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Hey Im trying to learn how to write assembly code in my C programs. I understand integers in assembly but floats continue to trip me up.

double asmSqrt(double x) {
    double o;
    __asm__ ("fld %1;"
             "fsqrt;"
             "fst %0;"
             : "=g" (o)
             : "g"  (x)
    );
    return o;
}

As you can see Im just trying to find the square root of x. But whenever I try to compile it I get an operand type mismatch error.

I followed the same syntax used here: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cpp/edujini_inline_asm.aspx?display=Print

PS: Im using MinGW GCC on Windows XP

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Does the calling convention on windows return a float in register ST0 or in FP0? –  rsaxvc Jan 5 '12 at 2:14
    
What are your compiler flags? –  rsaxvc Jan 5 '12 at 4:33
    
I think will needlessly flush back to the stack so to avoid that you need to implement the return as well. Flushing to the stack also trims your precision down to 64-bit double instead of 80-bit x87. (If you're doing this for speed, more is needed;If for learning, Carl's answer fixed it for me). –  rsaxvc Jan 5 '12 at 5:11
    
Im not using any compiler flags. Something I should be using?? –  Dan Jan 6 '12 at 2:01

4 Answers 4

Specify memory location "=m" instead of "=g". But best is to read this manual here: http://ibiblio.org/gferg/ldp/GCC-Inline-Assembly-HOWTO.html#s4

Anyway, here is the solution:

double asmSqrt(double x) {
  double o;
  __asm__ ("fld %1;"
           "fsqrt;"
           "fst %0;"
           : "=m" (o)
           : "g" (x)
  );
  return o;
}
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Doesn't work on my machine... it has the same error as the OP mentions about operand type mismatches. Actually, since I'm using clang, it says: "ambiguous instructions require an explicit suffix (could be 'flds', 'fldl', or 'fldt')". –  Carl Norum Jan 5 '12 at 3:43
    
Thank you but theres still an issue. It compiles and seems to runs great but when I print out the returned value its just 0.0 and it also seems to do funky things with whatever code is around it. int main() { double number = 5.12343; printf("%f %f", number, asmSqrt(144.0)); getchar(); } When I run this the function returns a huge long float. And thanks for the link. Explained the different constraints much better than any other website Ive seen so far. Much appreciated. –  Dan Jan 6 '12 at 0:59
    
Fair enough; toy examples are good for learning purposes. :) I suggest you choose an appropriate manual from here and search the table of contents for "constraints" - the t constraint is listed in the machine-specific part. There's also a section (just before that) that talks about "asm" in general and x86 floating-point stack usage in particular. –  ams Jan 6 '12 at 9:18

You need to explicitly specify which fld and fst instruction variants you want. Otherwise, the compiler doesn't know what size your operand is supposed to be. This code works for me here:

__asm__ ("fldl %1  ;"
         "fsqrt    ;"
         "fstl %0  ;"
         : "=g" (o)
         : "g"  (x)
);

You can use a disassembler to double-check that the right opcodes for 64-bit FLD and FST (DD/0 and DD/2) are getting emitted.

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I tried this code and it still doesnt work :/ could it be something with the compiler? –  Dan Jan 6 '12 at 0:22
    
I'm sure that GCC has been able to handle inline assembly pretty successfully for some time. I don't have MinGW, so maybe it's environment related, though. Sorry this answer didn't help! –  Carl Norum Jan 6 '12 at 18:58
    
I compiled executed it on my linux machine and your solution worked perfectly so it must be something inside MinGW like you said. Thank you so much everyone for your help! Edit: On windows I had to specify the size like you mentioned and use the memory constraint for o. I dont know why I didnt think to try it sooner :) Thanks again to everyone for helping me out! –  Dan Jan 8 '12 at 1:55

First, why are you doing this? The compiler can do square roots itself. You just call the proper math library function, enable optimization (so it will inline standard functions) and I'd be surprised if it doesn't do what you want. The result is platform independent (i.e. you can build for 64-bit if you want, or even a whole other architecture), easy to maintain code - much better!

If you insist on doing it the hard way, gcc can also help here (I've not actually tested this):

double asmSqrt(double x) {
  __asm__ ("fsqrt" : "+t" (x));
  return x;
}

The t constraint means put the value on the top of the floating-point stack - you don't have to care how it gets there. The + means to use the value for both input and output.

Edit: Oh, and if you do want to put things in registers yourself then you had better tell the compiler about that in the 'clobbers' section or you might overwrite something it has stored there.

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Learning purposes. I have other assembly code that Im using the code I posted in and I continue to get this error. I just isolated the fsqrt instruction because I can replace it with something like idiv and it works fine. But thank you for the working code –  Dan Jan 6 '12 at 0:28

double sqrt1(double n) { __asm{ fld n fsqrt } }

call the method: double result = sqrt1((double)10) for example

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