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I have a table named b having a column j which is varchar(3) where I have stored values like

j    
----
a  
b
c
aa
ab
ac

when I write the statement like this

select * from b where j>"aa";

it shows

j
----
b
c
ab
ac

why is it so ...I thought it would show values upper than 'aa' which should ommit the values 'aa','a','b' and 'c' but it only ommits the value 'a' and 'aa' ...why is it so ? I want to know how it is checks the values when I use multi characters

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Because these are characters it's using alphabetical ordering... think of authors. Lee comes after Aberdeen even though the latter has far more characters. The evaluation is done on a char by char basis... so in your case anything greater than a as first, anything greater than a second or not existing. Hence 'b'>'aa' and 'ab'>'aa' –  Rudu Jan 4 '12 at 20:31
1  
You say it omits 'ab' but it is in your output?! Only 'a' and 'aa' are omitted which seems correct to me, because you are looking for s.th. greater (not greater equal) than 'aa' –  fkerber Jan 4 '12 at 20:32
    
Thanks guys I got it now :) –  Nav Jan 4 '12 at 20:45

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This works by lexicographical order. Like what you would find in a dictionary.

In a dictionary, first you compare the first letter and then get to the next letter.

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It's simple alphabetical order.

SELECT j FROM b ORDER BY j

would return:

j
----
a
aa
ab
ac
b
c

That should then make it clearer that the values > 'aa' are:

SELECT j FROM b WHERE j > 'aa' ORDER BY j

j
----
ab
ac
b
c
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how does it match ab with a or b or c ???? is there any order in which it matches ??? –  Nav Jan 4 '12 at 20:32
    
@Nav: As I pointed out, it compares based on the alphabetical ordering of the values. –  Joe Stefanelli Jan 4 '12 at 20:35
    
so for aa it will match for anything greater than aa or a??? –  Nav Jan 4 '12 at 20:37

When evaluating the string, b, c, ab and ac are being sorted after aa, and that is why they are being returned. Ultimately, it is due to how the string ordering is done for the table's locale.

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This is because the string comparison is done prioritizing the first letter.

If you want to skip all values with string length less than 2, then you need to have

SELECT * FROM b WHERE LENGTH(j) >= 2 AND j > 'aa'
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The where clause is comparing using dictionary order:

a aa ab ac b c

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It does so because:

aa comes before b, c, ab, ac but doesn't come before a or aa in alphabetic ordering like English language dictionary.

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