Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to make a scatter plot in Python. I supposed it will be fairly simple but got stuck with understanding in scatterplot (x and y value) while plotting.

==My mission ==

  • I have database and more then 10k record (all float) till now and will increase on daily basis.
  • The record range is from 200-2000 (in float decimal).
  • So, I want to see the most populated region in my dataset.

==What I did?==

import numpy as np
import pylab as pl
import MySQLdb
import sys
import math

conn = MySQLdb.connect(
    host="localhost",
    user="root",
    passwd="root",
    db="myproject")

with conn:
    cur = conn.cursor()

    #will fetch all recoreds called monoiso field
    cur.execute("SELECT monoiso FROM pmass_selectedion")
    rows = cur.fetchall()

    for row in rows:

        #xvalue for monoiso variable and yvalue for range 
        xvalue = row
        yvalue = [600]

        # tried this way too but got x and y dimension error
        #yvalue = [400,800,1200,1600]

        pl.plot(xvalue,yvalue,'ro')
pl.show()

Scatterplot Understanding (link)

enter image description here

Ok! this plot doesnt make any sense.

==Question ==

  • How to make scatter plot to see the most populated region?
  • How can I assign y variable to make equal dimension with x variable(total number of fetched records)?

New to plotting and statistic so please help me out

share|improve this question
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Perhaps you are looking for a matplotlib histogram:

import numpy as np
import MySQLdb
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt # This is meant for scripts
# import pylab as pl # This is meant for interactive sessions; 
import operator

conn = MySQLdb.connect(
    host="localhost",
    user="root",
    passwd="root",
    db="myproject")

with conn:
    cur = conn.cursor()

    #will fetch all recoreds called monoiso field
    cur.execute("SELECT monoiso FROM pmass_selectedion")
    rows = cur.fetchall()

monoisos = [row[0] for row in rows]

# Make a histogram of `monoisos` with 50 bins.
n, bins, histpatches = plt.hist(monoisos, 50, facecolor = 'green')
plt.show()

enter image description here


You can also make a histogram/dot-plot by using numpy.histogram:

momoisos = [row[0] for row in rows]
hist, bin_edges = np.histogram(monoisos, bins = 50)
mid = (bin_edges[1:] + bin_edges[:-1])/2
plt.plot(mid, hist, 'o')
plt.show()

enter image description here


Regarding the use of pylab: The docstring for pyplot says

matplotlib.pylab combines pyplot with numpy into a single namespace. This is convenient for interactive work, but for programming it is recommended that the namespaces be kept separate.

share|improve this answer
    
@unutbu- That seems perfect histogram, but was wondering if its possible through scatter plot or any other dot plot? –  thchand Jan 4 '12 at 18:49
    
Yes, I've added an example using numpy.histogram to build the histogram values, and then used plt.plot to make the dot plot. –  unutbu Jan 4 '12 at 18:57
    
+1, but I would really replace the import operator … map(operator.itemgetter(0),rows) with a simple [v[0] for v in rows]. –  EOL Jan 4 '12 at 22:48
    
Thanks EOL. I did it because I thought it was faster, but a %timeit test shows I was wrong. Editing... –  unutbu Jan 4 '12 at 22:56
add comment

For a scatter plot, you need an equal number of x and y values. Usually in a scatter plot, one of the variables is a function of the other one, or at least both have numerical values. For example you could have x values [1, 2, 3] and y values [4, 5, 6], so then on a 2-dimensional plot, the (x, y) values of (1, 4), (2, 5) and (3, 6) will be plotted.

In your case, it seems to me there are no y-values, but only x values, and you are keeping y fixed. From what it seems to me we cannot generate a scatter plot like this. We need one y value corresponding to each x value. You could try serial numbers as y, but it might not make much sense in the plot.

share|improve this answer
    
About the post above mine: a histogram might really fit the bill here. –  Ambidextrous Jan 4 '12 at 18:44
    
@Ambidextrous- nice clearification thanks! –  thchand Jan 4 '12 at 18:51
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.