Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Quick summary of what I'm doing - large website with dreadful custom CMS is expanding to cater for more than one city, they full out refuse to use subdomains and wish to have several cities as follows:

www.example.com/cityx/
www.example.com/cityy/
www.example.com/cityz/

the entire CMS is being moved from the root url to a subfolder and copied for each individual city, the site is written using relative URLs like "/css/style.css" and "/js/jquery.js". I'd modify each file individually but there are over 300 php files I'd have to deal with!

Is there a way in .htaccess to change any relative urls to go to a new root? i.e to have relative paths redirected to www.example.com/cityx/ ?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

I'm not sure exactly what you're trying to achieve, but here is what I know you can do:

Options -Indexes
Options +FollowSymLinks

<IfModule mod_rewrite.c>
RewriteEngine On
RewriteBase /
RewriteRule ^css/(.+)$ cityx/css/$1 [R=302,NC]
</IfModule>

However, I assume that you want each city to have their own css file? In which case I doubt very much if this is possible.

I'm not sure if the tact you're taking is the best way to do this either. You are saying that you are expanding a CMS by just copying it for each city? Would it not be better to integrate the cities into the CMS itself and use htaccess to rewrite the subdirectories (e.g. /cityx /cityy) to their relevant CMS pages (e.g. /index.php?city=cityx) or similar. This isn't the last time you'll have to update something in the CMS I guess, so in the future any changes you make you will have to replicate across all of the cities. Food for thought.

Also, last thought, if a CMS has 300 pages that you have to change just to change the link to the CSS and JS files then its probably a terrible bit of software! No website should have more than one reference to a single CSS or JS file, possibly two or three if there are different header files or something, but to have 300 individual files with these references in is ridiculous. Time to change to some better software. :)

share|improve this answer
    
To be perfectly honest, the client is making this hell for us - we want a quick solution before we run to the hills! The CMS is the most convoluted, nightmarish bit of software I have ever seen in my life. Worst part, we only have a week left of funding to have this done before we go over budget. You're correct that each site has it's own CSS etc, it's not the way I would have done things but we inherited this code from another company who swear by it. If I can't find a .htaccess solution I'll have to try and convince the client to use subdomains –  Kriss 'Caliga' Moeller Jan 5 '12 at 11:35
    
hmm... I doubt there is a way to do this. Because they're relative to the root then by the time htaccess gets control of it then there's no solid way to find out from which city subdirectory the request was made. You might be able to hack something using referrer, but thats where my knowledge ends I'm afraid. A week's worth of funding for this seems a bit short in any case. Might be worth going back to the client, explaining the situation (letting them know that future maintenance will take longer and cost more as a result) and seeing what they say. –  Thomas Clayson Jan 5 '12 at 11:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.