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I want to return the value from a function called in shell script. Perhaps I am missing the syntax. I tried using the global variables. But that is also not working. The code is:

lockdir="somedir"
test() {
    retval=""

    if mkdir "$lockdir"
        then    # directory did not exist, but was created successfully
            echo >&2 "successfully acquired lock: $lockdir"
            retval="true"
        else
            echo >&2 "cannot acquire lock, giving up on $lockdir"
            retval="false"
    fi
    return retval
}


retval=test()
if [ "$retval" == "true" ]
    then
        echo "directory not created"
    else
        echo "directory already created"
fi
share|improve this question
    
Not related to your question, but anyway... if you are trying to get a lock you may use "lockfile" command. –  Víctor Herraiz Nov 25 '14 at 11:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 51 down vote accepted

A bash function can't return a string directly like you want it to. You can do three things:

  1. echo a string
  2. return an exit status, which is a number, not a string
  3. share a variable

This is also true for some other shells.

Here's how to do each of those options:

1. echo strings

lockdir="somedir"
testlock(){
    retval=""
    if mkdir "$lockdir"
    then # directory did not exist, but was created successfully
         echo >&2 "successfully acquired lock: $lockdir"
         retval="true"
    else
         echo >&2 "cannot acquire lock, giving up on $lockdir"
         retval="false"
    fi
    echo "$retval"
}

retval=$( testlock )
if [ "$retval" == "true" ]
then
     echo "directory not created"
else
     echo "directory already created"
fi 

2. return exit status

lockdir="somedir"
testlock(){
    if mkdir "$lockdir"
    then # directory did not exist, but was created successfully
         echo >&2 "successfully acquired lock: $lockdir"
         retval=0
    else
         echo >&2 "cannot acquire lock, giving up on $lockdir"
         retval=1
    fi
    return "$retval"
}

testlock
retval=$?
if [ "$retval" == 0 ]
then
     echo "directory not created"
else
     echo "directory already created"
fi 

3. share variable

lockdir="somedir"
retval=-1
testlock(){
    if mkdir "$lockdir"
    then # directory did not exist, but was created successfully
         echo >&2 "successfully acquired lock: $lockdir"
         retval=0
    else
         echo >&2 "cannot acquire lock, giving up on $lockdir"
         retval=1
    fi
}

testlock
if [ "$retval" == 0 ]
then
     echo "directory not created"
else
     echo "directory already created"
fi 
share|improve this answer
    
First approach gives the message: $ ./test.sh ./test.sh: command substitution: line 15: syntax error near unexpected token )' ./test.sh: command substitution: line 15: test() )' directory already created –  Mridul Vishal Jan 5 '12 at 13:26
    
second approach gives the message: $ ./test.sh ./test.sh: line 15: syntax error near unexpected token retval=$?' ./test.sh: line 15: retval=$?' –  Mridul Vishal Jan 5 '12 at 13:28
    
OK replaced test() by test. Try again please. –  olibre Jan 5 '12 at 13:30
    
Also in the first example echo retval should be echo $retval –  dimir Jan 5 '12 at 13:35
1  
In the second example, rather than assigning from $?, it is more idiomatic to write "if testlock; then ..." –  William Pursell Jan 5 '12 at 16:25

You are working way too hard. Your entire script should be:

if mkdir $lockdir 2> /dev/null; then 
  echo lock acquired
else
  echo could not acquire lock >&2
fi

but even that is probably too verbose. I would code it:

mkdir $lockdir || exit 1

but the resulting error message is a bit obscure.

share|improve this answer

If it's just a true/false test, have your function return 0 for success, and return 1 for failure. The test would then be:

if function_name; then
  do something
else
  error condition
fi
share|improve this answer
    
Exactly what I was looking for. –  Samuel Mar 6 at 2:46

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