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Does anyone have a suggestion regarding tidying up the following code:

/* Example code only to demonstrate the type of code my app contains and 
will contain more of */

$("#filter").click(function()
{
    if($(this).attr("value") != "" && $(this).attr("value").length > charLimit)
        filterable($(this).attr("value"))
});

$("#filter").keyup(function()
{
    if($(this).attr("value") == "" || $(this).attr("value").length <= charLimit)
    {
        $('.alphablock').show(300);
        $('.filterable a').removeClass("selected");
    }
});

$('.slidingForm fieldset').hide();

$('.slidingForm fieldset:first').find(':input:first').focus();

/* Snip More Code */

Basically I end up with lots of code for each of my elements, this is just a sea of stuff, this works, but it's only going to get larger and harder to maintain and develop for.

I know PHP well and I would usually resort to classes to keep code in maintainable blocks. But I am unsure of the best approach for jQuery and general javascript functionality which is used completely differently as it's less procedural and functions can be called at any moment depending on user interaction.

Thanks Jake

share|improve this question
    
What do you mean by tidying up? It's looks pretty tidy to me. –  Aadit M Shah Jan 4 '12 at 17:42
    
I mean, put items into a more logical order for others to follow and for myself to develop on the in the future. At the moment it's just a list of lots of selectors and their actions, but with no structure as to where to find what. Comments would help, but the answers so far are great. –  Jake N Jan 4 '12 at 20:04

7 Answers 7

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Try using one of the Javascript frameworks, like Backbone.js, AngularJS to organize code in Model-View-Controller way.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you really require to use MVC architecture for this program? There's no need for a model or a controller in the above case. JQuery is only being used for the view. –  Aadit M Shah Jan 4 '12 at 18:00
1  
There was another answer on here that referenced KnockOut Js which is also really good. That answer has disappeared, this is the next best. Thanks kaz –  Jake N Jan 5 '12 at 22:35
    
KnockoutJS is similar to Angular, but Angular looks awesome. I used it for a while and it was great. –  kaz Jan 5 '12 at 23:51

It's all pretty clean, but there are some things I have been doing lately that I would recommend:

(function($)
{    
    "use strict";

    // Variables declared here are scoped to this function, won't polute 
    // the globals.

    $(function()
    {
        // Do your work here.
    });

})(jQuery);

Enclosing your script within a function itself, allows you to declare variables that will not be created globally. If you ned to make something global, assign it to the window object:

window.something = {};

I'd also consider assigning your jquery objects to a variable, there is no point making repeat selections of the same objects, e.g. $("#filter"), $(this), etc.

The last thing would be to prefer prefixing the tag name if you are using a class selector, e.g. $("div.slidingForm") instead of $(".slidingForm"). Although you might not notice any difference on simple pages, on more complex pages where you are making a lot of selections, it is better to allow the browser to pull out a subset of elements using the native getElementsByTagName method to match the class selector on, instead of having to traverse the entire DOM.

share|improve this answer

I don't know what you mean by tidy. However, I think it's always a good idea to pass a FunctionDeclaration as arguments. Doing so has two advantages:

  1. Since JavaScript declarations are hoisted, the FunctionDeclaration can be placed at the end of the script and it can be referenced as an argument.
  2. Named Functions are always easier to debug because the stack trace will show the exact function which threw the error.

It would have written your code more along these lines:

(function () {
    /* Example code only to demonstrate the type of code my app contains and 
    will contain more of */

    var filter = $("#filter");
    filter.click(filterClick);
    filter.keyup(filterKeyup);
    $('.slidingForm fieldset').hide();
    $('.slidingForm fieldset:first').find(':input:first').focus();

    /* Snip More Code */

    function filterClick() {
        if ($(this).attr("value") !== "" && $(this).attr("value").length > charLimit) {
            filterable($(this).attr("value"));
        }
    }

    function filterKeyup() {
        if ($(this).attr("value") === "" || $(this).attr("value").length <= charLimit) {
            $('.alphablock').show(300);
            $('.filterable a').removeClass("selected");
        }
    }
})();
share|improve this answer

Sidenote: use http://documentcloud.github.com/backbone/

My take:

$filter = $("#filter")
$filter.click(function(){
  var value = $(this).attr("value");
  if(value != "" && value.length > charLimit){
    filterable(value)
  }
});

$filter.keyup(function(){
  var value = $(this).attr("value");
  if(value == "" || value.length <= charLimit){
      $('.alphablock').show(300);
      $('.filterable a').removeClass("selected");
  }
});

$('.slidingForm fieldset').hide();
$('.slidingForm fieldset:first').find(':input:first').focus();
share|improve this answer

I would do 2 things in general:

  • Look for common functionality that can be refactored into convention based plugins and try to reuse those.
  • Give each major view it's own js file and just load that when the view load to keep things clean
share|improve this answer

I tend to avoid binding, rather putting onClick into the element directly, unless there's a dynamic binding need. My HTML files are usually just empty structure, e.g.

<div id="content">
  <div id="sidebar" />

That sort of thing. I fill them dynamically using jQuery. My js files are organized into functional areas such as pages or classes of objects, and they all have corresponding css files. I end up with file structures like:

js/basicstuff.js
js/someclass/class1.js
css/basicstuff.css
css/someclass/class1.css

Prototype js files and their overrides share a namespace, too. I've written some pretty big apps this way, but the individual js and css files are easy to find and update since they are separated by functional areas of the app (e.g. intro, setup, stage1, main, ending, settings - for a game).

I also use an array of dynamic function groups when it makes sense - for instance, I use a global $(window).resize() function, which iterates through an array, calling a page-defined resizing function that might be needed. When the page transitions to the next one, I just remove that element in the array (although it wouldn't hurt anything to leave it in, just takes a few extra compute cycles to ignore).

share|improve this answer
    
binding your event handlers in jQuery is considered best practice. having functional code mixed with your HTML violates separation of concerns. edit - i just re-read your answer and think i am agreeing with you :P –  jbabey Jan 4 '12 at 18:00
    
I can see that @jbabey. I tend to think of the UI creation process in the same way visual editors (like Visual Studio or XCode) bind events to objects. Although the binding is resolved in code, the definition tends to occur in an Attributes-type dialog, associating it (in my mind) with the visual element. I think that carries over for me in webpages. –  Matt H Jan 4 '12 at 18:04

You can put everything into a "namespace" object and then call methods (properties which are functions) to initialize your event handlers. This keeps things pretty well organized.

$(document).ready(function () {
   filter.initialize('filter');
});

var filter = (function () {
    var initialize = function (filterID) {
        var that = $('#' + filterID);

        that.click(function() {
            var value = that.val();

            if (value != '' && value.length > charLimit) {
                filterable(value);
            }
        });

        that.keyup(function() {
            var value = that.val();

            if (value == '' || value.length <= charLimit) {
                $('.alphablock').show(300);
                $('.filterable a').removeClass("selected");
            }
        });

        $('.slidingForm fieldset').hide();
        $('.slidingForm fieldset:first').find(':input:first').focus();
    };

    return {
        initialize: initialize
    };
});
share|improve this answer

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