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I have two functions here say animation1 and load1 they work like that:

function animation1() {
    element.animate({width(size)});
}

and

function load1() {
    element.find('img').after(newImg)
}

there's a click event who fires both, but how can I tell to load1 to wait until animation 1 has finished the animation and then add the newImg element? I know I can callback load1 into animate() of animation1, but I've separate one from another because I'm reusing animation1 in a lot of places. What happens now is that both are fired together, and it's not nice to the eyes.

thank you

d.

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In element.animate({width(size)});, you're calling a width function, passing in a size argument, and then trying to put its return value inside {} as a parameter to animate. I'm fairly sure that's a syntax error, did you mean element.animate({width: size});? –  T.J. Crowder Jan 5 '12 at 11:26
    
sure, it's just a quick example. I'm trying to tell to Load1 to wait until animation1 has finished his animation, do his .after method. This in the case that both are fired togheter. –  Daniele Jan 5 '12 at 11:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Two options:

Use a callback

I know you've said

I know I can callback load1 into animate() of animation1, but I've separate one from another because I'm reusing animation1 in a lot of places.

...but a callback really is the best way to do this. In the places where you don't need a callback, just don't pass one to animation1.

Modify animation1 to accept a callback, which it passes to the animate function, which accepts a "completion" callback it fires when the animation is complete:

function animation1(callback) {
    // See also my comment on the question regarding `{width(size)}`
    element.animate({width: size}, callback);
}

...and then your click would pass in a reference to load1 to animation1 rather than calling it directly, like this:

function clickHandler() {
    animation1(load1);
}

See the animate docs for details of the completion function.

Use a timer

If you tell animation1 exactly how long to take, you could use setTimeout to delay your call to load1:

function animation1(duration) {
    // See also my comment on the question regarding `{width(size)}`
    element.animate({width: size}, duration);
}

...and then your click would pass in a duration to animation1 and use setTimeout to delay calling load by the same amount:

function clickHandler() {
    animation1(400);
    setTimeout(load1, 400);
}

Of the two, I'd definitely go for the callback rather than the setTimeout barring some other design constraint.

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after reading all your suggestions I think that using a callback it's the best way to achieve this. Thanks everybody! d. –  Daniele Jan 5 '12 at 11:42

You are "using animation1 in lots of places" but you want it to behave differently in terms of the funciton flow? Souds like you need a separate function animation2 which can include the callback. Reuse is an excellent idea in general, but you are actually doing something different here, because you are animating AND THEN something.

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maybe this could be the case. Thank you. –  Daniele Jan 5 '12 at 11:33

jQuery's animate function has a callback function that you can use for this. You can use it in various different ways. The easiest for the example you've given is probably to use a global variable:

var isAnimating = false;

function animation1(){
  isAnimating = true;
  element.animate({width(size)}, function(){ isAnimating=false; });
}

function load1(){
  if(isAnimating){
    load1(); // call again
  }
  else {
    element.find('img').after(newImg);
  }
}

However this isn't very efficient - load1() will keep running in a perpetual loop until isAnimating is false. A better option is therefore to use the callback to actually call load1...

function animate1(){
  element.animate({width(size)}, function() { load1(); });
}

function load1(){
  element.find('img').after(newImg);
}

This can be expanded incase you need to call different functions for each...

function animate1(callback){
  element.animate({width(size)}, function() {
    var fn = window[callback];
    if(typeof fn === 'function') {
      fn();
    }
  });
}
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