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So I have an ellipse with:

RADIUS_X = 100.0f;
RADIUS_Y = 30.0f;

I want to distribute 3 objects evenly along this ellipse and when I move an object, the other 2 objects move the same distance as well.

Before when I had the same radius for X and Y, every time I moved an object, I would take get the angle difference of that object's angle and the it's previous angle from where it was before, then I would use that difference to add it to the other two objects. That worked perfectly fine because

(X,Y) = (cos(angleDifference)*RADIUS_X ,sin(angleDifference)*RADIUS_Y)..

But now that I have an RADIUS_X and RADIUS_Y that are not the same, this doesn't work out so well.

Code Below:

RADIUS_Y = 30.0f;
RADIUS_X = 100.0f;

float oldAngle = [Math arcTangent:[mainVisual getYCenter] X:[mainVisual getXCenter]]; // This just gets the angle of the main object.           
float newAngle = -1.57; // This is the angle I want the main visual to move to
float tempAngle = newAngle - oldAngle; // I use tempAngle as the difference.

// Get it's (X,Y) coordinate with the new centered angle.
float yPosition = [Math sin:newAngle]*RADIUS_Y;
float xPosition = [Math cos:newAngle]*RADIUS_X;
// Set the main visual to the center.
[self setPosition:mainVisual :yPosition :xPosition];

 // for even movement along the circle.
 // iconObjectList = list of visuals(objects).
for (int i=0; i < [iconObjectList count]; i++) 
{
    Visual* v = [[iconObjectList objectAtIndex:i]getVisual];
    if(v != mainVisual) // Because I have already set the main visual
    {
        float xPos = [v getXCenter];
        float yPos = [v getYCenter];
        float angle = [Math arcTangent:yPos X:xPos]; //This just gets the angle
        angle += tempAngle; // This is where I added the difference to the current visuals angle. 

        // The code below is where i believe the problem is.
        float yPosition = [Math sin:angle]*RADIUS_Y;
        float xPosition = [Math cos:angle]*RADIUS_X;
        [self setPosition:v :yPosition :xPosition];
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Could you show your code? –  CountMurphy Jan 4 '12 at 21:32
    
Well, movements along an ellipse are not as easy as on a circle. Without having an answer ready, try to check out en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kepler's_laws_of_planetary_motion - this should get you going. –  cli_hlt Jan 4 '12 at 21:37
    
Edited with code. –  ObjectiveC-InLearning Jan 4 '12 at 21:42
    
interpolation probably would help you with this.. –  John Riselvato Jan 4 '12 at 21:45
    
Can you add an image or some animation to show the behavior? –  Fabricio Jan 4 '12 at 22:54

1 Answer 1

Maybe you just forgot to add the center point:

float yPosition = xPos + [Math sin:angle] * RADIUS_Y;
float xPosition = yPos + [Math cos:angle] * RADIUS_X;

[edit]

This is how you can set 3 vertices (interaction = 3) of the ellipse:

        var gangle:Number = 0;
        private function draw():void
        {
            var rx:Number = 50;
            var ry:Number = 25;
            var interaction:Number = 3;
            var ang:Number = (360/interaction) * Math.PI / 180; // convert to radians

            for (var i:int = 0; i < interaction; i++)
            {
                var a:Number = gangle + ang * i;
                var xx:Number = Math.cos(a) * rx;
                var yy:Number = Math.sin(a) * ry;

                // xx and yy are your new position for each Vertex
            }

            gangle += .1;  // performs an animation each frame.
        }

Maybe you got an angle issue in your code. Perhaps this example may enlighten you. It is not in Objective-c though, sorry for that.

share|improve this answer
    
No, I don't need to add the center point because the angle is equal to the current object's angle + the angle difference. So the object's current angle already takes into consideration the current position. Thanks for trying though. –  ObjectiveC-InLearning Jan 4 '12 at 22:05
    
Have you tried? :) –  Fabricio Jan 4 '12 at 22:07
    
Yes i did. >: ) –  ObjectiveC-InLearning Jan 4 '12 at 22:08
    
Did you in both statement? i mean, not only the second yPosition and xPosition, but that one outside the for statement. Thats weird because i always add the center point to such calculations. Of course that if you know it is always zero there is no need for. –  Fabricio Jan 4 '12 at 22:13
    
Just tried it and it didn't work, thanks for the effort though! –  ObjectiveC-InLearning Jan 4 '12 at 22:20

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