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I'm asking for a template trick to detect if a class has a specific member function of a given signature.

The problem is similar to the one cited here http://www.gotw.ca/gotw/071.htm but not the same: in the item of Sutter's book he answered to the question that a class C MUST PROVIDE a member function with a particular signature, else the program won't compile. In my problem I need to do something if a class has that function, else do "something else".

A similar problem was faced by boost::serialization but I don't like the solution they adopted: a template function that invokes by default a free function (that you have to define) with a particular signature unless you define a particular member function (in their case "serialize" that takes 2 parameters of a given type) with a particular signature, else a compile error will happens. That is to implement both intrusive and non-intrusive serialization.

I don't like that solution for two reasons: 1) to be non intrusive you must override the global "serialize" function that is in boost::serialization namespace, so you have IN YOUR CLIENT CODE to open namespace boost and namespace serialization!! And a second, practical reason, is because the stack to resolve that mess was 10 to 12 function invocation... and I'm a game developer.

I need to define a custom behavior for classes that has not that member function, and my entities are inside different namespaces (and I don't want to override a global function defined in one namespace while I'm in another one)

Can you give me an hint to solve this puzzle?

EDIT: @Chris Jester-Young I know well Koenig lookup. In fact I was surprised of what they did in documentation (http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_36_0/libs/serialization/doc/index.html)

why open the boost::serialization namespace?

but you are not answering to my question: I don't want to do the same thing of boost::serialization. Maybe I decide to do "nothing" if the class has not that function with that signature. in boost::serialization if you don't have that member function OR if you don't override global "serialize" function... compile error! I don't want this.

EDIT: @Tom Leys I'm sorry that's not what I expected as answer. What you suggest me is not what I want. If you read the link to the gotw site (old site of Herb Sutter) you'll discover that your solution is both intrusive (and I don't want) and it doesn't solve the problem with the signature and it doesn't solve the fact that I can accept classes that don't have that member function... It's a bit more tricky.

share|improve this question
    
Similar question: stackoverflow.com/questions/257288 –  Johannes Schaub - litb Aug 25 '09 at 20:02
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes What kind of answer are you looking for? This answer by Mike Kinghan goes quite in depth and is using C++11 stuff. –  jrok May 29 '13 at 17:04
    
@R.MartinhoFernandes Maybe this is the modern version you are looking for? –  Daniel Frey May 29 '13 at 19:36

10 Answers 10

up vote 38 down vote accepted

I'm not sure if I understand you correctly, but you may exploit SFINAE to detect function presence at compile-time. Example from my code (tests if class has member function size_t used_memory() const).

template<typename T>
struct HasUsedMemoryMethod
{
    template<typename U, size_t (U::*)() const> struct SFINAE {};
    template<typename U> static char Test(SFINAE<U, &U::used_memory>*);
    template<typename U> static int Test(...);
    static const bool Has = sizeof(Test<T>(0)) == sizeof(char);
};

template<typename TMap>
void ReportMemUsage(const TMap& m, std::true_type)
{
        // We may call used_memory() on m here.
}
template<typename TMap>
void ReportMemUsage(const TMap&, std::false_type)
{
}
template<typename TMap>
void ReportMemUsage(const TMap& m)
{
    ReportMemUsage(m, 
        std::integral_constant<bool, HasUsedMemoryMethod<TMap>::Has>());
}
share|improve this answer
2  
wtf is this??? is it legal c++ code?? can you write "template<typename U, size_t (U::*)() const>"?? but... it's a great and new solution! I thank you, I'll analyze better tomorrow with my collegues... great! –  ugasoft Sep 17 '08 at 21:39
1  
The example is missing the definition of 'int_to_type'. Obviously it doesn't add to the answer, but it does mean that people can see your code in action after a quick cut & paste. –  Richard Corden Sep 18 '08 at 17:50
1  
A simple definition of int_to_type could be: 'template <int N> struct int_to_type {};'. Many implementations keep the paramter N value either in an enum or else in a static integer constant (template <int N> struct int_to_type { enum { value = N }; }; / template <int N> struct int_to_type { static const int value = N; }) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Sep 3 '09 at 22:04
    
