Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Good evening, Experts

I am practising linux bash shell

I have to write a script that takes a sentence and prints the word count, character count (excluding the spaces), length of each word and the length. I know that there exist wc -m to counter number of characters in the word, but how to make use of it in script?

i have script file here is my code:

#!/bin/bash

mystring="one two three test five"
maxlen=0;
for token in $mystring; do
  echo -n "$token: ";
  echo -n $token | wc -m;
    if [ ${#token} -gt $maxlen ]; then 
      maxlen=${#token}; fi;
done

echo "--------------------------";
echo -n "Total words: ";
echo "$mystring" | wc -w;
echo -n "Total chars: ";
echo "$mystring" | wc -m;
echo -n "Max length: "; 
echo $maxlen

Thank you, Jaypal Singh, jcomeau_ictx, Eugen Rieck

share|improve this question
    
Sounds like homework. If it is, please tag it as such. For many of us, if we see that tag, we'll make a greater effort to help you learn why the answer is what it is, rather than just providing a solution. –  ghoti Jan 5 '12 at 2:56
    
thank you, ghoti, will mention further. But i am just practising with scripts and shell commands –  mydreamadsl Jan 5 '12 at 2:59
    
And what is your question? –  Raedwald Jul 9 '13 at 19:55
    
The one liner for the CLI: echo 'Here is my test String' | wc -m –  Droogans Feb 13 at 15:35

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

riffing on Jaypal Singh's answer:

jcomeau@intrepid:~$ mystring="one two three four five"
jcomeau@intrepid:~$ echo "string length: ${#mystring}"
string length: 23
jcomeau@intrepid:~$ echo -n "lengths of words: "; i=0; for token in $mystring; do echo -n "${#token} "; i=$((i+1)); done; echo; echo "word count: $i"
lengths of words: 3 3 5 4 4 
word count: 5
jcomeau@intrepid:~$ echo -n "maximum string length: "; maxlen=0; for token in $mystring; do if [ ${#token} -gt $maxlen ]; then maxlen=${#token}; fi; done; echo $maxlen
maximum string length: 5
share|improve this answer
    
thanks for your answer, how can i output only maximum length? –  mydreamadsl Jan 5 '12 at 2:45
    
what do you mean by "maximum length"? –  jcomeau_ictx Jan 5 '12 at 2:46
    
like token "three" is the largest word in the string, and it's length is 5 –  mydreamadsl Jan 5 '12 at 2:47
    
ah, OK. I will edit the answer –  jcomeau_ictx Jan 5 '12 at 2:47
    
thank you very much (: –  mydreamadsl Jan 5 '12 at 2:48
#!/bin/bash

mystring="one two three test five"
for token in $mystring; do
  echo -n "$token: ";
  echo -n $token | wc -m;
done
echo "--------------------------";
echo -n "Total words: ";
echo "$mystring" | wc -w;
echo -n "Total chars: ";
echo "$mystring" | wc -m;
share|improve this answer
    
Wow, cool, thanks!) how can i check maximum length of the word in whole string? –  mydreamadsl Jan 5 '12 at 2:38
echo $mystring | wc -w

or

echo $mystring | wc --words

will do a word count for you.

You can pipe each word to wc:

echo $token | wc -m

to store the result in a variable:

mycount=`echo $token | wc -m`
echo $mycount

to add to the total as you go word by word, do math with this syntax:

total=0
#start of your loop
total=$((total+mycount))
#end of your loop
echo $total
share|improve this answer

You are very close. In bash you can use # to get the length of your variable.

Also, if you want to use bash interpreter use bash instead of sh and the first line goes like this -

#!/bin/bash

Use this script -

#!/bin/bash

mystring="one two three test five"
for token in $mystring
do
    if [ $token = "one" ]
    then
        echo ${#token}
    elif [ $token = "two" ]
    then
        echo ${#token}
    elif [ $token = "three" ]
    then
        echo ${#token}
    elif [ $token = "test" ]
    then
        echo ${#token}
    elif [ $token = "five" ]
    then
        echo ${#token}
    fi
done
share|improve this answer
    
There are a couple ways to do arithmetic in the shell. I like foo=$((bar + 1)) –  mkb Jan 5 '12 at 2:29

The wc command is a good bet.

$ echo "one two three four five" | wc
       1       5      24

where the result is number of lines, words and characters. In a script:

#!/bin/sh

mystring="one two three four five"

read lines words chars <<< `wc <<< $mystring`

echo "lines: $lines"
echo "words: $words"
echo "chars: $chars"

echo -n "word lengths:"
declare -i nonspace=0
declare -i longest=0
for word in $mystring; do
  echo -n " ${#word}"
  nonspace+=${#word}"
  if [[ ${#word} -gt $longest ]]; then
    longest=${#word}
  fi
done
echo ""
echo "nonspace chars: $nonspace"
echo "longest word: $longest chars"

The declare built-in casts a variable as an integer here, so that += will add rather than append.

$ ./doit
lines: 1
words: 5
chars: 24
word lengths: 3 3 5 4 4
nonspace chars: 19
share|improve this answer
string="i am a string"

n=$(echo $string | wc -w )

echo $n

4

The value of n can be used as an integer in expressions

eg.

echo $((n+1))
5
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.