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See also: Is this a good substr() for C?


strtok() and friends skip over empty fields, and I do not know how to tell it not to skip but rather return empty in such cases.

Similar behavior from most tokenizers I could see, and don't even get me started on sscanf() (but then it never said it would work on empty fields to begin with).

I have been on a roll and feeling sleepy as well, so here it goes for review:

char* substr(const char* text, int nStartingPos, int nRun)
{
    char* emptyString = strdup(""); /* C'mon! This cannot fail */

    if(text == NULL) return emptyString;

    int textLen = strlen(text);

    --nStartingPos;

    if((nStartingPos < 0) || (nRun <= 0) || (textLen == 0) || (textLen < nStartingPos)) return emptyString;

    char* returnString = (char *)calloc((1 + nRun), sizeof(char));

    if(returnString == NULL) return emptyString;

    strncat(returnString, (nStartingPos + text), nRun);

    /* We do not need emptyString anymore from this point onwards */
    free(emptyString);
    emptyString = NULL;

    return returnString;
}

int TokenizeC(const char* text, char delim, char ***output)
{
    if((*output) != NULL) return -1; /* I will allocate my own storage */

    int nCountOfDelimiters = 0;
    int dx = 0;
    int nCountOfElements = 0;
    int textLen = strlen(text);

    for(; dx < textLen; ++dx)
    {
        if((text[dx] == delim) && (dx != (textLen - 1))) ++nCountOfDelimiters;
        /* trailing delimiter need not be counted separately as we are */
        /* incrementing the count always by 1 */
    }

    /*
    We will have as many array elements as nCountOfDelimiters + 1
    Tokenizing an empty string should return a single token that would
    be empty (Is this not how most libraries behave? Or should it return NULL?)
    */

    (*output) = (char **)malloc((1 + nCountOfDelimiters) * sizeof(char *));

    for(dx = 0; dx < textLen; dx++)
    {
    	int nStartOfString = (1 + dx);

    	//printf("\n[! 1]dx = %d, nStartOfString = %d", dx, nStartOfString);

    	/* Get the run between delimiters */
    	while((dx < textLen) && (text[dx] != delim)) dx++;

    	//printf("\n[! 2]dx = %d, nStartOfString = %d", dx, nStartOfString);

    	(*output)[nCountOfElements] = (1 + dx - nStartOfString) ? substr(text, nStartOfString, (1 + dx - nStartOfString)) : strdup("");

    	//printf("\n[!]substr(text, %d, %d) => '%s'", nStartOfString, (1 + dx - nStartOfString), (*output)[nCountOfElements]);

    	if(NULL == (*output)[nCountOfElements])
    	{
    		// Woops! Undo all
    		// TODO: How to test this scenario?!

    		for(; nCountOfElements >= 0; --nCountOfElements)
    		{
    		    if((*output)[nCountOfElements] != NULL) free((*output)[nCountOfElements]);
    		    (*output)[nCountOfElements] = NULL;
    		}

    		return -2; 
    	}

    	++nCountOfElements;
    }

    return nCountOfElements; /* Return the number of tokens if sucessful */
}

void reclaim2D(char ***store, unsigned int itemCount)
{
    for (int x = 0; itemCount < itemCount; ++x)
    {
        if((*store)[x] != NULL) free((*store)[x]);
        (*store)[x] = NULL;
    }

    if((*store) != NULL) free((*store));
    (*store) = NULL;
}

Here's the driver:

int main()
{
    // Trailing '-' scenarios not giving correct count of elements
    // (off by 1 for the last element that should come as empty)

    const char *text = "1-2-3-6-7-8-9-10-11-", delim = '-'; // 10 elements

    char **output = NULL;

    int c = TokenizeC(text, delim, &output);

    printf("\n\n[*]%d", c);

    for (int x = 0; x < c; ++x)
    {
        printf("\n[main]'%s'", output[x]); //Expected : 1-2-3-6-7-8-9-10-11-<empty>
    }

