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//edit 5 when the i use only these 2 lines

  index :: [String] -> [String] -> Bool
  index a b = and [x `elem` a |x <- b]

it works fine!!!!

eg:

index ["asd","asdd","dew"] ["asdd","asdad"]

False

But when i use the entire code mentioned below

empty [] = True
empty _ = False

    index a b = do
             if empty a
              then do putStrLn "a is empty"
                      else return ()
             if empty b
              then do putStrLn "b is empty"
                      else return ()
        where
          index :: [String] -> [String] -> Bool
          index a b = and [x `elem` a |x <- b]

theres no output!! and thats the issue i got!!

//edit 6

index a b = do index'
         if empty a
          then do putStrLn "a is empty"
                  else return ()
         if empty b
          then do putStrLn "b is empty"
                  else return ()
    where
      index' :: [String] -> [String] -> Bool
      index' a b = and [x `elem` a |x <- b]

thanks

share|improve this question
    
"the last line which is the main function of the program works fine without the nested if above": It won't, index' won't even type check... –  Porges May 17 '09 at 8:49
    
Regarding your edit: both snippets work fine, I don't get an 'unexpected symbol' error. However, you have given two functions the same name, this way you can't call the second index from the first. –  Tom Lokhorst May 17 '09 at 10:52
    
Which of your question have already been answered now? –  Dario May 17 '09 at 11:18
    
please refer edit 4. thats the question i need to ask. –  pier May 17 '09 at 11:23
    
What should index do now? Should it check whether who lists are empty and make some output or should it check wheter b is a subset of a? –  Dario May 17 '09 at 11:26
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4 Answers

This is a little off-topic since maybe you are trying to learn the layout rule and how to nest ifs, but the code you show in revision 6 is just using if to do error checking. I would just do the error checking via pattern matching instead of if.

index [] _ = putStrLn "a is empty"
index _ [] = putStrLn "b is empty"
index a b = putStrLn (show index')
    where index' = and [x `elem` a | x <- b]

(You don't need the return () after putStrLn because it already returns () for you.)

Pattern matching is a lot easier to get right because it doesn't require a lot of indentation, etc.


Edit:

I changed the definition of index' a little from yours. In my version it's a local variable instead of a local function. In Haskell, there's not much difference, it's just that index' uses a and b from the surrounding index function, so it doesn't need to take parameters. (Admittedly, index' is not such a good name for a variable.)

Also I left off the type annotation because I don't usually write them. But they are helpful when something isn't working. Here is what it would look like:

    where index' :: Bool
          index' = and [x `elem` a | x <- b]
share|improve this answer
    
short and doesn't have to worry about identation. thanks –  pier May 17 '09 at 15:14
    
why dont i need to define the type like index' :: [String] -> [String] -> Bool –  pier May 17 '09 at 15:16
    
The compiler generally can deduce the types automatically, so you don't need to declare them manually if you don't want to. But it's usually better to declare them because it helps to find the problematic code in case of type errors. In this case you could declare the type of index as "[String] -> [String] -> IO ()" or more generally as "(Eq a) => [a] -> [a] -> IO ()". –  sth May 18 '09 at 0:22
add comment

An if construct in Haskell is a expression. That means it must always evaluate to a value, so the else part is mandatory.

Also, the first part of if must be a boolean, so you can't call index' there, since that returns a [Int], not a Bool.

I would say, start with something like this:

if isEmpty a
then putStrLn "a is empty"
else if isEmpty b
     then putStrLn "b is empty"
     else putStrLn "neither are empty"
share|improve this answer
    
ok, well i tried it this way and i still get an error as "Syntax error in expression (unexpected `}', possibly due to bad layout) " index as bs = if isEmpty as then putStrLn "a is empty" else if isEmpty bs then putStrLn "b is empty" else putStrLn "neither are empty" where index' :: [String] -> [String] -> [Int] index' as bs = index' True [(elem a bs) | a <- as] –  pier May 17 '09 at 9:10
    
You'll need do to sequence the outputs. –  Dario May 17 '09 at 9:19
1  
Than you probably do have a problem with your layout. Make sure the then and else keywords are indented to at least the level of the if keyword. In your current question, the else is indented wrong. Also, make sure you only use spaces for layout, tabs will mess thing up. –  Tom Lokhorst May 17 '09 at 9:20
    
@Dario, the you don't really need do syntax in this example. In this case, the expression will be of type IO (), because putStrLn is of that type. do syntax is just syntax sugar if you want to bind multiple expressions, but that's not necessary here. –  Tom Lokhorst May 17 '09 at 9:25
    
I'll have to bind multiple expressions - The programm may output a is empty b is empty –  Dario May 17 '09 at 9:47
show 1 more comment
index a b = if index' [] bs
                       then putStrLn "a is empty"
                       if index' a []          
                        then putStrLn "b is empty"
                        else                  
    where 
        index' :: [String] -> [String] -> [Int]
        index' a b = index' True [(elem x b) | x <- a]

If you indent your statement like this you'll see that the first if has no matching else clause.

Also, else clause doesn't return anything — a function should have a return value under all circumstances.

share|improve this answer
add comment

IO operations in Haskell are a bit difficult because they need so called monads You would need a special do-notion here to sequence the outputs.

Write it like this:

empty [] = True
empty _ = False

index a b = do
         if empty a
          then do putStrLn "a is empty"
		  else return ()
         if empty b
          then do putStrLn "b is empty"
		  else return ()

Or Maybe you could just return the strings and use putStrLn separately. You index' must return a boolean value when it should be used as an if condition!

share|improve this answer
    
What's wrong with this? –  Dario May 17 '09 at 9:04
    
thanks it worked fine! –  pier May 17 '09 at 9:21
    
You won't need the do syntax here, if you remove all the dos, your code will still work. –  Tom Lokhorst May 17 '09 at 9:26
1  
Oh, right, I didn't read your code properly. You are right, you need the outer do. Btw, there is also a function for if b then something else return () called when. You can use it like so: when (empty a) (putStrLn "a is empty"). It is in the Control.Monad module. –  Tom Lokhorst May 17 '09 at 9:51
1  
You will need do notation to sequence the two calls to when. –  Tom Lokhorst May 17 '09 at 10:09
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