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I have an application that takes a dictionary of files (file type, and list of file names) and copies the files from the original directory into another location. I've already got the basic code for the copy process, but I need to do some unit tests so it is as robust as possible.

I have wrapper class that I am using so I can test that the System.IO methods are called as I expect, but I am having some difficulty figuring out how to form the tests as there are foreach and switch statements in the code. Sample code below:

private IFileSystemIO _f;


public CopyFilesToDestination(IFileSystemIO f){
    _f = f;
}


public void Cpy_Files(Dictionary<string, List<string>> files)
{
// get a list of the file types in the directory
var listOfFileTypes = new List<string>(files.Keys);

foreach (var fileType in listOfFileTypes){
    var fileList = files[fileType].ToList();

    foreach  (var file in fileList){
        switch(fileType){
            case ".txt":
                _f.Copy(file, @"c:\destination\text");
                break;
            case ".dat":
                _.Copy(file, @"c:\destination\data");
                break;
        }
    }
}
}

To test the above I had thought I would use a mock dictionary object, set up with a list of file types and paths:

public virtual Dictionary<string, List<string>> FakeFiles(){
    return fakeDictionary = new Dictionary<string, List<string>>(){
        {".txt",  new List<string>(){
            "c:\test\file1.txt",
                "c:\test\file2.txt"
            }
        },
        {".dat", new List<string>(){
                "c:\test\file1.dat",
                "c:\test\file2.dat"
            }
        };
    }
}

The first test I came up with looks like this:

[Test]
public void Should_Copy_Text_Files(){
    var dictionary = new FakeDictionary().FakeFiles();

    var mockObject = MockRepository.GenerateMock<IFileSystemIO>();
    var systemUnderTest = new CopyFileToDestination(mockObject);

    systemUnderTest.Cpy_Files(dictionary);

    // I think this means "test the operation, don't check the values in the arguments"      but I also think I'm wrong
    mockObject.AssertWasCalled(f => f.Copy("something", "something"), o =>     o.IgnoreArguments());

}

My first problem is: How do I test for a specific file type, such as ".txt"? Then how do I test the loops? I know with the mocked dictionary that I only have two items, do I leverage this to form the test? How?

I think I may be close to a solution, but I am running out of time/patience hunting it down. Any help is greatly appreciated. Thanks Jim

share|improve this question
    
How are you determining what the file type is in your Switch statement.. the wrapper code that you are writing looks a bit bloated.. if you want to test if a file has a particular extenstion or not why not make that part of the switch statement on the filename being passed in by using Path.GetExtension(string path) takes a file path with the name –  DJ KRAZE Jan 5 '12 at 13:55
    
The file types are proprietary, and are actually part of the file name, not actually the extension at all. I just used extension as an example. But to answer your question, the file types are pulled from the list of file types in the foreach that contains the switch. –  crunchy Jan 6 '12 at 13:30
    
ok.. that makes more sense.. –  DJ KRAZE Jan 6 '12 at 15:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I tried using Roberts solution, but as I stated, I have too many different file types to set up each test case individually. The next thing I tried was setting up a TestCaseSource, but every time I ran the test for that it marked the test as ignored:

[Test, TestCaseSource(typeof(FakeDictionary), "TestFiles")]
public void Cpy_Files_ShouldCopyAllFilesInDictionary(string extension, string fielName)    {
    // Arrange
    var mockObject = MockRepository.GenerateMock<IFileSystemIO>();
    var systemUnderTest = new CopyFileToDestination(mockObject);

    // Act
    systemUnderTest.Cpy_Files(dictionary);

    // Assert
    mockObject.AssertWasCalled(f => f.Copy(extension, fileName));
}

The data source is below:

public static Dictionary<string, string> TestFiles{
    get
    {
        return new Dictionary<string, string>()
            {
                {".txt",
                "C:\\test\\test1.txt"},
                {".txt",
                "c:\\test\\test2.txt"}
            };
    }
} 

What I finally worked out uses the times to repeat option in Rhino and is really pretty simple:

[Test]
public void Cpy_Files_ShouldCopyAllFilesInDictionary(){
    // Arrange
    var mockObject = MockRepository.GenerateMock<IFileSystemIO>();
    var systemUnderTest = new CopyFileToDestination(mockObject);

    // Act
    systemUnderTest.Cpy_Files(dictionary);

    // Assert

    // I know how many objects are in my fake dictionary so I set the times to repeat as a const
    const int timesToRepeat = 2;

    // now I just set the values below. I am not testing file names so the test will ignore arguments
    mockObject.AssertWasCalled(f => f.Copy("",""), options => options.Repeat.Times(timesToRepeat).IgnoreArguments());
}

I hope this helps someone else with a similar problem.

share|improve this answer
    
Can't you just use dictionary.Count in options.Repeat.Times? I also would lean towards foreach-ing over the dictionary. That was you can actually do an assertion for each item in the dictionary individually (if you need the file names, this would be the way to go). –  Jeff Bridgman Jan 28 at 21:29
    
Yeah, I could have used dictionary.Count but I didn't think of that. My preference is to keep unit tests to as few assertions as possible so I tend to avoid using assertions inside loops. In my opinion asserting the call was made was sufficient in this case –  crunchy Jan 29 at 15:44
    
I try to follow that rule as well and consider an assertion inside a loop to still be "one assertion"... maybe I'm cheating a bit, hehe :P –  Jeff Bridgman Jan 29 at 16:56

I would try making use of the TestCase attribute:

[TestCase(".txt", "c:\test\file1.txt")]
[TestCase(".txt", "c:\test\file2.txt")]
[TestCase(".dat", "c:\test\file1.dat")]
[TestCase(".dat", "c:\test\file2.dat")]
public void Should_Copy_Text_Files(string extension, string fileName){
    var dictionary = new FakeDictionary().FakeFiles();
    var mockObject = MockRepository.GenerateMock<IFileSystemIO>();
    var systemUnderTest = new CopyFileToDestination(mockObject);

    systemUnderTest.Cpy_Files(dictionary);

    mockObject.AssertWasCalled(f => f.Copy(extension, fileName));
}

This will run the test separately for each TestCase attribute, passing the parameters it contains into the test method. That way you can test that each item in your dictionary was "copied" without using multiple asserts in the same test.

share|improve this answer
    
Unfortunately this did not work for me. The actual number of file types I have to test made setting each test case too cumbersome. –  crunchy Jan 6 '12 at 13:00

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