    reclaim2D(&output, c);

    text = "12-3-6-7-8-9-10-11";  // 8 elements

    c = TokenizeC(text, delim, &output);

    printf("\n\n[*]%d", c);

    for(int x = 0; x < c; ++x)
    {
        printf("\n[main]'%s'", output[x]); //Expected : 12-3-6-7-8-9-10-11
    }

    reclaim2D(&output, c);

    text = "-----2--4--6-7100000000-8-9-10-11-100000000-";  // 17 elements

    c = TokenizeC(text, delim, &output);

    printf("\n\n[*]%d", c);

    for(int x = 0; x < c; ++x)
    {
        printf("\n[main]'%s'", output[x]);
        //Expected <empty>-<empty>-<empty>-<empty>
        // -<empty>-2-<empty>-4-<empty>-6-7100000000
        // -8-9-10-11-100000000-<empty>
    }

    reclaim2D(&output, c);

    text = "-----2--4--6-7100000000-8-9-10-11-100000000";  // 16 elements

    c = TokenizeC(text, delim, &output);

    printf("\n\n[*]%d", c);

    for(int x = 0; x < c; ++x)
    {
        printf("\n[main]'%s'", output[x]);
        //Expected : <empty>-<empty>-<empty>-<empty>-<empty>
        //-2-<empty>-4-<empty>-6-7100000000-8-9-10-11-100000000
    }

    reclaim2D(&output, c);

    return 0;
}

Yes, you noticed it right; it works now only for a single delimiter, but of course, we have this off by one bug to attend to.

Outputs:

[*]9
[main]'1'
[main]'2'
[main]'3'
[main]'6'
[main]'7'
[main]'8'
[main]'9'
[main]'10'
[main]'11'

[*]8
[main]'12'
[main]'3'
[main]'6'
[main]'7'
[main]'8'
[main]'9'
[main]'10'
[main]'11'

[*]16
[main]''
[main]''
[main]''
[main]''
[main]''
[main]'2'
[main]''
[main]'4'
[main]''
[main]'6'
[main]'7100000000'
[main]'8'
[main]'9'
[main]'10'
[main]'11'
[main]'100000000'

[*]16
[main]''
[main]''
[main]''
[main]''
[main]''
[main]'2'
[main]''
[main]'4'
[main]''
[main]'6'
[main]'7100000000'
[main]'8'
[main]'9'
[main]'10'
[main]'11'
[main]'100000000'

I am also making this a wiki because I saw many similar requests on the net.

share|improve this question
1  
strdup() on an empty string can fail. It most often won't - you're correct. But if the program your code is embedded in has been running for a year, it may have run out of space so that even that simple call will fail. –  Jonathan Leffler May 17 '09 at 16:26
1  
The definition of field for strtok() and friends precludes the possibility of 'empty fields'. If you attempt to use them when you want a single separator character, you need to use a separate function. But blaming a function for not doing what you want when it is not designed to do what you want is not sensible. –  Jonathan Leffler May 17 '09 at 16:31
    
Hi Jonathan! I was not blaming anything - the functionality is as per definition of course, but I was wondering how skipping over empty fields instead of returning an empty token could possibly be useful. Empty fields returned by a function can be ignored, but a value never returned cannot be acted upon at all! –  PoorLuzer May 18 '09 at 6:50
1  
Of course, the real reason not to use strtok() is that it's implemented using static (i.e. global) buffers internally. You have to be sure that you'll only ever call it in a single-threaded context. There is a more recent (but probably less portable) version called strtok_r, which is re-entrant. –  Mike Mueller May 21 '09 at 4:37

1 Answer 1

On some system, there is a function called strsep(). And you can find its source code by google. For example, http://www.google.com/codesearch/p?hl=zh-TW#XAzRy8oK4zA/libc/string/strsep.c&q=strsep

share|improve this answer
    
odd that there is no strsep_r though –  John La Rooy Oct 12 '09 at 2:07

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