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I have methods like this:

public File method1(){
    method2()
}

public method2(){
do something..
and get method1 return type(in this case File)
}

How do I get it? i tried like this..

Throwable t = new Throwable();
StackTraceElement[] elements = t.getStackTrace();

and get all the methods for the elements. And after that, getReturnType, but it doesn't work. I also tried

public File method1(){
    method2(this.getClass());
}

public method2(Class<?> className){
   //problem here
}

But here the problem is that i can't compare two elements, the one on the stack and the one from classname.getMethods().

Is there any way that I can send method return type to a method2? I need this because of making some history-like log. I know it can be done with aspectJ but I have to do it somehow like this.

EDIT:

The main problem I have is that I can get stack output, and see the method who called my method2 - that's one fragment I need! Also I need that method's return type, but the stack doesnt hold that information. Now, I can get all the methods from the class where the "method who called method2" is. The list of those methods, hold everything, return type, input parameters.. but that's a pretty big list, 63 methods. So I have to compare them somehow to find out which one is the one FROM STACK. I can't comapre them using name, because some differ with return type, hashcode is different - that's where I'm stuck.

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2  
can you provide the exact source code where your problem happens? this is a bit too much pseudo code for debugging –  light_303 Jan 5 '12 at 13:16
    
I have a method like this in Class1 public File add(File file,Person person){ //operations operationHistory(); } In class2, i have a method like this public operationHistory(){ //it needs to have this: //get the class who called this method //get the method in that class //get the return type of that method } –  zevonja Jan 5 '12 at 13:22
    
Add that to the question body, don't paste large chunks of code in the comments, please. –  Daniel Fischer Jan 5 '12 at 13:36
    
Please take the time to look at what you've typed and clean up the worst of the typos. You seem to be using ` instead of ', which is causing all kinds of formatting fun. There's also a reason we use capitalization and punctuation when trying to communicate clearly. –  T.J. Crowder Jan 5 '12 at 13:56

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Update

If you really need to do this from a stack trace (which I would strongly recommend avoiding), I don't think you can. The stack trace can tell you the class and method names, but it doesn't include the method's argument types, and so if the method is overloaded you can't tell which one called method2.

I recommend you revisit your design. If method2 needs to know the return type of the method that calls it, then the method in question should pass that information into method2. Attempting to gather that information from a runtime stack is not only inefficient, but it's a design red flag.

Example:

public File method1(File f) {
    // ...

    method2(File.class);
}

public String method1(String s) {
    // ...

    method2(String.class);
}

public Foo method1(Foo f) {
    // ...

    method2(Foo.class);
}

There we have three overloads of method1. This is not a problem for method2, because each of them tells method2 what its return type is — or more accurately, I hope, what it needs method2 to create for it or whatever.

Original answer

For the specific case you list (esp. toward the end of your question), you can do this:

public File method1(){
    method2(File.class);
}

File.class is the Class instance for the File class.

For the general case of finding the type of the return value of a method in a class, you can use the reflection API. Get the Class instance for the class containing the method via Class.forName, look up the method on that Class instance using Class#getMethod, then use Method#getReturnType on that Method to find out the return type's class.

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That doesnt help me,because method2 has to accept different types of input parameters,and yes i already checked reflection api and couldnt find the awnser.. that`s why i aksed the question here –  zevonja Jan 5 '12 at 13:18
    
@user1132203: You understand that the type of input parameter to method2 would be Class, not File, right? So in this case, method1 might pass in File.class but another method might pass in String.class and another Foo.class. I've added links to the specific reflection calls you'd need for the general case as well. –  T.J. Crowder Jan 5 '12 at 13:20
    
WHen using class.ForName,i dont need to pass the class from the method1.. look at the method.. let me try explaining differently.. I take stacktraceelements.. StackTraceElement[] elements = t.getStackTrace(); Class tempClass = elements[1].getClass().forName(elements[1].getClassName()); now i KNOW that elements[1].getMethod is the name of the method i need to have,but i can`t get that method return type.. so i go with for each with tempClass.getMethods.. –  zevonja Jan 5 '12 at 13:34
    
and i See that method in that list BUT there is no way i can compare elements[1] with the method that got listed with tempClass.getMethod,which holds the information of returnType. Did you get me? –  zevonja Jan 5 '12 at 13:36
    
@user1132203: My point is that you don't need to generate a stack trace (which is non-trivial work) at all. But yes, if you use a StackTraceElement, then you can use StackTraceElement#getClassName and StackTraceElement#getMethodName. You'll have some trouble looking up the method from just the name, though, since methods can be overridden. That's why I pointed you at Class#getMethod, which you can use to look up any specific version of the overridden method. –  T.J. Crowder Jan 5 '12 at 13:37

Why is it so difficult with reflection?

public File method1() {
    method2()
}

public void method2() {
    Class<?> returnType = this.getClass().getMethod("method1").getReturnType();
}

Of course, you'll have to handle the exceptions though.

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If the class you are returning has an empty constructor, you could build a instance of the return type locally in method2() and use that, but that is dangerous and not generic.

You could do x.getClass().getName() and perform a switch operation.

What I would suggest, though, is that you consider rearchitecting this to use AspectJ and put a cut point in your parent call to collect the information you really want before you get too low in the stack. I'm guessing a little bit as to your intent, but any time you are parsing the stack output for type information I think the design deserves a second look.

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i said in the first post,i know it can be done with aspectJ,but for some other reasons,i have to do it like this.. basically the main problem i have is how do i compare the method i get with stack output and the methods i get with .getClass.getMethods.. and when i find a match,i take the signature from the method i found in class.getMethods.. because the one on stack doesnt hold that information –  zevonja Jan 5 '12 at 13:48
    
I apologize for not catching your last sentence. I think you have your answer, then. If you can't use AspectJ I suspect you also can't use the Java Tools Interface: docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/guide/jvmti/jvmti.html#whatIs –  sam Jan 5 '12 at 13:55

Updated answer

Using combination of StackTrace and Reflection

import java.io.File;
import java.lang.reflect.Method;
import java.util.ArrayList;
import java.util.Vector;

public class CallingMethodReturnType
{
    public static void main( String[] args )
    {
        CallingMethodReturnType app = new CallingMethodReturnType();
        app.method1();
        app.method3();
    }

    public File method1(){
        method2();
        return null;
    }

    public ArrayList method3(){
        method4();
        return null;
    }

    public Vector method4() {
        method2();
        return null;
    }

    public void method2(){
        Method method;
        try {
            StackTraceElement[] stackTraceElements = Thread.currentThread().getStackTrace();
            StackTraceElement ste = stackTraceElements[2];
            String callerMethodName = ste.getMethodName();
            method = this.getClass().getMethod(callerMethodName, null);
            Class returnType = method.getReturnType();
            System.out.println(returnType);
        } catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }

    }
}

Also check question In Java, how do i find the caller of a method using stacktrace or reflection? if you are concerned with performance.

Original answer

You can use reflection API like this

    public method2(){
     //do something and get method1 return type(in this case File)
     Method method = this.getClass().getMethod("method1", null);
     Class returnType = method.getReturnType();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
method2,may be called with different other methods.. and i need to know WHICH method,and the RETURN TYPE of method who called method2.. –  zevonja Jan 5 '12 at 13:45

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