When using C++0x you can simply return the type you want and write "decltype(Test<T>(0))" whenever you need the type. –  tstenner Sep 9 '09 at 14:14
1  
Simply take boost::integral_constant instead of int_to_type. –  Vadim Ferderer Sep 28 '09 at 5:15

Here's a possible implementation relying on C++11 features. It correctly detects the function even if it's inherited (unlike the solution in the accepted answer, as Mike Kinghan observes in his answer).

The function this snippet tests for is called serialize:

#include <type_traits>

// Primary template with a static assertion
// for a meaningful error message
// if it ever gets instantiated.
// We could leave it undefined if we didn't care.

template<typename, typename T>
struct has_serialize {
    static_assert(
        std::integral_constant<T, false>::value,
        "Second template parameter needs to be of function type.");
};

// specialization that does the checking

template<typename C, typename Ret, typename... Args>
struct has_serialize<C, Ret(Args...)> {
private:
    template<typename T>
    static constexpr auto check(T*)
    -> typename
        std::is_same<
            decltype( std::declval<T>().serialize( std::declval<Args>()... ) ),
            Ret    // ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^
        >::type;  // attempt to call it and see if the return type is correct

    template<typename>
    static constexpr std::false_type check(...);

    typedef decltype(check<C>(0)) type;

public:
    static constexpr bool value = type::value;
};

Usage:

struct X {
     int serialize(const std::string&) { return 42; } 
};

struct Y : X {};

std::cout << has_serialize<Y, int(const std::string&)>::value; // will print 1
share|improve this answer
    
Does this work if Y does not have a method called "serialize"? I don't see how it would return a false value if the method "serialize" didn't exist. –  Collin Feb 20 '14 at 3:47
1  
@Collin in that case substitution of template parameter fails for first overload of check and it's discarded from overload set. It falls back to the second one that returns false_type. This is not a compiler error because SFINAE principle. –  jrok Feb 20 '14 at 7:57
    
Oh, and the arrow is from the new return value syntax in C++11, described here: cprogramming.com/c++11/… –  Collin Feb 22 '14 at 0:24

The accepted answer to this question of compiletime member-function introspection, although it is justly popular, has a snag which can be observed in the following program:

#include <type_traits>
#include <iostream>
#include <memory>

/*  Here we apply the accepted answer's technique to probe for the
    the existence of `E T::operator*() const`
*/
template<typename T, typename E>
struct has_const_reference_op
{
    template<typename U, E (U::*)() const> struct SFINAE {};
    template<typename U> static char Test(SFINAE<U, &U::operator*>*);
    template<typename U> static int Test(...);
    static const bool value = sizeof(Test<T>(0)) == sizeof(char);
};

using namespace std;

/* Here we test the `std::` smart pointer templates, including the
    deprecated `auto_ptr<T>`, to determine in each case whether
    T = (the template instantiated for `int`) provides 
    `int & T::operator*() const` - which all of them in fact do.
*/ 
int main(void)
{
    cout << has_const_reference_op<auto_ptr<int>,int &>::value;
    cout << has_const_reference_op<unique_ptr<int>,int &>::value;
    cout << has_const_reference_op<shared_ptr<int>,int &>::value << endl;
    return 0;
}

Built with GCC 4.6.3, the program outputs 110 - informing us that T = std::shared_ptr<int> does not provide int & T::operator*() const.

If you are not already wise to this gotcha, then a look at of the definition of std::shared_ptr<T> in the header <memory> will shed light. In that implementation, std::shared_ptr<T> is derived from a base class from which it inherits operator*() const. So the template instantiation SFINAE<U, &U::operator*> that constitutes "finding" the operator for U = std::shared_ptr<T> will not happen, because std::shared_ptr<T> has no operator*() in its own right and template instantiation does not "do inheritance".

