Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a bunch of structs like:

struct A { ... }
struct B { ... }
struct C { ... }

I want to devise a function that can accept arrays of these structs and iterate through each element of the array and call another function like:

template <typename T>
ostream& process(ostream& os, const T* array) {
   // output each element of array to os (but how do we know the length?)
}

A a_array[10];

process(a_array);

I cannot pass in the size of the array explicitly as the process function is actually operator<<() (I just used process for demonstration purposees)

Update: I cannot use any of the std containers here. It has to be an array unfortunately!

share|improve this question
3  
Why are you not using std::vector or std::array? –  Paul Manta Jan 4 '12 at 17:08
    
@PaulManta please see update –  chriskirk Jan 4 '12 at 18:14
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Array-to-pointer decay is really, really bad.

Fortunately, C++ has array references, which know their size.

template<typename T, int N> ostream& process(ostream& os, const T (&arr)[N]) {
    // use N
}
share|improve this answer
2  
I've always seen const T (&arr)[N], but I suppose it works the same. –  zneak Jan 4 '12 at 17:06
    
I doubt it. Is this even valid? [edit: no, it's not.] –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 4 '12 at 17:08
    
I've no idea, it's been a really long time since I used that syntax. –  Puppy Jan 4 '12 at 17:09
    
I think it is advantageous to drop the const. The template will automatically make the type const if it needs to be, but if you pass in a non-const array I seem to recall it won't know how to handle it. –  CashCow Jan 4 '12 at 17:33
2  
Just a note on the approach, though: after determining the size of the array (or its iterators) the finction should delegate to another function which is independent of the size to avoid code-bloat. With C++2011 a size() function for arrays can produce a constant expression fir the size using constexpr, something not easily possible in C++2003. –  Dietmar Kühl Jan 4 '12 at 17:42
show 7 more comments

You could use a std::vector<T> instead of an simple array.

template <typename T>
ostream& process(ostream& os, const std::vector<T> &array) {
   for(std::vector<T>::const_iterator iterator = array.begin(); iterator != array.end(); ++iterator)
   {
      //...
   }
}

Or you can go the std::array way (If your compiler support it and N is constant).

template <typename T, int N>
ostream& process(ostream& os, const std::array<T, N> &array) {
   for(std::array<T, N>::const_iterator iterator = array.begin(); iterator != array.end(); ++iterator)
   {
      //...
   }
}

// Usage:
array<int, 10> test;
process(..., test);
share|improve this answer
1  
why not std::array<T, N>? The size is known and constant. –  user142019 Jan 4 '12 at 17:08
    
You are right, that is even better! –  Fox32 Jan 4 '12 at 17:08
3  
If the compiler doesn't have std::array, boost::array is always an option –  Grizzly Jan 4 '12 at 17:20
add comment

Or, a simple template bounds checked array.

template< typename T, unsigned int Size >
class Array
{
    public:

    T& operator[]( unsigned int index )
    {
       assert( index < Size );
       return mElements[ index ];
    }

    const T& operator[]( unsigned int index ) const
    {
       assert( index < Size );
       return mElements[ index ];
    }

    unsigned int Capacity() const
    {
        return Size;
    }

    private:
        T mElements[ Size ];
};

And then

template< typename T, unsigned int Size >
void Process( Array< T, Size >& array )
{
    for( unsigned int i = 0; i < Size; ++i )
    {
        //use array[i]
    }
}

And to tie it together

Array< int, 10 > array;
Process( array );

It's a bit of a roll your own solution, but it's probably roughly equivalent (although a less functional array class) to std::Array or boost

share|improve this answer
add comment

You need to use the following format for arrays:

template <typename T, size_t N>
void foo(const T (&arr)[N]) {
    ...
}

Otherwise, size information will be lost.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.