far, far larger than the maximum size of the collection.

So what would your method look like for this functionality?

I would be inclined to do something like this. First, I'd like an infinite supply of digits:

// Yield an infinite sequence of pseudo-random digits 0-9
// This method is not thread-safe.
private static Random random = new Random();
static IEnumerable<int> Digits()
{
    while(true)
        yield return random.Next(0, 10);
}

Now I can generate a unique string of digits:

// Generates a random code of given length. If it is not
// in the set, adds it and returns the code. If it is
// already in the set, tries again. 
static string AddUniqueCode(int length, HashSet<string> set)
{
    while(true)
    {
        string code = string.Join(null, Digits().Take(length));
        if (set.Add(code))
            return code;
    }
}    

I like my methods short.

You could also make the Digits method use crypto-strength randomness instead of pseudo-randomness if unpredictability is important to you. pseudo-random numbers are easy to predict.

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So Eric, many thanks for the feedback its much appreciated. So what would your method look like for this functionality? –  swade1987 Jan 4 '12 at 17:26
    
Jon Skeet has a nice article/code sample to handle multi-threaded randomness. –  Brian Jan 4 '12 at 17:30
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Generate a random number from 0 to 9; add '0' to it; cast it to a char; now you have a random digit. Repeat for as many digits as you need.

Like this: char c = (char)(random.Next(10) + '0');

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1  
Mike, could you please write this as I am not sure what you mean? –  swade1987 Jan 4 '12 at 16:51
1  
The calculation for char c that I have already written above gives you a character containing a random digit. Don't you know how to write a loop which constructs a string out of characters? –  Mike Nakis Jan 4 '12 at 16:59
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One method you could use Random.NextDouble() to return a number between 0..1, then scale it to 0..26 and use a lookup table to return an alphabetic character based on the index. For example:

char lookup = new char[] { 'a', 'b', 'c' ... 'z' }; // ensure length 26
int index = (int)(random.NextDouble() * 25.0);
return lookup[index]

A more efficient method would involve using the ascii table to convert an integer to the desired alphanumeric character.

Best regards,

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3  
Never ever do that. Using a GUID off-label like that is a terrible idea. GUIDs are not guaranteed to be a source of randomness, and a proper subset of a GUID is not guaranteed to have any uniqueness property. –  Eric Lippert Jan 4 '12 at 17:12
    
I was mid-way through editing my answer and got called away to a meeting. Ok fair enough, don't use GUID, but the lookup table is valid. Best regards, –  Dr. ABT Jan 4 '12 at 17:19
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You can create two random numbers where the first random number has a length of 6-10 and the second random number has a length of 2. After the two numbers are generated, combine them to make a string that has a length of 8-12.

Example:

public static string GenerateNewCode(int CodeLength)
{
string newCode = String.Empty;
int seed = unchecked(DateTime.Now.Ticks.GetHashCode());
Random random = new Random(seed);

// keep going until we find a unique code       `
do
{   
// The firstPart int will be a random number that has a length of 6, 7, 8, ,9, or 10 digits
int firstPart = random.Next(100000,2147483647);

// The secondPart int will be a random number that has a length of two digits
int secondPart = random.Next(10,99);        

// Concatenate firstPart and secondPart. This will create a string that has a length of 8, 9, 10, 11, or 12 chars.
newCode = firstPart.ToString() + secondPart.ToString();

}
while (!ConsumerCode.isUnique(newCode));

// return
return newCode;
}
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the firstPart is redundant as it doesn't use the CodeLength parameter. –  swade1987 Jan 4 '12 at 17:37
    
@swade1987 I'm not clear as to what you mean by "redundant". Regardless, according to your OP, the call to your ConsumerCode.isUnique() will, assumably, validate that the GenerateNewCode() method will never return a duplicate code. So, it appears as though you are trying to find an efficient way of creating the newCode (i.e. the least amount of loops). If this is true, then my example should suffice (however, I would place the "seed" and "random" var initializers within the loop). –  Jed Jan 4 '12 at 17:48
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