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I have a number of different jobs in Jenkins, partitioned out into projects with their own "pipelines" of build/test/analysis. Most of these jobs are actually remote commands instead of on-box-builds.

However, Jenkins out of the box only supports one queue for all builds. I want to define one queue per project (or view).

How would I accomplish this?

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2 Answers 2

As far as I know this is not possible without changing the Jenkins code, but I think you could achieve the same goal with minimal maintenance using build slaves. Different builds can run concurrently on the slaves, or even on the same slave if you define multiple executors (if the slave machine has >1 CPU). You can label the slaves to control which jobs get executed on each one, so you could have a separate set of slaves for each of your pipelines.

Apart from the overhead of making sure the basic slave machines stay running, the Jenkins specific overhead for running a slave is minimal. You can use a process on the master to keep the slave JAR file and the build tools you need updated; at my shop we use a simple rsync script that runs every time the master or slave is restarted to copy the latest tools from the master to the slave and restart the slave process.

This approach also reduces the extent to which the Jenkins master is a single point of failure.

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No. I am asking for the ability to have multiple queues. I can boost the number of concurrent jobs in a queue. –  Paul Nathan Jan 4 '12 at 18:00
    
Can you expand on why you need multiple queues ? –  gareth_bowles Jan 4 '12 at 19:16
    
I have multiple projects. Each project has their own pipeline. Each project can build concurrently with the others, up to some limit X - say limited by licenses for its toolsets. A build can be kicked off locally (rare) or remotely (common). Ideally Jenkins doesn't get installed on every build machine (admin cost is very high)- there's a central dispatcher sending out commands to the remote compilers. –  Paul Nathan Jan 4 '12 at 20:56
    
This can be done with a single Jenkins master and multiple slaves. The master has all the project definitions and maintains a pool of remote slaves that execute the builds. Different builds can run concurrently on the slaves, or even on the same slave if you define multiple executors (if the slave machine has >1 CPU). You can label the slaves to control which jobs get executed on each one, so you could have a separate set of slaves for each of your pipelines. The slaves just need to have a single JAR file installed, which can be controlled from the master to minimize maintenance overhead. –  gareth_bowles Jan 4 '12 at 23:43
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You can have multiple "slaves" running on the same machine to keep admin costs down; just have the one Jenkins box run multiple connections to itself so that way you can have multiple queues. I use an "on-master" slave to get one of my tests to be ran in user-space on Win7 and it doesn't muck anything up. –  SpellingD Apr 2 '12 at 14:10
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What you want can only be accomplished by running a separate Jenkins master for each project.

Usually people think a Jenkins master has more administrative overhead than a slave, but if that does not hold for you, you can run multiple masters on a server, just assign them different ports.

If this isn't good for you, then maybe Jenkins isn't the right tool for you. It is not the only CI server out there. Jenkins is very easy to set up but on the other hand it is not possible to do deep customization, like multiple build queues.

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