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Let us say there are some widgets:

function Widget1(initData) {
        ....
} 
Widget1.prototype.render = function() {
    ....
}


function Widget2(initData) {
    ....
}  
Widget2.prototype.render = function() {
    ....
}

What I need to do is the following:

$.subscribe('/launch', function(widgetName, initData) {
    // create a new object of the widget and then call the render method
});

I dont want to write multiple if-else blocks as the number of widgets may become very large. One option is to use eval(), but I believe that there may be better techniques. I am using JQuery framework, so don't want to include any other frameworks that may have a specific feature to support this. A pure Javascript solution will be appreciated.

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eval('var x = new ' + widgetName); would be one extremely ugly hackish massively bad way of going about it. –  Marc B Jan 4 '12 at 18:29
1  
If they are globals you can do new window[widgetName]() –  Esailija Jan 4 '12 at 18:29
    
Why do they need to have their own variable definition? If they're just copies of some kind of Widget why not just add them to an Array indexed by whatever string makes sense. –  Genia S. Jan 4 '12 at 18:34
    
Because each widget is complex, and each instance of the widget will have a separate state. While each instance will look similar to the other, it will render a different set of data. –  Samarth Bhargava Jan 4 '12 at 18:41

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yep, there is a way. When you create a function, it's created as a property of the this object in that context. So if you declare those Widget functions in the global scope, they become properties of the window object. As you probably know, you can access a property both as object.property or object['property']. So, if they are global, you can do something like:

$.subscribe('/launch', function(widgetName, initData) {
    var widget = new window[widgetName](initData);
});

EDIT: As T.J. Crowder said, I was horribly wrong. What I said about the function being created as a property of this applies when you're on the global scope (I want to say "only when you're on the global scope", but since I'm not 100% sure I'm gonna leave it as that).

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Thanks, this should work for me. –  Samarth Bhargava Jan 4 '12 at 18:43
1  
"When you create a function, it's created as a property of the this object in that context" No, it isn't. That's only true at global scope. Within a function, it's not true at all. –  T.J. Crowder Feb 28 '12 at 7:56
    
I added a comment. And really: Ugh, I can't believe what I wrote. –  julio.olvr Feb 28 '12 at 18:21

As the comment from Esalijia said:

$.subscribe('/launch', function(widgetName, initData) {
    // create a new object of the widget and then call the render method
    widget = new window[widgetName]();
});

Or you can bind the scope of where Widget* is defined using .bind() and have them available to the $.subscribe method.

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