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I have the following line in C#:

_timer.ElapsedTick += _somefunction1;
_timer.ElapsedTick += _somefunction2;
_timer.ElapsedTick += _somefunction3;

How to invoke all methods subscribed to _timer.ElapsedTick without specifying the _somefunction ? Somewhere along this pseudo-line

invoke(_timer.ElapsedTick);

Your help is very much appreciated.

Update

Example from @M.Babcock is working. The FireEvent method does the magic. Thank you.

class InvokeFromMe
{
    public event EventHandler RaiseMe;
}
class MainClass
{
    public MainClass()
    {
        InvokeFromMe fromMe = new InvokeFromMe();
        fromMe.RaiseMe += fromMe_RaiseMe;
        fromMe.RaiseMe += fromMe_RaiseMe1;
        FireEvent(fromMe, "RaiseMe", null, EventArgs.Empty);
        //works

        System.Timers.Timer _timer = new System.Timers.Timer();
        _timer.Elapsed += _timer_Elapsed;
        FireEvent(_timer, "onIntervalElapsed", null, null);
        //throws exception
    }
    private void _timer_Elapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("_timer_Elapsed raised");
    }
    private void fromMe_RaiseMe(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Event Handler 0 Raised");
    }
    private void fromMe_RaiseMe1(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Event Handler 1 Raised");
    }
    public void FireEvent(object onMe, string invokeMe, params object[] eventParams)
    {
        MulticastDelegate eventDelagate =
              (MulticastDelegate)onMe.GetType().GetField(invokeMe,
               System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Instance |
               System.Reflection.BindingFlags.NonPublic).GetValue(onMe);

        Delegate[] delegates = eventDelagate.GetInvocationList();

        foreach (Delegate dlg in delegates)
        {
            dlg.Method.Invoke(dlg.Target, eventParams);
        }
    }
}
class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        MainClass m = new MainClass();
    }
}
share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Can it be done using conventional C#? No (as previously stated). But using reflection it is possible. Here is some tested code based on the answer to this MSDN forum thread:

class InvokeFromMe
{
    public event EventHandler RaiseMe;
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var fromMe = new InvokeFromMe();

        fromMe.RaiseMe += fromMe_RaiseMe;
        fromMe.RaiseMe += fromMe_RaiseMe1;
        fromMe.RaiseMe += fromMe_RaiseMe2;

        FireEvent(fromMe, "RaiseMe", null, EventArgs.Empty);
    }

    static void fromMe_RaiseMe(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Event Handler 0 Raised");
    }
    static void fromMe_RaiseMe1(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Event Handler 1 Raised");
    }
    static void fromMe_RaiseMe2(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Event Handler 2 Raised");
    }

    public static void FireEvent(object onMe, string invokeMe, params object[] eventParams)
    {
        MulticastDelegate eventDelagate =
              (MulticastDelegate)onMe.GetType().GetField(invokeMe,
               System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Instance |
               System.Reflection.BindingFlags.NonPublic).GetValue(onMe);

        Delegate[] delegates = eventDelagate.GetInvocationList();

        foreach (Delegate dlg in delegates)
        {
            dlg.Method.Invoke(dlg.Target, eventParams);
        }
    } 

}

UPDATE

I'm not familiar with the System.Timer.Timer class, so I'm not sure what is different from my provided example. You could perhaps try something like:

public static void FirePublicEvent(object onMe, string invokeMe, params object[] eventParams)
{
    MulticastDelegate eventDelagate =
          (MulticastDelegate)onMe.GetType().GetField(invokeMe,
           System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Instance |
           System.Reflection.BindingFlags.Public).GetValue(onMe);

    Delegate[] delegates = eventDelagate.GetInvocationList();

    foreach (Delegate dlg in delegates)
    {
       dlg.Method.Invoke(dlg.Target, eventParams);
    }
} 
share|improve this answer
    
