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I have been asked in an interview how do i allocate a 2-D array and below was my solution to it.

#include <stdlib.h>

    int **array;
    array = malloc(nrows * sizeof(int *));

    for(i = 0; i < nrows; i++)
        {
        array[i] = malloc(ncolumns * sizeof(int));
        if(array[i] == NULL)
            {
            fprintf(stderr, "out of memory\n");
            exit or return
            }
        }

I thought I have done good job but then he asked me to do it using one malloc statement not two.I don't have any idea how to achieve it.

Can anyone suggest me some idea to do it in single malloc?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 21 down vote accepted

Just compute the total amount of memory needed for both nrows row-pointers, and the actual data, add it all up, and do a single call:

int **array = malloc(nrows * sizeof *array + (nrows * (ncolumns * sizeof **array));

If you think this looks too complex, you can split it up and make it a bit self-documenting by naming the different terms of the size expression:

int **array; /* Declare this first so we can use it with sizeof. */
const size_t row_pointers_bytes = nrows * sizeof *array;
const size_t row_elements_bytes = ncolumns * sizeof **array;
array = malloc(row_pointers_bytes + nrows * row_elements_bytes);

You then need to go through and initialize the row pointers so that each row's pointer points at the first element for that particular row:

size_t i;
int *data = array + nrows;
for(i = 0; i < nrows; i++)
  array[i] = data + i * ncolumns;

Note that the resulting structure is subtly different from what you get if you do e.g. int array[nrows][ncolumns], because we have explicit row pointers, meaning that for an array allocated like this, there's no real requirement that all rows have the same number of columns.

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+1: better than mine, no casting :) –  Necrolis Jan 5 '12 at 9:45
    
@Unwind can i have pictorial view of memory for this solution it helpes in greated details to understand this code. –  Amit Singh Tomar Jan 5 '12 at 10:04
    
@AmitSinghTomar: I don't think I can represent this in ASCII clearly, and don't have the time to draw something in a real graphics program at the moment, sorry. Perhaps someone can step in? :) –  unwind Jan 5 '12 at 10:08
    
Thanks any way @unwind ,I got an idea how's things are working in memory for your code. –  Amit Singh Tomar Jan 5 '12 at 10:10
1  
@AmitSinghTomar It takes more memory since you have a pointer for each row, which is necessary to "hide" the fact that the width of the array is dynamic. It allows double indexing like array[i][j] by making array[i] be a valid pointer at that row's data. –  unwind Feb 25 at 21:18
int **array = malloc (nrows * sizeof(int *) + (nrows * (ncolumns * sizeof(int)));

This works because in C, arrays are just all the elements one after another as a bunch of bytes. There is no metadata or anything. malloc() does not know whether it is allocating for use as chars, ints or lines in an array.

Then, you have to initialize:

int *offs = &array[nrows]; /*  same as int *offs = array + nrows; */
for (i = 0; i < nrows; i++, offs += ncolumns) {
    array[i] = offs;
}
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Thanks Amigable for your solution but I don't understand where int *offs = &arr[nrows] come from,I mean purpose of this line and where we have declared &arr[nrows] ?? –  Amit Singh Tomar Jan 5 '12 at 9:55
    
The added setup code looks wrong, the row stride is 1, should be ncolumns. –  unwind Jan 5 '12 at 10:00
    
int* data = array + nrows; in unwinds answer is the same as int* offs = &array[nrows]; @AmitSinghTomar –  Prof. Falken Jan 5 '12 at 10:23
    
Thanks @AmigableClarkKant got your point a[i]=*(a+i) ,something like this –  Amit Singh Tomar Jan 5 '12 at 10:28
    
@AmitSinghTomar, except the *, that would de-reference to the actual int, not the pointer. –  Prof. Falken Jan 5 '12 at 10:30

You should be able to do this with (bit ugly with all the casting though):

int** array;
size_t pitch, ptrs, i;   
char* base; 
pitch = rows * sizeof(int);
ptrs = sizeof(int*) * rows;
array = (int**)malloc((columns * pitch) + ptrs);
base = (char*)array + ptrs;
for(i = 0; i < rows; i++)
{
    array[i] = (int*)(base + (pitch * i));
}
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Clunky code - see @Amigable's answer for a more elegant and readable solution –  Paul R Jan 5 '12 at 9:44
    
@PaulR: when I posted my answer he hadn't updated his yet, I prefer unwind's answer though –  Necrolis Jan 5 '12 at 9:46
    
@PaulR, thanks. I had to think it through though. :-) –  Prof. Falken Jan 5 '12 at 9:47
    
@Necrolis, I am probably damaged from trying to optimize code on 80s computers. :-) Back then, multiply inside loops were best avoided. –  Prof. Falken Jan 5 '12 at 9:48
1  
@Random832: everything is done using a multiple of sizeof(int), the only alignment problems would come from malloc (which I doubt). –  Necrolis Jan 5 '12 at 14:53

Here's another approach.

If you know the number of columns at compile time, you can do something like this:

#define COLS ... // integer value > 0
...
size_t rows;
int (*arr)[COLS];
...              // get number of rows
arr = malloc(sizeof *arr * rows);
if (arr)
{
  size_t i, j;
  for (i = 0; i < rows; i++)
    for (j = 0; j < COLS; j++)
      arr[i][j] = ...;
}

If you're working in C99, you can use a pointer to a VLA:

size_t rows, cols;
...               // get rows and cols
int (*arr)[cols] = malloc(sizeof *arr * rows);
if (arr)
{
  size_t i, j;
  for (i = 0; i < rows; i++)
    for (j = 0; j < cols; j++)
      arr[i][j] = ...;
}
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I'm not a fan of this "array of pointers to array" to solve the multi dimension array paradigm. Always favored a single dimension array, at access the element with array[ row * cols + col]? No problems encapsulating everything in a class, and implementing a 'at' method.

If you insist on accessing the members of the array with this notation: Matrix[i][j], you can do a little C++ magic. @John solution tries to do it this way, but he requires the number of column to be known at compile time. With some C++ and overriding the operator[], you can get this completely:

class Row
{
private:
    int* _p;

public:
    Row( int* p )                   { _p = p; }
    int& operator[](int col)        { return _p[col]; }
};


class Matrix
{
private:
    int* _p;
    int _cols;

public:
    Matrix( int rows, int cols )  { _cols=cols; _p = (int*)malloc(rows*cols ); }
    Row operator[](int row)       { return _p + row*_cols; }
};

So now, you can use the Matrix object, for example to create a multiplication table:

Matrix mtrx(rows, cols);
for( i=0; i<rows; ++i ) {
    for( j=0; j<rows; ++j ) {
        mtrx[i][j] = i*j;
    }
}

You should now that the optimizer is doing the right thing and there is no call function or any other kind of overhead. No constructor is called. As long as you don't move the Matrix between function, even the _cols variable isn't created. The statement mtrx[i][j] basically does mtrx[i*cols+j].

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