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I am using scan-build (checker-258) from the command line to do static analysis on my iOS project and find that uncovers far fewer issues than xcode (about 60% less). If I set xcode 4.2 to use scan-build from checker-258 it finds all the issues (and more). This may be because the command line version us using the old (not modern) run time as it is finding issues like:

error: synthesized property 'foo' must either be named the same as a compatible ivar or must explicitly name an ivar
@synthesize foo;
            ^

Here is the command I'm using to run the analysis:

scan-build --use-cc=`which clang` -k -o scan-reports xcodebuild -target MyTarget -project myproject.xcodeproj -sdk iphonesimulator5.0 -configuration Debug clean build

Thanks in advance.

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2 Answers 2

Yes, the version of the static analyzer that ships with Xcode 4.2 is older than the version on the clang website. There are instructions here on how to use the newer version within Xcode: http://clang-analyzer.llvm.org/xcode.html

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Hi Mark, I've got the new checker working well from Xcode 4.2. However when I run it from the command like it fines far less issues that when I run it from inside Xcode. I'm curious why. –  Jason Leach Jan 9 '12 at 20:19
    
Ahh, if you're sure that Xcode and the command-line are running the same version, with the exact same arguments/target/config, then it might be worth filing a bug against Xcode. –  Mark F Jan 9 '12 at 22:19

Try to use this command: scan-build -k -V -o scan-reports xcodebuild clean build -configuration Debug -sdk iphoneos5.0 -xcconfig="myConfig.xcconfig"

Where myconfig contains the CODE_SIGNING_IDENTITY="", PROVISIONING_PROFILE=""

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