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I have a data file containing two columns, like

1.1 2.2
3.1 4.5
1.2 4.5
3.2 4.6
1.1 2.3
4.2 4.9
4.2 1.1

I would like to make a histogram from the two columns, i.e. to get this output (if the step size (or bin size, as we talking about histogramming) equals to 0.1 in this case)

1.0 1.0 0
1.0 1.1 0
1.0 1.2 0
...
1.1 1.0 0
1.1 1.1 0
1.1 1.2 0
...
1.1 2.0 0
1.1 2.1 0
1.1 2.2 1
...
...

Can anybody suggest me something? It would be nice, if I can set the the range of values of the colmuns. In the above case the 1st column values goes from 1 to 4, and the same as for the second column.

EDITED: updated in order to handle more general data input, e.g. float numbers. The step size in the above case is 0.1, but it would be nice if it can be tunable for other settings, i.e. if step range (bin size) is for example 0.2, or 1.0. If the step size is for example 1.0, then if I have 1.1 and 1.8 they have the same bin, we have to handle them together, for example (the range in this case let us say 4 for both of the two columns 0.0 ... 4.0)

1.1 1.8
2.5 2.6
1.4 2.1
1.3 1.5
3.3 4.0
3.8 3.9
4.0 3.2
4.0 4.0

output (if the bin size = 1.0)

1 1 2
1 2 1
1 3 0
1 4 0

2 1 0
2 2 1
2 3 0
2 4 0

3 1 0
3 2 0
3 3 1
3 4 1

4 1 0
4 2 0
4 3 1
4 4 1
share|improve this question
    
Shouldn't the histogram of 4 1 be 1? –  fge Jan 5 '12 at 13:48
    
Yes, of course, I did a mistake, sorry... –  user1116360 Jan 5 '12 at 13:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
awk 'END {
  for (i = 0; ++i <= l;) {
    for (j = 0; ++j <= l;)
      printf "%d %d %d %s\n", i, j, \
        b[i, j], (j < l ? x : ORS) 
    }
  }
{
  f[NR] = $1; s[NR] = $2
  b[$1, $2]++
  }' l=4 infile

You may try this (not thoroughly tested):

awk -v l=4 -v bs=0.1 'BEGIN {
  if (!bs) {   
   print "invalid bin size" > "/dev/stderr"
   exit
    }
  split(bs, t, ".")
  t[2] || fl++
  m = "%." length(t[2]) "f" 
  }
{
  fk = fl ? int($1) : sprintf(m, $1)
  sk = fl ? int($2) : sprintf(m, $2)
  f[fk]; s[sk]; b[fk, sk]++
  }

END {
  if (!bs) exit 1

  for (i = 1; int(i) <= l; i += bs) {
    for (j = 1; int(j) <= l; j += bs) {
      if (fl) {
        fk = int(i); sk = int(j); m = "%d"
        }
      else {
        fk = sprintf(m, i); sk = sprintf(m, j)
        }     
      printf "%s" m OFS m OFS "%d\n", (i > 1 && fk != p ? ORS : x), fk, sk, b[fk, sk]
      p = fk        
      }
    }
  }'  infile
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, nice! How can I tune it in a way that it can be capable to use float numbers, i.e. for example 1.45, 3.1230, 2.101, ...etc. ? –  user1116360 Jan 5 '12 at 14:07
    
Hi @user1116360, which awk version are you using? The solution will depend on your awk implementation. –  Dimitre Radoulov Jan 5 '12 at 14:42
    
Hi Dimitre, awk version: GNU Awk 3.1.6 on Ubuntu 10.04 LTS –  user1116360 Jan 5 '12 at 14:44
    
Hi @user1116360, could you also post sample data and an example of the desired output with floating point numbers? I mean, if you have 1, 1.2, 3 in the first column what should be the range: 1, 1.2, 2, 3 or 1, 1.2, 2, 2.2, 3, 3.2 ... ? –  Dimitre Radoulov Jan 5 '12 at 14:57
    
Hi, I have updated my post. See the new, edited one above! –  user1116360 Jan 5 '12 at 15:23

You can try this in bash:

for x in {1..4} ; do
    for y in {1..4} ; do
        echo $x%$y 0
    done
done \
| join -1 1 -2 2 - -a1 <(sed 's/ /%/' FILE \
                         | sort \
                         | uniq -c \
                         | sort -k2 ) \
| sed 's/ 0 / /;s/%/ /'

It creates the table with all zeros in the last column, joins it with the real results (classic frequency table sort | uniq -c) and removes the zeros from the lines where a different number should be shown.

share|improve this answer
    
Very complicated, fgrep can handle this in a much easier way, see my answer –  fge Jan 5 '12 at 13:57
    
@fge: I've seen it. You are calling fgrep many times which can make the script slower for longer tables. –  choroba Jan 5 '12 at 14:05
    
Well, you call sed, then join, then sort, then uniq, then sort, then sed again ;) –  fge Jan 5 '12 at 14:09
    
@fge: Yeah. And that's it, 6 calls for a table of any size. You have 4*4=16 calls to fgrep even for 4x4. –  choroba Jan 5 '12 at 14:24

One solution in perl (sample output and usage to follow):

#!/usr/bin/perl -W
use strict;

my ($min, $step, $max, $file) = @ARGV
    or die "Syntax: $0 <min> <step> <max> <file>\n";

my %seen;

open F, "$file"
    or die "Cannot open file $file: $!\n";

my @l = map { chomp; $_}  qx/seq $min $step $max/;

foreach my $first (@l) {
    foreach my $second (@l) {
        $seen{"$first $second"} = 0;
    }
}

foreach my $line (<F>) {
    chomp $line;
    $line or next;
    $seen{$line}++;
}

my $len = @l; # size of list
my $i = 0;

foreach my $key (sort keys %seen) {
    printf("%s %d\n", $key, $seen{$key});
    $i++;
    print "\n" unless $i % $len;
}

exit(0);
share|improve this answer
    
What if I have "float" numbers, 1.4 5.4 23.14,...etc. Can we tune it according to this requirement? –  user1116360 Jan 5 '12 at 14:01
    
As I said, this is very tied to your data, if your data set is more general than this, can you edit your question to describe the whole problem set?* –  fge Jan 5 '12 at 14:08
    
OK, removing my answer since I cannot do anything if the whole problem set is not described. –  fge Jan 5 '12 at 14:42
    
There, you have it! Output with integers and decimals to follow... –  fge Jan 5 '12 at 15:50
    
After the fixes, it should fully answer your needs –  fge Jan 5 '12 at 15:57

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