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I am working on a game and I am writing an Entity base class. Since many of the entities will behave like particles(2D) I want to use a normal instead of a rotation in degrees. However since I am using OpenGL I need to have the degree of the normal to rotate. What is the fastest way to convert from the normal to degrees and vice versa. I know that I can use trigonometric functions such as atan2 sin cos etc, but I am pretty sure there is a faster method. Any help or direction would be appreciated.

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The normal is always 90 degrees from the surface. I'm not sure what you're after... –  Byte56 Jan 5 '12 at 0:36
    
no its in two dimensions. ill make a diagram. –  stas Jan 5 '12 at 0:36
    
I might simply make a lookup table if I can't figure it out. ':P –  stas Jan 5 '12 at 0:45
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1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you're constrained to two dimensions and you're trying to convert a directional vector (x, y) to degrees from the x-axis, then atan2(y, x) is almost definitely going to be your fastest method, unless you're constraining the possible values of x and y to some pretty trivial cases. To get the degrees from the y-axis, just use atan2(x, y), of course. This angle will be in radians. Multiply by 180/pi to convert to degrees. This should require a trivial amount of time.

The figure you're drawing suggests that atan2(x, y) * 180 / Math.PI will give you the results you desire.

Don't be concerned with speed unless you've profiled your code and have determined that there is a bottleneck in this calculation (which is unlikely).

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Upvoted for the final paragraph, lots of people make that mistake. –  SHiRKiT Jan 5 '12 at 1:13
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