The FireEvent is exactly what I am looking for, almost ! It is currently giving me a FieldInfo=null on the GetField. Am I missing a BindingFlag ? The target event is System.Timer.Timer.ElapsedTick . The somefunction methods are currently private, but I can change them to internals or public. –  Jeson Martajaya Jan 4 '12 at 23:24
    
@JesonMartajaya - Do you mean System.Timers.Timer.Elapsed? This won't work if the event is private. The event handlers can be private though. –  M.Babcock Jan 4 '12 at 23:31
1  
@JesonMartajaya - For the System.Timers.Timer class you will need to invoke FireEvent like so: FireEvent(fromMe, "onIntervalElapsed", this, null); –  M.Babcock Jan 5 '12 at 0:15
1  
The e parameter has to be null because ElapsedEventArgs doesn't have a public constructor and ElapsedEventArgs.Empty returns an EventArgs. You may be able to use Reflection to instantiate it too but I'd have to play with it in order to know for sure. –  M.Babcock Jan 5 '12 at 0:17
2  
I took System.dll into ILSpy and reverse engineered the event. Tools like Reflector, ILSpy, and JustDecompile are absolute must-haves for the .NET developer toolbox. –  M.Babcock Jan 5 '12 at 0:43

You can't invoke an event which is owned by another type. An event can only be invoked from the inside the class which declares it.

share|improve this answer
    
@JaredPar- Respectfully, I disagree. The example I posted below works fine for me across classes. Unless, of course, we are talking about threads rather than classes. And, even then, it can work with some extra coding. –  Matthew Patrick Cashatt Jan 4 '12 at 22:13
3  
@MatthewPatrickCashatt yes but you're using reflection. That can be used to get around a huge number of restrictions in both the CLR and C#. In general I don't consider reflection to be a valid answer for "how can I do X" It definitely works –  JaredPar Jan 4 '12 at 22:15
    
Thanks JaredPar. For my own education, why would my answer be invalid if it definitely works? –  Matthew Patrick Cashatt Jan 4 '12 at 22:16
5  
@MatthewPatrickCashatt in general when answering a "how do you do this in C#" question I limit my answers to what can be done with the language without reflection / pinvoke / COM interop. Those are very often taboo within code bases and hence not generally correct. There are loads of things which are possible once you bring in reflection that simply can't be done with C# and often with good reason. For example allowing you to invoke my event for me is dangerous. It could very easily break subtle guarantees my consumers depend on (book end events for example). –  JaredPar Jan 4 '12 at 22:18
1  
@MatthewPatrickCashatt this is by no means a hard and fast rule nor is it universally agreed on. It's my approach to answering questions. If you look through my history I'm sure you can find loads of places where I decided to throw up a reflection answer. I generally caveat my answer though with "not possible in vanilla C# but if you want to get your hands dirty" ... –  JaredPar Jan 4 '12 at 22:20

This is a work around, you can't loop through the Elapsed event. But to invoke them all, let the timer do the work. This code for System.Timer, not sure which timer you are using.

Presuming the timer is already enabled:

int interval = timer.Interval;
ElapsedEventHandler handler = null;
handler = (s,e) =>
{
    timer.Interval = interval; // put interval back to original value
    timer.Elapsed -= handler;
};
timer.Elapsed += handler;
timer.Interval = 1; // 1 millisecond, pretty much going to fire right now (as soon as you let it)

Something like that will fire the events, but your original interval will be restarted. You may have to do some math in there if you want to keep the original tick pattern.

share|improve this answer
    
This workaround worth something to consider. I am giving you a vote. –  Jeson Martajaya Jan 4 '12 at 22:54

You could create a function that runs them all:

public void RunAllFuncs()
{
   _somefunction1();
   _somefunction2();
   _somefunction3();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Definitely not what I am looking for. I have no reference to the somefunction methods other than view _timer.ElapsedTick. –  Jeson Martajaya Jan 4 '12 at 22:55