This snag does not affect the well-known SFINAE approach, using "The sizeof() Trick", for detecting merely whether T has some member function mf (see e.g. this answer and comments). But establishing that T::mf exists is often (usually?) not good enough: you may also need to establish that it has a desired signature. That is where the illustrated technique scores. The pointerized variant of the desired signature is inscribed in a parameter of a template type that must be satisfied by &T::mf for the SFINAE probe to succeed. But this template instantiating technique gives the wrong answer when T::mf is inherited.

A safe SFINAE technique for compiletime introspection of T::mf must avoid the use of &T::mf within a template argument to instantiate a type upon which SFINAE function template resolution depends. Instead, SFINAE template function resolution can depend only upon exactly pertinent type declarations used as argument types of the overloaded SFINAE probe function.

By way of an answer to the question that abides by this constraint I'll illustrate for compiletime detection of E T::operator*() const, for arbitrary T and E. The same pattern will apply mutatis mutandis to probe for any other member method signature.

#include <type_traits>

/*! The template `has_const_reference_op<T,E>` exports a
    boolean constant `value that is true iff `T` provides
    `E T::operator*() const`
*/ 
template< typename T, typename E>
struct has_const_reference_op
{
    /* SFINAE operator-has-correct-sig :) */
    template<typename A>
    static std::true_type test(E (A::*)() const) {
        return std::true_type();
    }

    /* SFINAE operator-exists :) */
    template <typename A> 
    static decltype(test(&A::operator*)) 
    test(decltype(&A::operator*),void *) {
        /* Operator exists. What about sig? */
        typedef decltype(test(&A::operator*)) return_type; 
        return return_type();
    }

    /* SFINAE game over :( */
    template<typename A>
    static std::false_type test(...) {
        return std::false_type(); 
    }

    /* This will be either `std::true_type` or `std::false_type` */
    typedef decltype(test<T>(0,0)) type;

    static const bool value = type::value; /* Which is it? */
};

In this solution, the overloaded SFINAE probe function test() is "invoked recursively". (Of course it isn't actually invoked at all; it merely has the return types of hypothetical invocations resolved by the compiler.)

We need to probe for at least one and at most two points of information:

  • Does T::operator*() exist at all? If not, we're done.
  • Given that T::operator*() exists, is its signature E T::operator*() const?

We get the answers by evaluating the return type of a single call to test(0,0). That's done by:

    typedef decltype(test<T>(0,0)) type;

This call might be resolved to the /* SFINAE operator-exists :) */ overload of test(), or it might resolve to the /* SFINAE game over :( */ overload. It can't resolve to the /* SFINAE operator-has-correct-sig :) */ overload, because that one expects just one argument and we are passing two.

Why are we passing two? Simply to force the resolution to exclude /* SFINAE operator-has-correct-sig :) */. The second argument has no other signifance.

This call to test(0,0) will resolve to /* SFINAE operator-exists :) */ just in case the first argument 0 satifies the first parameter type of that overload, which is decltype(&A::operator*), with A = T. 0 will satisfy that type just in case T::operator* exists.

Let's suppose the compiler say's Yes to that. Then it's going with /* SFINAE operator-exists :) */ and it needs to determine the return type of the function call, which in that case is decltype(test(&A::operator*)) - the return type of yet another call to test().

This time, we're passing just one argument, &A::operator*, which we now know exists, or we wouldn't be here. A call to test(&A::operator*) might resolve either to /* SFINAE operator-has-correct-sig :) */ or again to might resolve to /* SFINAE game over :( */. The call will match /* SFINAE operator-has-correct-sig :) */ just in case &A::operator* satisfies the single parameter type of that overload, which is E (A::*)() const, with A = T.

The compiler will say Yes here if T::operator* has that desired signature, and then again has to evaluate the return type of the overload. No more "recursions" now: it is std::true_type.

