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Given an unsorted array of size n containing objects with ids of 0 … n-1, sort the array in place and in linear time. Assume that the objects contain large members such as binary data, so instantiating new copies of the objects is prohibitively expensive.

void linearSort(int* input, const int n) {
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        while (input[i] != i) {
            // swap
            int swapPoint = input[i];
            input[i] = input[swapPoint];
            input[swapPoint] = swapPoint;
        }
    }
}

Is this linear? Does this sort work with any kind of array of ints? If so, why do we need quicksort anymore?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Despite the while loop inside the for, this sort is linear O(n). If the while loop occurs multiple times for a given i then for the i values that match swapPoint there will not execute the while loop at all.

This implementation will only work for arrays of ints where there are no duplicates and the values are sequential from 0 to n-1, which is why Quicksort still is relevant being O(n log n) because it works with non-sequential values.

This can be easily tested by making the worst case:

input = new int[] {1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 0};

and then using the following code:

int whileCount = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < n; i++)
{
    while (input[i] != i)
    {
        whileCount++;
        // swap
        int swapPoint = input[i];
        input[i] = input[swapPoint];
        input[swapPoint] = swapPoint;
    }
    Console.WriteLine("for: {0}, while: {1}", i, whileCount);
}

The output will be as follows:

for: 0, while: 9
for: 1, while: 9
for: 2, while: 9
for: 3, while: 9
for: 4, while: 9
for: 5, while: 9
for: 6, while: 9
for: 7, while: 9
for: 8, while: 9
for: 9, while: 9

so you see even in the worst case where you have the while loop run n-1 times in the first iteration of the for loop, you still only get n-1 iterations of the while loop for the entire process.

Further examples with random data:

{7, 1, 2, 4, 3, 5, 0, 6, 8, 9} => 2 on i=0, 1 on i=3 and nothing more. (total 3 while loop runs)
{7, 8, 2, 1, 0, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9} => 7 on i=0 and nothing more (total 7 while loop runs)
{9, 8, 7, 4, 3, 1, 0, 2, 5, 6} => 2 on i=0, 2 on i=1, 1 on i=2, 1 on i=3 (total 6 while loop runs)
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thanks, but i think the while loop may execute multiple times for a specific i, right? for example, [2 0 1 3], when i=0, it will excute while twice: first make it become [1 0 2 3], then make it become [0 1 2 3]. –  JJ Liu Jan 5 '12 at 11:05
1  
That's entirely correct, but the while loop will only run at most n times across the entire for loop. Hence it's O(N) and not more complex. –  Seph Jan 5 '12 at 11:15
    
I have updated my answer with an example showing that the content within the while loop only executes at most n-1 times regardless of the ordering of input beforehand. –  Seph Jan 5 '12 at 11:26

Each you put input[i] to the position swapPoint, which is exactly where it needs to go. So in the following steps those elements are already at the right place and the total time of exchange won't exceed the size n.

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