Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Say I have some javascript in yum.js that defines an object like this

/* yum.js */

var Yum = {
    MY_ID: "yum@yum.yum",

    MAX_PIES: 100,

    pies_eaten: [],

    pie_string: "blueberry",    

    eat_pie: function(pietype) {
        alert("mmmm, " + pietype);
    }

 }

I have an HTML file yumtest.html where I want to include yum.js and call some functions. The HTML looks like

<!-- yumtest.html -->

<html>
<head>

<script type="text/javascript" src="yum.js"></script>

<script type="text/javascript"> 
    function run_tests() {
        alert("The Yum class is type '" + typeof Yum + "'.");
        alert("pie_string is '" + Yum.pie_string + "'.");
        Yum.eat_pie("apple");
    }
</script>

</head>
<body>

<input type="button" value="Click to run tests" onclick="run_tests()">

</body>
</html>

This works fine: I can click the button and the alert tells me "pie_string is 'blueberry'". This is good.

However, say I want to initialize pie_string to some value returned by a function on another object. I change yum.js so pie_string is created with

pie_string: OtherObj.get_best_pie(),

//... in another file, OtherObj is defined with
get_best_pie: function() {
    return "blueberry";
},

When I click the button to run the same code, this doesn't work. yumtest.html tells me "The Yum class is type 'undefined'", and calls to Yum.x properties or methods don't work. Code execution stops.

So I'm wondering:

1) Why does initializing the variable as a function's return value prevent me from including the file in an HTML page? (my current guess is that the function is unable to execute and return when the file is being parsed and added to the HTML - see Extra Info below)

2) Is there a way to get an error message about the inclusion failing, or is silent failure normal/expected from JavaScript?

Extra Information

The reason I ask is because I see this happening in a Firefox extension. Several variables are being initialized this way using

varname : Components.classes["@mozilla.org/extension-name-string;1"]
        .getService(Components.interfaces.nsIPrefBranchInternal),

to load various user preferences. This works fine and the extension runs normally, so presumably this is valid Javascript code. Or at least - valid in some situations? Perhaps the difference between running as actual Javascript and being parsed and included in HTML prevents the function from running and returning a value?

Workaround

I suppose one workaround would be to redefine Yum as a class, and initialize variables in the constructor.

For those who can't or don't want to refactor their code into a class, good news. You can keep the variable defined in-place but still include that file in HTML by defining the variable as a function and calculating the return value inside. For example, we could do

pie_string: function() {
    // do some calculations here;
    // whatever we would have done in get_best_pie()
    return "blueberry";
},

This means you have to change all of you calls of Yum.pie_string to Yum.pie_string() (or perhaps you want to rename the function 'get_pie_string()' so it's clear...). But the javascript file can then be included inside HTML and used normally.

phew!

share|improve this question
    
Aha! Thanks to the excellent and informative help from nnnnnn, tobyodavies, and ErikE I think I now understand what's actually going on. I was able to clarify my question and thus now we can get an even fuller answer. I have updated my incorrect terms of 'class' and 'variable' to the correct 'object' and 'property' where applicable as well. I hope that's okay. –  culix Jan 5 '12 at 17:06
add comment

4 Answers 4

Say I have some javascript in yum.js that defines a class like this

You don't have a class, in the sense of a template from which instances can be created, you have an object. JavaScript doesn't have classes in the sense that, say, Java does, though you can use JS functions as object constructors if called with the new keyword.

1) Why does initializing the variable as a function's return value prevent me from including the file in an HTML page?

This has nothing to do with whether you are including the JS as an external file - even if you included it in a script block in your html file it still wouldn't work.

The problem is that you are not initialising variables (plural), you are creating a single variable Yum that is being initialised from an object literal. What you are thinking of as "variables" are really "properties" of that object. JS object literal syntax does not allow you to set properties that reference other properties of the same object - if you think about it the object doesn't exist until after that line of code runs and the entire object literal has been evaluated, and of course you can't refer to properties of something that doesn't exist yet.

What you can do is initialise most of the object properties via the object literal and then add your pie_string property afterwards:

var Yum = {
   MY_ID: "yum@yum.yum",
   MAX_PIES: 100,
   pies_eaten: [],
   get_best_pie: function() {
      return "blueberry";
   }, 
   eat_pie: function(pietype) {
      alert("mmmm, " + pietype);
   }
}

Yum.pie_string = Yum.get_best_pie();

Or define the get_best_pie() function independent of the object literal and then set the pie_string property from it:

function get_best_pie() {
   return "blueberry";
}

var Yum = {
   pie_string : get_best_pie(), 
   eat_pie: function(pietype) {
      alert("mmmm, " + pietype);
   },
   // etc
}

2) Is there a way to get an error message about the inclusion failing, or is silent failure normal/expected from JavaScript?