If the compiler does not choose /* SFINAE operator-exists :) */ for the call test(0,0) or does not choose /* SFINAE operator-has-correct-sig :) */ for the call test(&A::operator*), then in either case it goes with /* SFINAE game over :( */ and the final return type is std::false_type.

Here is a test program that shows the template producing the expected answers in varied sample of cases (GCC 4.6.3 again).

// To test
struct empty{};

// To test 
struct int_ref
{
    int & operator*() const {
        return *_pint;
    }
    int & foo() const {
        return *_pint;
    }
    int * _pint;
};

// To test 
struct sub_int_ref : int_ref{};

// To test 
template<typename E>
struct ee_ref
{
    E & operator*() {
        return *_pe;
    }
    E & foo() const {
        return *_pe;
    }
    E * _pe;
};

// To test 
struct sub_ee_ref : ee_ref<char>{};

using namespace std;

#include <iostream>
#include <memory>
#include <vector>

int main(void)
{
    cout << "Expect Yes" << endl;
    cout << has_const_reference_op<auto_ptr<int>,int &>::value;
    cout << has_const_reference_op<unique_ptr<int>,int &>::value;
    cout << has_const_reference_op<shared_ptr<int>,int &>::value;
    cout << has_const_reference_op<std::vector<int>::iterator,int &>::value;
    cout << has_const_reference_op<std::vector<int>::const_iterator,
            int const &>::value;
    cout << has_const_reference_op<int_ref,int &>::value;
    cout << has_const_reference_op<sub_int_ref,int &>::value  << endl;
    cout << "Expect No" << endl;
    cout << has_const_reference_op<int *,int &>::value;
    cout << has_const_reference_op<unique_ptr<int>,char &>::value;
    cout << has_const_reference_op<unique_ptr<int>,int const &>::value;
    cout << has_const_reference_op<unique_ptr<int>,int>::value;
    cout << has_const_reference_op<unique_ptr<long>,int &>::value;
    cout << has_const_reference_op<int,int>::value;
    cout << has_const_reference_op<std::vector<int>,int &>::value;
    cout << has_const_reference_op<ee_ref<int>,int &>::value;
    cout << has_const_reference_op<sub_ee_ref,int &>::value;
    cout << has_const_reference_op<empty,int &>::value  << endl;
    return 0;
}

Are there new flaws in this idea? Can it be made more generic without once again falling foul of the snag it avoids?

share|improve this answer

This should be sufficient, if you know the name of the member function you are expecting. (In this case, the function bla fails to instantiate if there is no member function (writing one that works anyway is tough because there is a lack of function partial specialization. You may need to use class templates) Also, the enable struct (which is similar to enable_if) could also be templated on the type of function you want it to have as a member.

template <typename T, int (T::*) ()> struct enable { typedef T type; };
template <typename T> typename enable<T, &T::i>::type bla (T&);
struct A { void i(); };
struct B { int i(); };
int main()
{
  A a;
  B b;
  bla(b);
  bla(a);
}
share|improve this answer
    
thaks! it's similar to the solution proposed by yrp. I didn't know that template can be templated over member functions. That's a new feature I've learned today! ... and a new lesson: "never say you are expert on c++" :) –  ugasoft Sep 17 '08 at 21:43

You can use std::is_member_function_pointer

class A {
   public:
     void foo() {};
}

 bool test = std::is_member_function_pointer<decltype(&A::foo)>::value;
share|improve this answer
4  
Won't &A::foo be a compile error if there's no foo at all in A? I read the original question as being supposed to work with any input class, not just ones that have some sort of member named foo. –  Jeff Walden Mar 11 '13 at 22:11

To be non-intrusive, you can also put serialize in the namespace of the class being serialised, or of the archive class, thanks to Koenig lookup. See Namespaces for Free Function Overrides for more details. :-)

Opening up any given namespace to implement a free function is Simply Wrong. (e.g., you're not supposed to open up namespace std to implement swap for your own types, but should use Koenig lookup instead.)

share|improve this answer

Okay. Second try. It's okay if you don't like this one either, I'm looking for more ideas.

