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I'm trying to get the hang of working "the Scala way" so I was wondering if the following code is how things should be done in this case.

So I have the entities User and Company (mapped with LiftWeb mapper). User has currentUser which contains an Option[User] and Company has currentCompany which is an Option[Company]. In order to compare if the current user is the owner of the current company I'm doing something like:

Company.currentCompany.map{_.owner.get == User.currentUser.map{_.id.get}.openOr(-1) }.openOr(false)

It works but somehow it feels kinda verbose. Is it good? Is it not? Any better ideas? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
It's worth to mention that currentUser and currentCompany are actually Box not Option (Lift's extension of Option). That's why I use openOr and not getOrElse. However, in this simple case it's the same thing. –  Cristian Vrabie Jan 5 '12 at 11:10
    
So currentUser returns an Option[User] and User.id returns an Option[Int] and Company.owner returns an Option[Int]? –  huynhjl Jan 5 '12 at 15:08
    
@huynhjl To be perfectly correct User.currentUser returns Box[User] and User.id returns MappedLongIndex and get on that returns Long. Company.currentCompany goes similarly by returning Box[Company] and Company.owner returns MappedLongForeignKey and get on that returns Long. –  Cristian Vrabie Jan 5 '12 at 16:20
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Using for-comprehension is definitively the solution, actually... or flatMap but less readable

To recall every generators are bound using flatMap function of the Monadic Option, except the last which is mapped (like any for and yield). Here is a good slideshow on the underneath concepts Monad

So the for comprehension is used to pass through all steps while they aren't encoded in the fail state (None for Option).

Here is a full example with four tests (the four basic cases) for each options (for and flatMap)

case class User(id: String) {

}


object User {

  def currentUser(implicit me: Option[User]): Option[User] = me

}

case class Company(owner: Option[User]) {

}


object Company {

  def currentCompany(implicit myCompany: Option[Company]): Option[Company] = myCompany

}

object Test extends App {

  test1()
  test2()
  test3()
  test4()
  test5()
  test6()
  test7()
  test8()

  def test1() {
    implicit val me: Option[User] = None
    implicit val myCompany: Option[Company] = None

    val v: Boolean = (for {
      c <- Company.currentCompany
      u <- User.currentUser
      o <- c.owner if o.id == u.id
    } yield true) getOrElse false

    println(v)
  }

  def test2() {
    implicit val me: Option[User] = Some(User("me"))
    implicit val myCompany: Option[Company] = None

    val v: Boolean = (for {
      c <- Company.currentCompany
      u <- User.currentUser
      o <- c.owner if o.id == u.id
    } yield true) getOrElse false

    println(v)
  }

  def test3() {
    implicit val me: Option[User] = None
    implicit val myCompany = Some(Company(me))

    val v: Boolean = (for {
      c <- Company.currentCompany
      u <- User.currentUser
      o <- c.owner if o.id == u.id
    } yield true) getOrElse false

    println(v)
  }

  def test4() {
    implicit val me: Option[User] = Some(User("me"))
    implicit val myCompany = Some(Company(me))

    val v: Boolean = (for {
      c <- Company.currentCompany
      u <- User.currentUser
      o <- c.owner if o.id == u.id
    } yield true) getOrElse false

    println(v)
  }

  def test5() {
    implicit val me: Option[User] = None
    implicit val myCompany: Option[Company] = None


    val v:Boolean = Company.currentCompany.flatMap(c => User.currentUser.flatMap( u => c.owner.map(o => if (u.id == o.id) true else false))) getOrElse false

    println(v)
  }

  def test6() {
    implicit val me: Option[User] = Some(User("me"))
    implicit val myCompany: Option[Company] = None

    val v:Boolean = Company.currentCompany.flatMap(c => User.currentUser.flatMap( u => c.owner.map(o => if (u.id == o.id) true else false))) getOrElse false

    println(v)
  }

  def test7() {
    implicit val me: Option[User] = None
    implicit val myCompany = Some(Company(me))

    val v:Boolean = Company.currentCompany.flatMap(c => User.currentUser.flatMap( u => c.owner.map(o => if (u.id == o.id) true else false))) getOrElse false

    println(v)
  }

  def test8() {
    implicit val me: Option[User] = Some(User("me"))
    implicit val myCompany = Some(Company(me))

    val v:Boolean = Company.currentCompany.flatMap(c => User.currentUser.flatMap( u => c.owner.map(o => if (u.id == o.id) true else false))) getOrElse false

    println(v)
  }


}
share|improve this answer
    
tl;dr: for comprehensions are just sugar for flatMap; add sugar to taste. –  Dan Burton Jan 5 '12 at 15:55
    
Yes, it's part of my second sentence ;) –  andy petrella Jan 5 '12 at 15:59
    
Comprehensive response :) Thanks! Is there any difference if you place the comparison in the yield block or straight in for, as you did? –  Cristian Vrabie Jan 5 '12 at 16:27
1  
Not at all, it's a matter of choice. I like it in the for since I think it's more clearer to have all tests and generators in the for, and yield only the result... here it is true –  andy petrella Jan 5 '12 at 17:04
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Given:

Case class user(name:String)
Case class company(owner:Option[User])

Val currentcompany=company(Some("Karl"))
Val currentuser=Some(user("Karl"))

Possible solution:

currentcompany.foldLeft(false) { 
  case (a,b) => currentuser.isDefined && b.owner == currentUser.get
}
share|improve this answer
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Have you looked at using for-comprehensions? You could do something like the following:

for(
  company <- Company.currentCompany.map{_.owner};
  user <- User.currentUser.map{_.id}
) yield (company == user).getOrElse(false)

This will return true if Company.currentCompany is Some[value], and User.currentCompany is Some[value], and company.owner == user.id.

I feel there should be some way of getting rid of that getOrElse on the end, and returning the unwrapped boolean directly, hopefully someone else might be able to shed some light on this!

share|improve this answer
1  
Actually I think you can drop the map in the comprehension. for( company <- Company.currentCompany user <- User.currentUser ) yield (company.owner == user).getOrElse(false) –  Cristian Vrabie Jan 5 '12 at 11:11
    
And I think you're right. This does look clearer. It probably compiles to a very similar thing with my code. You can't drop the getOrElse though, but that's how it should be. It's the default for when there's no current user or current company. –  Cristian Vrabie Jan 5 '12 at 11:20
    
.getOrElse(false) is the only sensible choice here. I was about to suggest .isDefined instead, but this loses the result of the equality check. Of course, you don't have to getOrElse right away; it could be useful to pattern match on the None case, which is conceptually distinct from the company != user case. –  Dan Burton Jan 5 '12 at 16:01
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