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I'm just curious about how Java actually works when it come to if statements. (Note: when I say "component" below I mean the idividual parts checked by the statement, e.g. a, b, c)

Which is more efficient in terms of calculations?

if (a && b && c) { do stuff }

or

if (a) {
  if (b) {
    if (c) {
    do stuff }
  }
}

The reason why I ask is because it's important what Java does in the first version. Does it check every single thing in the statement or does it check a and if it is false then cancel checking the rest of the statement?

If this is the case then it makes sense to put the component most likely to fail as the first component in the statement.

If the whole statement is checked every time then it makes more sense to split the components into a bunch of different statements, as in the second example.

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3  
You can easily try this out yourself. –  Howard Jan 4 '12 at 17:17
    
I guess by making a, b and c functions which print when they are called, right? –  Chro Jan 4 '12 at 17:26
2  
@Howard: I am a big advocate of trying stuff out. However, I don't think that running some code (or even looking at bytecodes) is a good way to establish whether the short-circuiting behaviour is guaranteed. For this, the Java Language Specification is the definitive resource. –  NPE Jan 4 '12 at 17:28

9 Answers 9

up vote 12 down vote accepted

In Java, && and || are guaranteed to short-circuit: the operands are evaluated left-to-right, and the evaluation stops as soon as the result is known with certainty.

From the JLS:

The && operator is like & (§15.22.2), but evaluates its right-hand operand only if the value of its left-hand operand is true. It is syntactically left-associative (it groups left-to-right).

The || operator is like | (§15.22.2), but evaluates its right-hand operand only if the value of its left-hand operand is false. It is syntactically left-associative (it groups left-to-right).

This means that the two code snippets in your question are exactly equivalent.

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for (a && b && c), the conditional "short circuits", meaning as soon as one fails, the rest are not evaluated.

However, unless getting a, b, and c is somehow expensive, this could be a case of premature optimization.

If some or all are expensive, then if you do

if (getA() && getB() && getC())...

then if getA() fails, the other methods aren't even called.

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These code snippets are completely equivalent and produce exactly the same bytecode:

0:  iload_1
1:  ifeq    20 //a == false (0)
4:  iload_2
5:  ifeq    20 //b == false (0)
8:  iload_3
9:  ifeq    20 //c == false (0)
12: //do stuff
20: return

Although the explanation is different, the code generator produces the same output. In the first case due to lazy evaluation subsequent terms aren't evaluated if previous one is false. In the second case the runtime won't go deeper if surrounding if condition is not met.

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So you're basically saying it literally doesn't matter? (except in terms of code readability) –  Chro Jan 4 '12 at 17:29
1  
@Chro: yes, in terms of performance it doesn't matter. However if the computation of e.g. a is time-consuming, consider pushing it further (or deeper) so it is more likely that it will never be evaluated. –  Tomasz Nurkiewicz Jan 4 '12 at 17:32

I was curious how the compiler would treat both cases so I compiled the following code using Java 1.6:

public class IfTest
{
    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        IfTest iffy = new IfTest();
        iffy.doit();
    }

    private void doit()
    {
        Random rand = new Random();
        boolean a = rand.nextBoolean();
        boolean b = rand.nextBoolean();
        boolean c = rand.nextBoolean();

        if (a && b && c)
        {
            System.out.println("block 1");
        }

        if (a)
        {
            if (b)
            {
                if (c)
                {
                    System.out.println("block 2");
                }
            }
        }
    }
}

...then decompiled it using Jad. Here's what the decompiler produced from the class file:

// Decompiled by Jad v1.5.8g. Copyright 2001 Pavel Kouznetsov.
// Jad home page: http://www.kpdus.com/jad.html
// Decompiler options: packimports(3) 
// Source File Name:   IfTest.java

import java.util.Random;

public class IfTest
{

    public IfTest()
    {
    }

    public static void main(String args[])
    {
        IfTest iffy = new IfTest();
        iffy.doit();
    }

    private void doit()
    {
        Random rand = new Random();
        boolean a = rand.nextBoolean();
        boolean b = rand.nextBoolean();
        boolean c = rand.nextBoolean();
        if(a && b && c)
            System.out.println("block 1");
        if(a && b && c)
            System.out.println("block 2");
    }
}

I guess it doesn't matter which way you write it.

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The best way to check this sort of thing is to look in the Java Language Specification.

In this case, you want section 15.23:

At run time, the left-hand operand expression is evaluated first; if the result has type Boolean, it is subjected to unboxing conversion (§5.1.8); if the resulting value is false, the value of the conditional-and expression is false and the right-hand operand expression is not evaluated.

So no, in the expression a && b && c, b and c are not evaluated if a evalutes to false.

Note that this isn't part of the if statement behaviour - it's part of the && operator behaviour. You can see the same effect just using the expression elsewhere:

// Still won't evaluate b and c if a is false...
boolean x = a && b && c;

(It's worth being aware of what behaviour is due to which part of the language for when you want to consult the specification.)

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In the first case, the if evaluates to false on the first encountered false condition (it short-circuits). Otherwise you would not be able to do something like:

if(a != null && a.toString().equals("b"))

without getting a NullPointerException if the second part would also be evaluated.

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Very helpful, hadn't thought about that that kind of specific case. Good example. –  Chro Jan 4 '12 at 17:24
if (a && b && c) { do stuff }

That has short circuiting. && will short-circuit if a evaluates to false, meaning rest of checking is not done.

Other than that, I think there is no difference between the two approaches.

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You mean if a evaluates to false. –  Tudor Jan 4 '12 at 17:22
    
false, surely? true implies b must also be evaluated - this is AND, not OR –  mcfinnigan Jan 4 '12 at 17:22
    
@Tudor: Yes exactly. true should go with ||. Thanks. –  Bhesh Gurung Jan 4 '12 at 17:23

This:

if (condition is met) {
       //continute to next check
           if (condition is met) {
               //continue to next check
                    if (condition is met) {
    do stuff }
  }
}

Does the same as: if (a && b && c) { do stuff }, but takes up ALOT of space. You don't really have to worry about efficiency with this particular code segment, so going with your first option is your best bet. You could also do

if (a && b){
 if (condition is met) {
        do stuff }
}
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&& and || are short-circuit logical operators. It means that in your example, if a is false, then the rest of the expression won't be evaluated.

If you want non-short-circuit logical operators, you can use & and |.

You can look at the following statement of the Java Language Specification if you need confirmation: http://java.sun.com/docs/books/jls/third_edition/html/expressions.html#15.22.2

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