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I just started using Razor instead of the WebForms-ViewEngine. Now in my Razor-View i have something like this:

@{
  int i = 42;
  string text;
  if (i == 42)
  {
    text = "i is 42!";
  }
  else //i is not 42 //<- Error here
  {
    text = "i is something else";
  }
}

I get a warning and at runtime it get an exception in the else line:

Expected a "{" but found a "/". Block statements must be enclosed in "{" and "}". You cannot use single-statement control-flow statements in CSHTML pages.

Apparently the compiler doesn't like comments between the else and the {. I also tried commenting with @* and /*, which gave similar error-messages.

Is there anyway to make a comment in razor like I want it?


Disclaimer:

Yes i know i could fix it simply like this:

@{
  int i = 42;
  string text;
  if (i == 42)
  {
    text = "i is 42!";
  }
  else
  { //i is not 42
    text = "i is something else";
  }
}

However it doesn't fit our coding guidelines and having the comment on the same line makes my intentions more clear.

share|improve this question
1  
Your coding guidelines require you to place a comment on every else statement, containing a negation of the preceding if? What do you do in an if ... else if ... else if ... else chain? –  Richard Everett Jan 5 '12 at 10:39
    
No, just in the last else when the if's check for list of values, that might expand in the future. For instance if(val == Enum.Val1){...} else if(val == Enum.Val2){...} else //must be Enum.Val3, though Val4 might be added in the future –  NULL Jan 5 '12 at 10:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

That's how the Razor parser is built. You could always submit a bug/feature request on MS connect if you don't like the way it is and hope that people will vote for it and it will be fixed/implemented in a future version of the parser. Personally I wouldn't because I don't care (see below why).

This being said, why care? I mean you are not supposed to write code in a Razor page. A Razor page is intended to be used as a view. In ASP.NET MVC a view is used to display some information from the view model that is passed to it from the controller action. Markup primary, mixed with HTML helpers and displaying information from the view model. But C# code is a no no. So what you call code and what you have shown in your question has strictly nothing to do in a Razor view.

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2  
I agree with Darin here. If you have this much code in the view, it means your model is weak. You could easily move this logic into your model. –  ssg Jan 5 '12 at 9:47
    
Hm, my example didn't really show what I tried to do, in my real code I write out text depending on some condition.But you're right it doesn't really matter i just stumbled on this limitation WebForms didn't have, so I though I missed something. –  NULL Jan 5 '12 at 9:50
1  
@NULL, well then move the code from your real example into a helper, controller, model, ... depending on what it is intended to do. –  Darin Dimitrov Jan 5 '12 at 10:00
    
@Darin: I didn't think about that for this relatively simple logic, but it's a great idea. Thanks! –  NULL Jan 5 '12 at 10:03
1  
@DarinDimitrov: just a silly question, I've tried using @**@ comments, in the VS2010 editor there were no error messages, but surprise surprise, when rendering the view it bombs out with the same syntax error. Weren't @**@ comments supposed to be somehow stripped before rendering ? –  BigMike Jan 5 '12 at 10:28

@Darin's points are perfectly valid. In addition to what he said, assuming that your coding guidelines are carved in stone and there can't be any exceptions for Razor coding or any coding in general, there are still some workarounds for this obvious bug in the Razor parser:

0) Move the logic into your model. Hence the code to simply becomes:

string text = Model.Text;

1) For simple expressions you can opt for a ternary operator instead.

string text = (i == 42) ? "some text" : "some other text";

2) You can use a helper function and do an early return like:

int i = 42;
string text = getTextValue(i);
...
@helper string getTextValue(int i)
{
  if(i == 42)
  {
    return "some text";
  }
  return "some other text"; // else eliminated
}

3) You can try /* comment */ style for else lines. I don't think that will work though since it fails in the first slash character already.

share|improve this answer
    
As you suspected 3) doesn't work either. –  NULL Jan 5 '12 at 9:58

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