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Eclipse says that the instanceof operation is not allowed with Type Parameter due to generic type eraser.

I agree that at runtime, no type information stays. But consider the following generic declaration of class :

class SomeClass<T>{
    T t;
    SomeClass(Object o){
        System.out.println(o instanceof T);   // Illegal
    }   
}        

At runtime, no T would be present! But if I instantiate this class of type Integer, then the corresponding object will have a field t of type Integer.

Then, why can't I check the type of a variable with T which can be replaced by Integer at runtime. And I would be actually doing something like "o instanceof Integer".

Under which cases, allowing instanceof with a Type Parameter can cause trouble so that it is prohibited?

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6  
You've already said "At runtime, no T would be present", so it sounds like you're already aware of type erasure. So I'm not sure why you're confused about this behaviour? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 5 '12 at 11:49
1  
Just because its not allowed doesnt mean it can cause rouble. T is a generic type and can in fact be about anything, using it instanceof just doent make any sense. –  Peter Jan 5 '12 at 11:52
    
possible duplicate of Java: Instanceof and Generics –  millimoose Jan 5 '12 at 11:56

6 Answers 6

But if I instantiate this class of type Integer, then the corresponding object will have a field t of type Integer

No, it won't. It will have a field of type Object. Just everytime you access it, it will be cast to an Integer.

Consider the following code:

SomeClass<Integer> c = new SomeClass<Integer>();
SomeClass untyped = (SomeClass)c; // Which type was it?
SomeClass<String> stringTyped = (SomeClass<String>)untyped; // Now it's STRING??

Works. Gives you a bunch of compiler warnings, but works. Because the field T is actually of type Object and can be cast to anything.

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If you need T at runtime, you need to provide it at runtime. This is often done by passing the Class<T> which T has to be.

class SomeClass<T> {
    final T t;

    public SomeClass(Class<T> tClass, T t) {
        if(!tClass.isAssignableFrom(t.getClass()) throw new IllegalArgumentException("Must be a " + tClass);
        this.t = t;
    }

    private SomeClass(T t) {
        this.t = t;
    }

    public static <T> SomeClass<T> of(Class<T> tClass, T t) {
        if(!tClass.isAssignableFrom(t.getClass()) throw new IllegalArgumentException("Must be a " + tClass);
        return new SomeClass(t);
    }
} 

// doesn't compile
SomeClass<Integer> intSomeClass = SomeClass.of(Integer.class, "one");

Class clazz = Integer.class;
// compiles with a warning and throws an IAE at runtime.
SomeClass<Integer> intSomeClass = (SomeClass<Integer>) SomeClass.of(clazz, "one");

// compiles and runs ok.
SomeClass<Integer> intSomeClass = SomeClass.of(Integer.class, 1);
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After compiling statement o instanceof T would be o instanceof Object and because all types derives from Object, it will always evaluate to true. Allowing this kind of tests would give false positive results

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Because of type erasure, this never works. At runtime, you only know that your class has a type parameter T, but not which type it is for a given instance. So you can't determine whether an object is of type T to begin with, because you don't know what T is, not because it would cause some sort of trouble.

If you need to do this sort of runtime check, pass a type token to your object explicitly:

SomeClass(Object o, Class<T> type) {
    System.out.println(type.isInstance(o));
}
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1  
it would be simpler to write type.isInstance(o) –  newacct Jan 6 '12 at 7:19
    
Indeed it is, I was doing the code example from memory. –  millimoose Jan 7 '12 at 22:02

But if I instantiate this class of type Integer, then the corresponding object will have a field t of type Integer.

Actually, it wouldn't. It'd have a field t of type Object. As you've said, generics are almost entirely syntactic sugar (the exception is that when you extend a generic class and specify a type parameter, the type remains as metadata in the class file).

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The generic type arguments are not known at runtime, so there is no class you can compare with. T is only known at compile time. Generics do only help the developer to write code easier. But at runtime, the arguments are just Object instances.

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