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As I cannot create a synthesized property in a Category in Objective-C, I do not know how to optimize the following code:

@interface MyClass (Variant)
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSString *test;
@end

@implementation MyClass (Variant)

@dynamic test;

- (NSString *)test {
    NSString *res;
    //do a lot of stuff
    return res;
}

@end

The test-method is called multiple times on runtime and I'm doing a lot of stuff to calculate the result. Normally using a synthesized property I store the value in a IVar _test the first time the method is called, and just returning this IVar next time. How can I optimized the above code?

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2  
Why not do what you normally do, only instead of a category, add the property to a MyClass base class? And to take it further, perform your heavy stuff on the background and have the process fire off a notification or call some handler for MyClass when the process is complete. –  Jeremy Jan 4 '12 at 19:59
3  
MyClass is a generated class from Core Data. If I but my custom object code inside the generated class it would disappear if I regenerate the class from my Core Data. Because of this, I'm using a category. –  dhrm Jan 4 '12 at 20:28
1  
Maybe accept the question which applies best to the title? ("Property in category") –  hfossli Jan 9 '14 at 17:55

5 Answers 5

up vote 82 down vote accepted

@Iorean's method will work, but you'd only have a single storage slot. So if you wanted to use this on multiple instances and have each instance compute a distinct value, it wouldn't work.

Fortunately, the Objective-C runtime has this thing called Associated Objects that can do exactly what you're wanting:

#import <objc/runtime.h>

static void *MyClassResultKey;
@implementation MyClass

- (NSString *)test {
  NSString *result = objc_getAssociatedObject(self, &MyClassResultKey);
  if (result == nil) {
    // do a lot of stuff
    result = ...;
    objc_setAssociatedObject(self, &MyClassResultKey, result, OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC);
  }
  return result;
}

@end
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fixed link for Associated Objects: developer.apple.com/library/ios/#documentation/cocoa/Conceptual/… –  MechEthan Jan 4 '12 at 20:22
    
@yAak thanks, fixed :) –  Dave DeLong Jan 4 '12 at 20:25
5  
@DaveDeLong Thank you for this solution! Not very beautiful but it works :) –  dhrm Jan 4 '12 at 20:33
21  
"not very beautiful"? This is the beauty of Objective-C! ;) –  Dave DeLong Jan 4 '12 at 22:55
3  
Great answer! You can even get rid the static variable using @selector(test) as a key, as explained here: stackoverflow.com/questions/16020918/… –  Gabriele Petronella Nov 7 '13 at 20:13

.h-file

@interface NSObject (LaserUnicorn)

@property (nonatomic, strong) LaserUnicorn *laserUnicorn;

@end

.m-file

#import <objc/runtime.h>

static void * LaserUnicornPropertyKey = &LaserUnicornPropertyKey;

@implementation NSObject (LaserUnicorn)

- (LaserUnicorn *)laserUnicorn {
    return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, LaserUnicornPropertyKey);
}

- (void)setLaserUnicorn:(LaserUnicorn *)unicorn {
    objc_setAssociatedObject(self, LaserUnicornPropertyKey, unicorn, OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC); 
}

@end

Just like a normal property - accessible with dot-notation

NSObject *myObject = [NSObject new];
myObject.laserUnicorn = [LaserUnicorn new];
NSLog(@"Laser unicorn: %@", myObject.laserUnicorn);

Easier syntax

Alternatively you could use @selector(nameOfGetter) instead of creating a static pointer key like so:

- (LaserUnicorn *)laserUnicorn {
    return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, @selector(laserUnicorn));
}

- (void)setLaserUnicorn:(LaserUnicorn *)unicorn {
    objc_setAssociatedObject(self, @selector(laserUnicorn), unicorn, OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC); 
}

For more details see http://stackoverflow.com/a/16020927/202451

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2  
Good article. One thing to note is an update in the article. Update December 22, 2011: It’s important to note that the key for the association is a void pointer void *key, not a string. That means that when retrieving an associated reference, you have to pass the exact same pointer to the runtime. It would not work as intended if you used a C string as the key, then copied the string to another place in memory and tried to access the associated reference by passing the pointer to the copied string as a key. –  Mr Rogers Sep 30 '13 at 17:58
1  
@MrRogers updated code to reflect that now –  hfossli Sep 30 '13 at 22:10
3  
You really don't need the @dynamic objectTag;. @dynamic means the setter & getter will be generated somewhere else, but in this case they're implemented right here. –  NSAddict Nov 26 '13 at 11:10
    
@NSAddict true! Fixed! –  hfossli Nov 26 '13 at 12:35
1  
How about the dealloc of laserUnicorns for manual memory management? Is this a memory leak? –  Manny Jan 15 '14 at 10:21

The given answer works great and my supposal is just an extension to it. In order to avoid writing repeatedly getter and setter methods for category properties I introduced macros that ease their use. Additionally these macros allow for easy usage of primitive type properties such as int or BOOL.