Herb Sutter's article talks about traits. So you can have a traits class whose default instantiation has the fallback behaviour, and for each class where your member function exists, then the traits class is specialised to invoke the member function. I believe Herb's article mentions a technique to do this so that it doesn't involve lots of copying and pasting.

Like I said, though, perhaps you don't want the extra work involved with "tagging" classes that do implement that member. In which case, I'm looking at a third solution....

share|improve this answer
    
eh... I've analyzed this solution... I think it's a little bit too expensive for users of my framework. (ok, I admit, I'm developing a streaming framework and I'm choosing between extending iostream or rewriting something easier) –  ugasoft Sep 17 '08 at 21:34
    
but I thank you for your suggestion :) –  ugasoft Sep 17 '08 at 21:35
    
My third solution would be to use SFINAE. Since yrp's answer already mentions it, I won't go into it (because I'm still researching on it: I know the idea, but the devil is in the details), unless his solution doesn't work for you in the end. :-) –  Chris Jester-Young Sep 17 '08 at 22:00

Here are some usage snippets: *The guts for all this are farther down

Check for member x in a given class. Could be var, func, class, union, or enum:

CREATE_MEMBER_CHECK(x);
bool has_x = has_member_x<class_to_check_for_x>::value;

Check for member function void x():

//Func signature MUST have T as template variable here... simpler this way :\
CREATE_MEMBER_FUNC_SIG_CHECK(x, void (T::*)(), void__x);
bool has_func_sig_void__x = has_member_func_void__x<class_to_check_for_x>::value;

Check for member variable x:

CREATE_MEMBER_VAR_CHECK(x);
bool has_var_x = has_member_var_x<class_to_check_for_x>::value;

Check for member class x:

CREATE_MEMBER_CLASS_CHECK(x);
bool has_class_x = has_member_class_x<class_to_check_for_x>::value;

Check for member union x:

CREATE_MEMBER_UNION_CHECK(x);
bool has_union_x = has_member_union_x<class_to_check_for_x>::value;

Check for member enum x:

CREATE_MEMBER_ENUM_CHECK(x);
bool has_enum_x = has_member_enum_x<class_to_check_for_x>::value;

Check for any member function x regardless of signature:

CREATE_MEMBER_CHECK(x);
CREATE_MEMBER_VAR_CHECK(x);
CREATE_MEMBER_CLASS_CHECK(x);
CREATE_MEMBER_UNION_CHECK(x);
CREATE_MEMBER_ENUM_CHECK(x);
CREATE_MEMBER_FUNC_CHECK(x);
bool has_any_func_x = has_member_func_x<class_to_check_for_x>::value;

OR

CREATE_MEMBER_CHECKS(x);  //Just stamps out the same macro calls as above.
bool has_any_func_x = has_member_func_x<class_to_check_for_x>::value;

Details and core:

/*
    - Multiple inheritance forces ambiguity of member names.
    - SFINAE is used to make aliases to member names.
    - Expression SFINAE is used in just one generic has_member that can accept
      any alias we pass it.
*/

//Variadic to force ambiguity of class members.  C++11 and up.
template <typename... Args> struct ambiguate : public Args... {};

//Non-variadic version of the line above.
//template <typename A, typename B> struct ambiguate : public A, public B {};

template<typename A, typename = void>
struct got_type : std::false_type {};

template<typename A>
struct got_type<A> : std::true_type {
    typedef A type;
};

template<typename T, T>
struct sig_check : std::true_type {};

template<typename Alias, typename AmbiguitySeed>
struct has_member {
    template<typename C> static char ((&f(decltype(&C::value))))[1];
    template<typename C> static char ((&f(...)))[2];

    //Make sure the member name is consistently spelled the same.
    static_assert(
        (sizeof(f<AmbiguitySeed>(0)) == 1)
        , "Member name specified in AmbiguitySeed is different from member name specified in Alias, or wrong Alias/AmbiguitySeed has been specified."
    );

    static bool const value = sizeof(f<Alias>(0)) == 2;
};

