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My question is that why do we need to specify a dest. The file which I am putting into hdfs does not necessarily lie entirely on the local machine, so what is the use of specifying dest in the command.

When I run the command via command lie and then later do hadoop dfs -ls I can see my file getting listed in the hdfs but when I create the file pro-grammatically using

FileSystem fs      = FileSystem.get(conf);
Path filenamePath  = new Path("hello.txt");
fs.create(filenamePath);

and then later do hadoop dfs -ls I can't find this file.

In my core-site.xml I have the following...

<!-- In: conf/core-site.xml -->
<property>
  <name>hadoop.tmp.dir</name>
  <value>/home/apurv/hadoop/hdfs</value>
  <description>A base for other temporary directories.</description>
</property>

<property>
  <name>fs.default.name</name>
  <value>hdfs://localhost:54310</value>
  <description>The name of the default file system.  A URI whose
  scheme and authority determine the FileSystem implementation.  The
  uri's scheme determines the config property (fs.SCHEME.impl) naming
  the FileSystem implementation class.  The uri's authority is used to
  determine the host, port, etc. for a filesystem.</description>
</property>

Intuitively also it does not make sense to me where does the copied file reside, as it might be large enough to reside on a single machine.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

We chatted on Talk about it and I have a bit more time to explain this to you.

If you use this snippet in your code:

FileSystem fs      = FileSystem.get(conf);
// stuff to create

then it is important what is inside the conf object. If you put nothing into it, the FileSystem returned is always local.

If you put this in your conf:

conf.set("fs.default.name", "hdfs://localhost:54310");

then you should be connected to your HDFS via the namenode on that "server" and you are able to write to HDFS.

If you want to let the configuration read the XMLs, then you have to use the #addResource() methods.

Look into the documentation here: http://hadoop.apache.org/common/docs/current/api/org/apache/hadoop/conf/Configuration.html

A sample usage could be:

Configuration conf = new Configuration();
conf.addResource(new Path("/usr/local/hadoop/conf/hdfs-site.xml"));

Then all your hdfs-site.xml mappings will be inside your conf.

Play arround a bit with it, it really feels intuitive. At least for me ;)

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FileSystem#Create(Path) opens a stream to the indicated path. The stream has to be closed before the file is visible.

My question is that why do we need to specify a dest. The file which I am putting into hdfs does not necessarily lie entirely on the local machine, so what is the use of specifying dest in the command.

Not sure exactly what you mean, but destination specifies the target location.

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Thanks, I understood this. It works this way because hdfs is a agnostic file system which I was missing. –  Apurv Jan 31 '12 at 7:59

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