Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new to CPP, and I want to know how to run a function that isn't in its scope. I'm used to doing such things in javascript, and I get an error CPP when I try to do that. What I mean is the below:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;
int tic_h;
int tic_v;
void echo(string e_val){
   cout << e_val;
}
void c_mes(){
  echo("X|0|X\n");
  echo("-----\n");
  echo("X|0|X\n");
  echo("-----\n");
  echo("X|0|X\n");
  s_v();
}
void s_v(){
  echo("Please enter vertical coordinate: ");
  cin >> tic_v;
  if(tic_v<4&&tic_v>0){
    c_mes();
  }else{
    s_v();
  }
}
void s_h(){
  echo("Please enter horizontal coordinate: ");
  cin >> tic_h;
  if(tic_h<4&&tic_h>0){
    s_v();
  }else{
    s_h();
  }
}

int main(){
  s_h();
  return 0;
}

I get this error:

error: 'sv' was not declared in this scope on line 16

How can I make it work?

share|improve this question
    
Side note: Why are you abstracting cout behind echo()? In this program there is no point; just use, for example, cout << "X|0|X" << endl; –  Justin ᚅᚔᚈᚄᚒᚔ Jan 4 '12 at 19:17
    
I'm a web developer, so I just made the echo funtion(php) for convenience, because I'm used to that kind of syntax.' –  Kevin Pei Jan 4 '12 at 20:42

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You should put a function prototype before using the function, for the compiler to know what it is going to be.

Put

void s_v(); // prototype your functions, this is usually done in include files

Right after the #include line.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, that works. Will mark as answer when I can –  Kevin Pei Jan 4 '12 at 19:12
    
In C++, this is usually called a "declaration". The body of the function is provided by a "definition". The (single) definition of a function may follow its use, but a function must be declared before it's used. (There are exceptions for class methods). –  MSalters Jan 5 '12 at 12:37

You'll need to forward declare dostuff, as in the example below.

By doing this you pretty much tell the compiler that the function will be defined else where, but that you'd like to use it.

Excuse the wording, but putting it the way I did is easily comprehensive by a novice programmer.


#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void dostuff (); // forward declaration

void test(int b){ 
    if(b<11&&b>0){
        cout << "Yay!";
    }   
    else{
        cout << "The number is not between 1 and 10.";
        dostuff();
    }   
}

void dostuff(){
    int numput;
    cout << "Please type a number between 1 and 10:";
    cin >> numput;
    test(numput);
}

int main(){
    dostuff();
}

OP just edited the original snippet provided in his question (which the below is a modification off), I'll leave this post the way it is since it explains the situation quite well.

share|improve this answer

You need to add void s_v(); before the c_mes() function. This is called a function prototype, and it lets the compiler know that that symbol exists and will be implemented later in the code:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int tic_h;
int tic_v;
void s_v();

void echo(string e_val) {
   cout << e_val;
}

void c_mes() {
    echo("X|0|X\n");
    echo("-----\n");
    echo("X|0|X\n");
    echo("-----\n");
    echo("X|0|X\n");
    s_v();
}

void s_v() {
    echo("Please enter vertical coordinate: ");
    cin >> tic_v;
    if (tic_v < 4 && tic_v > 0) {
        c_mes();
    } else {
        s_v();
    }
}

void s_h() {
    echo("Please enter horizontal coordinate: ");
    cin >> tic_h;
    if (tic_h < 4 && tic_h > 0) {
        s_v();
    } else {
        s_h();
    }
}

int main() {
  s_h();
  return 0;
}

Keep in mind that if you ever change the signature for s_v() (that is, add arguments or change the return type), you will need to update the prototype as well.

share|improve this answer

Declare dostuff somewhere before the void test definitionm e.g on line 3:

void dostuff();

This way you introduce the signature of dostuff function to your program before the function is defined.

In C++ unlike javascript and some other languages, the parser doesn't find all functions then compile the code.

share|improve this answer

add

void dostuff();

just after the using namespace std; and it will work :)

share|improve this answer

This is the same error, you use a function before declare it (s_v()), for solve your error you only should create a prototype of s_v():

void s_v(); //at the start of your file
share|improve this answer

write this

void c_mes(){
  echo("X|0|X\n");
  echo("-----\n");
  echo("X|0|X\n");
  echo("-----\n");
  echo("X|0|X\n");
  s_v();
}

after this

void s_h(){
  echo("Please enter horizontal coordinate: ");
  cin >> tic_h;
  if(tic_h<4&&tic_h>0){
    s_v();
  }else{
    s_h();
  }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.