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I am looking for suggestions to optimize this query that already runs for over an hour with about 300,000 rows in the table. We are using a reporting tool that requires data to be in this shape when it's pulled, so re-designing table structure is not an option. The table looks like this:

CREATE TABLE [datatable](
    [RowID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) NOT NULL,
    [CampaignID] [int] NOT NULL,
    [CampaignName] [nvarchar](255) NULL,
    [Category] [nvarchar](255) NOT NULL,
    [PostID] [int] NOT NULL,
    [TopicName] [nvarchar](4000) NULL,
    [TopicFrequency] [int] NULL
)

Data is being constantly added to the table, so I have to periodically update topic frequencies. Here is my current query:

UPDATE  datatable
SET     TopicFrequency = b.TopicFrequency
FROM    datatable INNER JOIN
  (SELECT CampaignID, Category, TopicName, COUNT(DISTINCT PostID) AS TopicFrequency
    FROM datatable GROUP BY CampaignID, Category, TopicName) AS b 
    ON datatable.CampaignID = b.CampaignID 
    AND datatable.Category = b.Category 
    AND datatable.TopicName = b.TopicName

With topic name being nvarchar 4000 I can't create an index on the field. Looking for ideas. Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
What about indexes? – zerkms Jan 5 '12 at 1:00
    
Have you examined the execution plan for the query to locate the bottleneck? An index that combines both CampaignID and Category columns may help. And you may want to add a tag to your question to specify the database you're using, e.g. sql-server-2008. – HABO Jan 5 '12 at 4:00
up vote 1 down vote accepted

General decision - is to split your table into two or more tables - ie - normalize the data structure. I think that two more tables can be introduced - for Campaigns and Topics

BUT

For your present data structures you can create an uniqueidentifier or bigint computed column as hash of TopicName field, index it and look for hash instead of string field. I'll provide you an example with bigint:

SET ANSI_NULLS ON
GO
SET QUOTED_IDENTIFIER ON
GO

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[HashString64SVF](@input NVARCHAR(4000))
RETURNS BIGINT
WITH SCHEMABINDING, RETURNS NULL ON NULL INPUT 
AS 
BEGIN
    RETURN
        CAST(SUBSTRING(HASHBYTES('SHA1', UPPER(@Input)), 1, 8) AS BIGINT) 
    ^   CAST(SUBSTRING(HASHBYTES('SHA1', UPPER(@Input)), 9, 8) AS BIGINT) 
    ^   CAST(SUBSTRING(HASHBYTES('SHA1', UPPER(@Input)), 17, 4) AS BIGINT) 
END
GO
ALTER TABLE datatable ADD TopicNameHash AS dbo.HashString64SVF(TopicName)
GO
CREATE INDEX NewIndexName ON DataTable(TopicNameHash, CampaignID, Category) INCLUDE(PostId)
GO
UPDATE  datatable
SET     TopicFrequency = b.TopicFrequency
FROM    datatable 
JOIN
  (SELECT CampaignID, Category, TopicNameHash, COUNT(DISTINCT PostID) AS TopicFrequency
    FROM datatable GROUP BY CampaignID, Category, TopicNameHash) AS b 
    ON datatable.CampaignID = b.CampaignID 
    AND datatable.Category = b.Category 
    AND datatable.TopicNameHash = b.TopicNameHash

AND

Create a primary key on RowId column

AND

Recreate the table in way like this:

CREATE TABLE [datatable](
    [RowID] [int] IDENTITY(1,1) PRIMARY KEY,
    [CampaignID] [int] NOT NULL,
    [Category] [nvarchar](255) NOT NULL,
    [PostID] [int] NOT NULL,
    --uncomment if needed [TopicNameHash] AS dbo.HashString64SVF(TopicName),
    [TopicFrequency] [int] NULL,
    [CampaignName] [nvarchar](255) NULL,
    [TopicName] [nvarchar](4000) NULL
)

The main reason - if your nullable variable columns is in the end of columns list and there are many NULL values in these columns - sql server can save a little space in row and thus - in IO

share|improve this answer

Trigger

Update frequency field as data is inserted/updated/deleted? Spreads load over time, and the only records that get updated are the ones relevant to changed data.


TopicID

Have a Topic table, which may or may not have more than just id, name. You can then use (and index on) the TopicID instead.

As you have TopicName in both a GROUP BY and the JOIN, being able to index this will make a massive performance difference.


LastModified or other Audit Track

Record (and include in an index) the last modified time, or some other audit tracking. This will enable you to narrow the scope of the update to just Topics which have had records inserted/updated/deleted since the last batch process.


Normalisation

Keep the Frequency value in another table, keyed by Campaign, Category, Topic.

At present, if your COUNT(*) yields 100, you're updating 100 records. Normalisation will mean one update per group.


Obvious Note?

Just because you normalise or refactor the underlying data, you're not (surely?) prevented from replacing this table with a view onto a 'better' designed structure?

The reporting tool reads the view as if it were a table. The data processing interacts directly with the refactored table structure, in a much more efficient manner.

Separation of data reporting considerations and data processing considerations will make you a much more free person.

share|improve this answer

If you could avoid corelated subquery to update it, I think it will improve the performance. Why don't you directly join your table and update the table. see this link

share|improve this answer

I had similar issue some time ago: Thirdparty software was using the table that was too big for some data manipulation. Trick I made to resolve the problem was to:

  1. create optimized table structure and copy data from old table
  2. Delete old table
  3. Create view with the same name as deleted table that uses optimized structure and has same structure as old table

For thirdparty software there was no difference between table and view.

You can also add triggers on view to make it updatable.

share|improve this answer

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