Try reading this article, it will shed some light on what you want to do, as will on some internals of the events:

http://www.switchonthecode.com/tutorials/csharp-tutorial-poking-at-event-contents

share|improve this answer
    
-1? Why? I mean, article talks in depth about events and how to invoke them. –  Daniel Mošmondor Jan 4 '12 at 23:03
    
+1 - The article answers the question. A note though, as I understand it links cannot be considered answers. –  M.Babcock Jan 5 '12 at 0:24

I think you probably need to use InvokeMember:

public void GetMethod(string methodName){

            var args = new Object[] { [INSERT ARGS IF NECESSARY--SET TO NULL OTHERWISE] };
            try
            {
                var t = new [INSERT NAME OF CLASS THAT CONTAINS YOUR METHOD]();
                Type typeInfo = t.GetType();
                var result = typeInfo.InvokeMember(methodName, BindingFlags.InvokeMethod, null, t, args);
                return result;
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                return ex;
            }
}

Then call it like this:

_timer.ElapsedTick += GetMethod("[INSERT METHOD NAME AS STRING]");

Be sure to include this:

using System.Reflection;

Good Luck!

share|improve this answer
    
To make it clearer, I am looking to manually raise the _timer.ElapsedTick event. From your proposed solution, do you think I can call GetMethod("_timer.ElapsedTick") ? –  Jeson Martajaya Jan 4 '12 at 22:24
    
This is close but not quite. Your code here runs a method directly. You need to first get the field that represents the event on the type as a MulticastDelegate, then get its invocationlist and from there you can dynamically invoke each method individually. The answer to this MSDN question shows how to do it. –  M.Babcock Jan 4 '12 at 22:26
    
You can call any method you like using "GetMethod", but just take a look at @JaredPar's comments as he has some reservations. I have been using GetMethod successfully, but its hard to ignore a guy with 178k reputation when he warns against it. Good luck! –  Matthew Patrick Cashatt Jan 4 '12 at 22:27
    
@MatthewPatrickCashatt - Yes you are right, you can invoke any method directly using the code you provided, but that isn't the question. –  M.Babcock Jan 4 '12 at 22:30
    
@M.Babcock- I see that you are very good at playing devil's advocate with my answer (which works). Perhaps you could provide your own answer rather than pointing out that mine is incorrect/not answering the question? We are software developers--not lawyers arguing semantics. Let's help this guy out, shall we? –  Matthew Patrick Cashatt Jan 4 '12 at 22:49

You can only call events from inside the class that declares it. If you wrote the timer class, you would invoke it like this:

this.ElapsedTick(this, eventArgs);

Outside the timer class you may do as follows to get similar behavior:

delegate void delegateSample(object sender, EventArgs e);

delegateSample d;
d += new delegateSample(_somefunction1);
d += new delegateSample(_somefunction2);
d(this, EventArgs.Empty);

delegateSample should actually be the type of the ElapsedTick event, instead of declaring another delegate type. I just didn't know the name of that delegate. Just make sure you add each function the ElapsedTick event and the delegate variable you declare then you can call them all from the delegate outside the Timer class.

share|improve this answer
    
It is possible to call events across the class barrier in many instances. The trick is doing it across assemblies. –  ouflak Oct 9 '13 at 16:15

Depending on the signature of the ElapsedTick event, you can fire the event by calling it like a method from inside the class in which it is declared. For example:

ElapsedTick(this, new EventArgs());
share|improve this answer
1  
EventArgs.Empty is nice at it avoids an unnecessary allocation. Also, you can't invoke an event from outside of the class like that. –  Ed S. Jan 4 '12 at 22:06
    
I failed to mention that it is fired this way from inside the class. Also, using EventArgs.Empty is a nice touch. –  Bernard Jan 4 '12 at 22:08
    
I tried the following _timer.ElapsedTick(this, ElapsedEventArgs.Empty); and it gives a compile-time error: 'System.Timers.Timer' does not contain a definition for 'ElapsedTick' and no extension method 'ElapsedTick' accepting a first argument of type 'System.Timers.Timer' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?) –  Jeson Martajaya Jan 4 '12 at 22:59

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