Macros (El Diablo!):

CREATE_MEMBER_CHECK:

//Check for any member with given name, whether var, func, class, union, enum.
#define CREATE_MEMBER_CHECK(member)                                         \
                                                                            \
template<typename T, typename = std::true_type>                             \
struct Alias_##member;                                                      \
                                                                            \
template<typename T>                                                        \
struct Alias_##member <                                                     \
    T, std::integral_constant<bool, got_type<decltype(&T::member)>::value>  \
> { static const decltype(&T::member) value; };                             \
                                                                            \
struct AmbiguitySeed_##member { char member; };                             \
                                                                            \
template<typename T>                                                        \
struct has_member_##member {                                                \
    static const bool value                                                 \
        = has_member<                                                       \
            Alias_##member<ambiguate<T, AmbiguitySeed_##member>>            \
            , Alias_##member<AmbiguitySeed_##member>                        \
        >::value                                                            \
    ;                                                                       \
}

CREATE_MEMBER_VAR_CHECK:

//Check for member variable with given name.
#define CREATE_MEMBER_VAR_CHECK(var_name)                                   \
                                                                            \
template<typename T, typename = std::true_type>                             \
struct has_member_var_##var_name : std::false_type {};                      \
                                                                            \
template<typename T>                                                        \
struct has_member_var_##var_name<                                           \
    T                                                                       \
    , std::integral_constant<                                               \
        bool                                                                \
        , !std::is_member_function_pointer<decltype(&T::var_name)>::value   \
    >                                                                       \
> : std::true_type {}

CREATE_MEMBER_FUNC_SIG_CHECK:

//Check for member function with given name AND signature.
#define CREATE_MEMBER_FUNC_SIG_CHECK(func_name, func_sig, templ_postfix)    \
                                                                            \
template<typename T, typename = std::true_type>                             \
struct has_member_func_##templ_postfix : std::false_type {};                \
                                                                            \
template<typename T>                                                        \
struct has_member_func_##templ_postfix<                                     \
    T, std::integral_constant<                                              \
        bool                                                                \
        , sig_check<func_sig, &T::func_name>::value                         \
    >                                                                       \
> : std::true_type {}

CREATE_MEMBER_CLASS_CHECK:

//Check for member class with given name.
#define CREATE_MEMBER_CLASS_CHECK(class_name)               \
                                                            \
template<typename T, typename = std::true_type>             \
struct has_member_class_##class_name : std::false_type {};  \
                                                            \
template<typename T>                                        \
struct has_member_class_##class_name<                       \
    T                                                       \
    , std::integral_constant<                               \
        bool                                                \
        , std::is_class<                                    \
            typename got_type<typename T::class_name>::type \
        >::value                                            \
    >                                                       \
> : std::true_type {}

CREATE_MEMBER_UNION_CHECK:

//Check for member union with given name.
#define CREATE_MEMBER_UNION_CHECK(union_name)               \
                                                            \
template<typename T, typename = std::true_type>             \
struct has_member_union_##union_name : std::false_type {};  \
                                                            \
template<typename T>                                        \
struct has_member_union_##union_name<                       \
    T                                                       \
    , std::integral_constant<                               \
        bool                                                \
        , std::is_union<                                    \
            typename got_type<typename T::union_name>::type \
        >::value                                            \
    >                                                       \
> : std::true_type {}

CREATE_MEMBER_ENUM_CHECK:

//Check for member enum with given name.
#define CREATE_MEMBER_ENUM_CHECK(enum_name)                 \
                                                            \
template<typename T, typename = std::true_type>             \
struct has_member_enum_##enum_name : std::false_type {};    \
                                                            \
template<typename T>                                        \
struct has_member_enum_##enum_name<                         \
    T                                                       \
    , std::integral_constant<                               \
        bool                                                \
        , std::is_enum<                                     \
            typename got_type<typename T::enum_name>::type  \
        >::value                                            \
    >                                                       \
> : std::true_type {}

