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By default when you create a Win-Form a application, This is the code generated by visual studio to dispose the Form.

protected override void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (disposing && (components != null))
        {
            components.Dispose();
        }
        base.Dispose(disposing);
    }

Is this enough?Or I should unregister all events so the controls will be ready to collected by the garbage collector?

        if (disposing && (components != null))
        {
            myButton.OnClick-= MyFunction; //may be here!!
            // ... all events used
            components.Dispose();

        }
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up vote 0 down vote accepted

No, the garbage collector takes care of it. The event can never be raised anymore since the form instance was disposed which in turn disposed the button. There is a circular reference between the form and the button due to the event handler but the garbage collector has no trouble with them.

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Does this mean that you are not responsible to unregister all events? – Sleiman Jneidi Jan 4 '12 at 21:21
1  
@Hans Passant: In my experience, in case when there are influential quantity of events used in the form, or it used too often, not making unsubscription, leads to memory leaks. – Tigran Jan 4 '12 at 21:28
1  
Yes, that's what it means. It is only required when the event source outlives the event consumer. Never an issue with a form and its child controls, they all die at the same time. The events of the SystemEvents class are an example of events that have to be unsubscribed manually. – Hans Passant Jan 4 '12 at 21:31
    
@Tigran, "influential quantity" doesn't mean anything to me, sorry. Something Italian? – Hans Passant Jan 4 '12 at 21:33
    
@HansPassant: Yes, something Italian :) I mean, actually, a massive quantity of events, just the wrong word used. And now, no way to correct it. – Tigran Jan 4 '12 at 21:37

The form must unregister all events from entities which will outlive the form. It doesn't matter if the form unregisters events from entities which have the same lifetime as the form. For whatever reason, the normal doctrine seems to be "don't worry about unregistering events, except when it matters". I would think it would be much cleaner to have all objects which subscribe to events unsubscribe them on Dispose, but unfortunately neither vb.net nor C# provides any even-remotely-clean way to accomplish this. With dependencies that implement IDisposable, it's possible to wrap construction in a routine which will add the newly-created item to a list of things to be cleaned up later. One can then perform all necessary cleanup by simply calling Dispose on everything in the list. Unfortunately, from the perspective of .net, there's no nice way to write a general-purpose routine which will simultaneously subscribe to an event and return an Action<>, IDisposable, or other such object which could be used to unsubscribe.

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If this is the form that is a subject to often close and open operations, and use massive amount of events inside it, it's important to unregister all events. Cuase events consume resources definitely.

If this is a form that appears ones a while, or could even not appear ever, or it is, let's say, yuor application's MainForm, it's not important to unsubscribe from events.

What about a place where to do that, I would personally, unsubscribe inside, let's say inside Closing override and not in Dispose().

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Why not in Dispose? There is a very strong convention in .net that when a class implements IDisposable, calling Dispose on an instance should suffice to ensure that no other entity that's acting on its behalf will be left in a bad state. For an event publisher, the existence of subscribers which have been abandoned but are never going to unsubscribe is a bad state--one which IDisposable.Dispose is supposed to prevent. – supercat Jan 4 '12 at 21:22
    
@supercat: just to get rid of them as fast as possible and don't wait GC call, in case if it's not called by the user esplicitly, or by code construct (using statement). Using in Dispose() is a valid solution, btw, infact I didn't refuse it like an unacceptable one, just gave my opinion on subject. – Tigran Jan 4 '12 at 21:25
    
I didn't mean to imply that one shouldn't disconnect events before Dispose is called, but rather that if any events haven't been taken care of before Dispose is called, Dispose should finish them off. Note that Finalize() is generally pretty useless for cleaning up events, since it won't get called until the object publishing the event has been abandoned rendering the subscription moot, and since even if a Finalize() on one object revealed that some other event should be disconnected, event unsubscription is alas not guaranteed thread-safe. – supercat Jan 4 '12 at 21:50
    
@supercat: agree, a Finalize() is worst place to do that stuff. Infact I suggested write that code in Closing override. – Tigran Jan 4 '12 at 21:52

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