The inclusion of the file is succeeding, but then you are getting a JavaScript error which you are already seeing (the one you quoted).

Regarding your "extra information" section, the code you quote is, again, not creating a variable - with the : syntax it must be an extract from the middle of another object literal, creating a property. If so, it is perfectly valid for it to be set to the return from a function defined as a property of a different object that already exists - I think you'll find that's what's happening.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for this informative reply! This info helped me realize I had mis-stated what is actually going on, and I think the question is easier to answer once clarified. Hopefully it is okay to edit my question? > JS object literal syntax does not allow you to set properties that reference other properties of the same object My bad - get_best_pie() should actually be a property on a different object. You are correct when you mention this at the end with your note about the : syntax. I will update the question. –  culix Jan 5 '12 at 16:40
add comment

because there is never a function called get_best_pie for you to call

It is a member of an object, notably an object that doesn't exist yet, so even if you called it by the correct name (Yum.get_best_pie()) it still wouldn't work. you need to define the function outside the object using

function get_best_pie(){
    //...
}

in the file somewhere

share|improve this answer
    
My bad - get_best_pie() should indeed be on another object. I have updated the question. Thanks! –  culix Jan 5 '12 at 17:07
    
Does that second object exist yet? If so OtherObject.get_best_pie() should work fine. If it's in another file you must ensure that file has loaded before the one defining Yum –  tobyodavies Jan 6 '12 at 4:13
add comment

At object creation time you are trying to assign one of the properties to the return value of another property (a function) declared in the same object!

In javascript, objects have no scope, only functions. Thus, the reference to get_best_pie() in the Yum object's definition will scope to the window as in window.get_best_pie, which does not exist. Because Yum does not exist yet, the function you want to call (whose return value you want to store in pie_string) does not exist yet (until after the object is created).

The reason the libraries you're looking at work is because they apparently are not referring to the container object that is being created. They reference the Components object which must already have been instantiated (or, if not, then the code snippet you gave exists inside a function which is not invoked at object creation time).

Javascript has no explicit way to create getters and setters for properties (so far, though ideas on this are in the works). This means that properties must be simple scalars or objects that are dereferenced without parentheses, or, you must use functions instead and dereference the value using parentheses to invoke the function (rather than refer to it).

You might consider something like the following. It is close to what you want and lets you continue to use property notation rather than switching to a function:

var Yum = {
    MY_ID: "yum@yum.yum",
    MAX_PIES: 100,
    pies_eaten: [],
    get_best_pie: function() {
        return "blueberry";
    },
    eat_pie: function(pietype) {
        alert("mmmm, " + pietype);
    },
    init: function() {
        Yum.pie_string = get_best_pie();
        // other initialization here.
    }
};
Yum.init();
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you. Yes, the Components object does already exist. I have clarified the question and I think I will use a .init() method. Thanks! –  culix Jan 5 '12 at 17:08
add comment
up vote 0 down vote accepted

They key to why including yum.js fails is that the object we're calling for get_best_pie() is not just any object - it's an 'xpconnect wrapped' object, and so calling get_best_pie() requires extra permissions. If OtherObj was just a regular object that style of initialization would work, and we could include the HTML file. But the browser fails to access OtherObj when trying to include yum.js. Presumably this leaves us with only a partial object definition for Yum, which is why it remains undefined and can't be used.

The reason this fails for the Firefox extension is because Components.classes is an 'xpconnect wrapped' object, and the html page doesn't have permission to access it.

To include yum.js in an HTML file we need to have the proper permissions when initializing pie_string. One way to do that (as mentioned by @ErikE and @nnnnnn) is to initialize the variable inside a function - this allows the caller to ask for permission before initializing, and yum.js can then be parsed and included normally in yumtest.html.

var Yum = {
    //... rest of object definition goes here
    init : function() {
        //important: assigning to 'pie_string' will create a new local variable;
        //use this.pie_string instead to reference the property of this class.
        this.pie_string = Components.classes["@mozilla.org/extension-string;1"]
                    .getService(Components.interfaces.nsIPrefBranchInternal);
}

};

Improper Solutions

Here are two sqlutions that don't work. Does anybody know why?

  1. Trying to ask for permission inside a script before including the file

    <script type="text/javascript">
    netscape.security.PrivilegeManager.enablePrivilege('UniversalXPConnect');
    </script>
    <script type="text/javascript" src="yum.js"></script>
    
  2. Trying to ask for permission and then including the file dynamically

    netscape.security.PrivilegeManager.enablePrivilege('UniversalXPConnect');
    var script = document.createElement("script");
    script.type="text/javascript";
    script.src="yum.js";
    document.getElementsByTagName("head")[0].appendChild(script);
    
share|improve this answer
    
Careful with that use of this. If the function is executed in certain contexts or with call or apply, this will NOT be Yum. –  ErikE Jan 31 '12 at 19:32
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.