CREATE_MEMBER_FUNC_CHECK:

//Check for function with given name, any signature.
#define CREATE_MEMBER_FUNC_CHECK(func)          \
template<typename T>                            \
struct has_member_func_##func {                 \
    static const bool value                     \
        = has_member_##func<T>::value           \
        && !has_member_var_##func<T>::value     \
        && !has_member_class_##func<T>::value   \
        && !has_member_union_##func<T>::value   \
        && !has_member_enum_##func<T>::value    \
    ;                                           \
}

CREATE_MEMBER_CHECKS:

//Create all the checks for one member.  Does NOT include func sig checks.
#define CREATE_MEMBER_CHECKS(member)    \
CREATE_MEMBER_CHECK(member);            \
CREATE_MEMBER_VAR_CHECK(member);        \
CREATE_MEMBER_CLASS_CHECK(member);      \
CREATE_MEMBER_UNION_CHECK(member);      \
CREATE_MEMBER_ENUM_CHECK(member);       \
CREATE_MEMBER_FUNC_CHECK(member)
share|improve this answer

Came with the same kind of problem myself, and found the proposed solutions in here very interesting... but had the requirement for a solution that:

  1. Detects inherited functions as well;
  2. Is compatible with non C++11 ready compilers (so no decltype)

Found another thread proposing something like this, based on a BOOST discussion. Here is the generalisation of the proposed solution as two macros declaration for traits class, following the model of boost::has_* classes.

#include <boost/type_traits/is_class.hpp>
#include <boost/mpl/vector.hpp>

/// Has constant function
/** \param func_ret_type Function return type
    \param func_name Function name
    \param ... Variadic arguments are for the function parameters
*/
#define DECLARE_TRAITS_HAS_FUNC_C(func_ret_type, func_name, ...) \
    __DECLARE_TRAITS_HAS_FUNC(1, func_ret_type, func_name, ##__VA_ARGS__)

/// Has non-const function
/** \param func_ret_type Function return type
    \param func_name Function name
    \param ... Variadic arguments are for the function parameters
*/
#define DECLARE_TRAITS_HAS_FUNC(func_ret_type, func_name, ...) \
    __DECLARE_TRAITS_HAS_FUNC(0, func_ret_type, func_name, ##__VA_ARGS__)

// Traits content
#define __DECLARE_TRAITS_HAS_FUNC(func_const, func_ret_type, func_name, ...)  \
    template                                                                  \
    <   typename Type,                                                        \
        bool is_class = boost::is_class<Type>::value                          \
    >                                                                         \
    class has_func_ ## func_name;                                             \
    template<typename Type>                                                   \
    class has_func_ ## func_name<Type,false>                                  \
    {public:                                                                  \
        BOOST_STATIC_CONSTANT( bool, value = false );                         \
        typedef boost::false_type type;                                       \
    };                                                                        \
    template<typename Type>                                                   \
    class has_func_ ## func_name<Type,true>                                   \
    {   struct yes { char _foo; };                                            \
        struct no { yes _foo[2]; };                                           \
        struct Fallback                                                       \
        {   func_ret_type func_name( __VA_ARGS__ )                            \
                UTILITY_OPTIONAL(func_const,const) {}                         \
        };                                                                    \
        struct Derived : public Type, public Fallback {};                     \
        template <typename T, T t>  class Helper{};                           \
        template <typename U>                                                 \
        static no deduce(U*, Helper                                           \
            <   func_ret_type (Fallback::*)( __VA_ARGS__ )                    \
                    UTILITY_OPTIONAL(func_const,const),                       \
                &U::func_name                                                 \
            >* = 0                                                            \
        );                                                                    \
        static yes deduce(...);                                               \
    public:                                                                   \
        BOOST_STATIC_CONSTANT(                                                \
            bool,                                                             \
            value = sizeof(yes)                                               \
                == sizeof( deduce( static_cast<Derived*>(0) ) )               \
        );                                                                    \
        typedef ::boost::integral_constant<bool,value> type;                  \
        BOOST_STATIC_CONSTANT(bool, is_const = func_const);                   \
        typedef func_ret_type return_type;                                    \
        typedef ::boost::mpl::vector< __VA_ARGS__ > args_type;                \
    }