Traditional approach

So if you define a category property like

@interface MyClass (Category)
    @property (strong, nonatomic) NSString* text;
@end

you usually would need to implement a getter and setter method using an associated object and the get selector as the key (see original answer):

@implementation MyClass (Category)
- (NSString*) text {
    return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, @selector(text));
}

- (void)setText: (NSString) text {
    objc_setAssociatedObject(self, @selector(text), text, OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC);
}
@end

Using macros

Now, using a macro you will write instead:

@implementation MyClass (Category)

CATEGORY_PROPERTY_GET_SET(NSString*, text, setText:)

@end

The macros are defined as following:

#define CATEGORY_PROPERTY_GET(type, property) - (type) property { return objc_getAssociatedObject(self, @selector(property)); }
#define CATEGORY_PROPERTY_SET(type, property, setter) - (void) setter (type) property { objc_setAssociatedObject(self, @selector(property), property, OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC); }
#define CATEGORY_PROPERTY_GET_SET(type, property, setter) CATEGORY_PROPERTY_GET(type, property) CATEGORY_PROPERTY_SET(type, property, setter)

#define CATEGORY_PROPERTY_GET_NSNUMBER_PRIMITIVE(type, property, valueSelector) - (type) property { return [objc_getAssociatedObject(self, @selector(property)) valueSelector]; }
#define CATEGORY_PROPERTY_SET_NSNUMBER_PRIMITIVE(type, property, setter, numberSelector) - (void) setter (type) property { objc_setAssociatedObject(self, @selector(property), [NSNumber numberSelector: property], OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC); }

#define CATEGORY_PROPERTY_GET_UINT(property) CATEGORY_PROPERTY_GET_NSNUMBER_PRIMITIVE(unsigned int, property, unsignedIntValue)
#define CATEGORY_PROPERTY_SET_UINT(property, setter) CATEGORY_PROPERTY_SET_NSNUMBER_PRIMITIVE(unsigned int, property, setter, numberWithUnsignedInt)
#define CATEGORY_PROPERTY_GET_SET_UINT(property, setter) CATEGORY_PROPERTY_GET_UINT(property) CATEGORY_PROPERTY_SET_UINT(property, setter)

The macro CATEGORY_PROPERTY_GET_SET adds a getter and setter for the given property. Ready-only or write-only properties will use the CATEGORY_PROPERTY_GET and CATEGORY_PROPERTY_SET macro respectively.

As primitive types are not objects I added an exemplary macro that allows using unsigned int as the property's type. It does so by wrapping the integer value into a NSNumber object. So its usage is analog to the previous example:

@interface ...
@property unsigned int value;
@end

@implementation ...
CATEGORY_PROPERTY_GET_SET_UINT(value, setValue:)
@end

More macros can be added to support signed int, BOOL, etc...

Limitations

  1. All macros are using OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC by default.

  2. IDEs like App Code do currently not recognize the setter's name when refactoring the property's name. You would need to rename it by yourself.

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Just use libextobjc library:

h-file:

@interface MyClass (Variant)
@property (nonatomic, strong) NSString *test;
@end

m-file:

#import <extobjc.h>
@implementation MyClass (Variant)

@synthesizeAssociation (MyClass, test);

@end

More about @synthesizeAssociation

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What is the correct way to override an accessor with this (e.g. lazy load a property) –  David James Apr 9 at 9:15

Another possible solution, perhaps easier, which doesn't use Associated Objects is to declare a variable in the category implementation file as follows:

@interface UIAlertView (UIAlertViewAdditions)

- (void)setObject:(id)anObject;
- (id)object;

@end


@implementation UIAlertView (UIAlertViewAdditions)

id _object = nil;

- (id)object
{
    return _object;
}

- (void)setObject:(id)anObject
{
    _object = anObject;
}
@end

The downside of this sort of implementation is that the object doesn't function as an instance variable, but rather as a class variable. Also, property attributes can't be assigned(such as used in Associated Objects like OBJC_ASSOCIATION_RETAIN_NONATOMIC)

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The question asks about instance variable. Your solution is just like Lorean –  hfossli Feb 28 '14 at 9:17
    
Really?? Did you know what you're doing? You created a pair of getter/setter method to access an internal variable which is independent for a file BUT a class object, that is, if you allocate two UIAlertView class objects, the object values of their are the same! –  Itachi Oct 17 '14 at 6:13

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