Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

What's the priority ranking of numpy bitwise operators & and | ?

if I do

a & b | c

what expression does it evaluate? a & (b | c) ? (a & b) | c ?

How about

a | b & c

I also assume NOT (~) has the highest priority?

share|improve this question
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here is a technique that you can use when your internet connection is down. It is applicable to many questions that you might have. The colloquial description of the technique is "Suck it and see".

>>> from itertools import product
>>> list(product(range(2), repeat=3))
[(0, 0, 0), (0, 0, 1), (0, 1, 0), (0, 1, 1), (1, 0, 0), (1, 0, 1), (1, 1, 0), (1, 1, 1)]
>>> all((a & b | c) == ((a & b) | c) for a, b, c in product(range(2), repeat=3))
True
>>> all((a & b | c) == (a & (b | c)) for a, b, c in product(range(2), repeat=3))
False
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for presenting an approach that people often overlook. – prelic Jan 4 '12 at 21:09
1  
I definitely like the try and see approach. One minor nitpick is that if the first statement is true the two operators could still have the same precedence, so it would be good to also check with the operators reversed (a | b & c) == ((a | b) & c). Since that is false you know that & has higher precedence than |, but it would be true for operators like + and - that are the same precedence. – Andrew Clark Jan 4 '12 at 21:18

Refer to this section of the documentation, and also this page (thanks @F.J.).

Priority is:

  1. not (~)
  2. and (&)
  3. xor (^)
  4. or (|)

This means that:

a & b | c == (a & b) | c
a | b & c == a | (b & c)
share|improve this answer
1  
According to this, ^ has higher precedence than |. Easy to prove, 1 | 2 ^ 3 != (1 | 2) ^ 3. – Andrew Clark Jan 4 '12 at 21:08
    
Good catch. I made the edit. – Benjamin Jan 4 '12 at 21:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.