Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am wondering if there is an elegant way to check for the existence of a DB? In brief, how do test the connection of a db connection string?

Thanks

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You could just try connecting to it. If it throws an exception, then the connection string is bad in some way, either the database doesn't exist, the password is wrong, or something else.

DbConnection db = new SqlConnection(connection_string);
try
{
    db.Open();
}
catch ( SqlException e )
{
    // Cannot connect to database
}
share|improve this answer
1  
To be fair, this could fail for many reasons, such as incorrect format, disabled user, incorrect password and so on. –  cletus May 16 '09 at 21:07
    
We found this method unreliable, fwiw. Unplugged workstation from network and the code still reported an open connection. Suspect it's a quirk of connection pooling. –  peacedog Aug 3 '11 at 18:51

Set the Initial Catalog=master in the connection string and execute:

select count(*) from sysdatabases where name = @name

with @name set to the name of the database.

If you want to check the connection string as a whole (and not existence of an independent database), try connecting to it in a try/catch block.

share|improve this answer
    
This should be the correct answer ... –  bryanmac Dec 22 '11 at 13:48
    
how can I know above query returns? –  revolutionkpi Dec 22 '11 at 14:06

To cover the range of possibilities (server doesn't exist, database doesn't exist, no login, no permissions, server down, etc) - the simplest idea is simply to try to connect as normal, and perform something trivial - SELECT GETDATE() for example. If you get an exception, there is a problem!

There are times (especially when dealing with out-of-process systems) when try/catch is the most pragmatic option.

share|improve this answer
    
Whoever downvoted that - it is a cheap shot (unless there is something I've done stupid?). It is the same as the accepted answer, answered in the same time-frame. You have my pity. –  Marc Gravell May 16 '09 at 21:09
    
We found it necessary to execute a command, not just open a connection, for purposes of our "network status" check (which is really a "can we save stuff to the database" check). –  peacedog Aug 3 '11 at 19:25
    
@peacedog hence the SELECT GETDATE() –  Marc Gravell Aug 3 '11 at 19:35
    
I was "affirming" your answer with that comment FWIW (I voted too!). –  peacedog Aug 3 '11 at 21:13

Just try a DBConnection.Open() wrapped in a try block catching DBException.

About as elegant a solution as you are going to find.

share|improve this answer

try

IF NOT EXISTS(SELECT * FROM sys.databases WHERE [name] = @name)
   CREATE DATABASE @name;
GO

or

IF db_id(@name) IS NOT NULL
   CREATE DATABASE @name;
GO

or SqlConnection.ChangeDatabase(String). I think it could use less sql server resources then new connection attempt.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.