// Utility functions
#define UTILITY_OPTIONAL(condition, ...) UTILITY_INDIRECT_CALL( __UTILITY_OPTIONAL_ ## condition , ##__VA_ARGS__ )
#define UTILITY_INDIRECT_CALL(macro, ...) macro ( __VA_ARGS__ )
#define __UTILITY_OPTIONAL_0(...)
#define __UTILITY_OPTIONAL_1(...) __VA_ARGS__

These macros expand to a traits class with the following prototype:

template<class T>
class has_func_[func_name]
{
public:
    /// Function definition result value
    /** Tells if the tested function is defined for type T or not.
    */
    static const bool value = true | false;

    /// Function definition result type
    /** Type representing the value attribute usable in
        http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_53_0/libs/utility/enable_if.html
    */
    typedef boost::integral_constant<bool,value> type;

    /// Tested function constness indicator
    /** Indicates if the tested function is const or not.
        This value is not deduced, it is forced depending
        on the user call to one of the traits generators.
    */
    static const bool is_const = true | false;

    /// Tested function return type
    /** Indicates the return type of the tested function.
        This value is not deduced, it is forced depending
        on the user's arguments to the traits generators.
    */
    typedef func_ret_type return_type;

    /// Tested function arguments types
    /** Indicates the arguments types of the tested function.
        This value is not deduced, it is forced depending
        on the user's arguments to the traits generators.
    */
    typedef ::boost::mpl::vector< __VA_ARGS__ > args_type;
};

So what is the typical usage one can do out of this?

// We enclose the traits class into
// a namespace to avoid collisions
namespace ns_0 {
    // Next line will declare the traits class
    // to detect the member function void foo(int,int)
    DECLARE_TRAITS_HAS_FUNC_C(void, foo, int, int);
}

// we can use BOOST to help in using the traits
#include <boost/utility/enable_if.hpp>

// Here is a function that is active for types
// declaring the good member function
template<typename T> inline
typename boost::enable_if< ns_0::has_func_foo<T> >::type
foo_bar(const T &_this_, int a, int b)
{   _this_.foo(a,b);
}

// Here is a function that is active for types
// NOT declaring the good member function
template<typename T> inline
typename boost::disable_if< ns_0::has_func_foo<T> >::type
foo_bar(const T &_this_, int a, int b)
{   default_foo(_this_,a,b);
}

// Let us declare test types
struct empty
{
};
struct direct_foo
{
    void foo(int,int);
};
struct direct_const_foo
{
    void foo(int,int) const;
};
struct inherited_const_foo :
    public direct_const_foo
{
};

// Now anywhere in your code you can seamlessly use
// the foo_bar function on any object:
void test()
{
    int a;
    foo_bar(a); // calls default_foo

    empty b;
    foo_bar(b); // calls default_foo

    direct_foo c;
    foo_bar(c); // calls default_foo (member function is not const)

    direct_const_foo d;
    foo_bar(d); // calls d.foo (member function is const)

    inherited_const_foo e;
    foo_bar(e); // calls e.foo (inherited member function)
}
share|improve this answer

I believe the answer you are looking for is here.

http://www.martinecker.com/wiki/index.php?title=Detecting_the_Existence_of_Operators_at_Compile-Time

and a slightly more filled out example here

http://pastie.org/298994

I use the technique to detect the presence of a supporting ostream operator << on the class in question and then generate a different bit of code depending.

I didn't believe it was possible before finding the linked solution but it is a very neat trick. Spend the time understanding the code and it is very worth the while.

Brad

share|improve this answer

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