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I'm a beginner android developer , I was trying to run this Linear Layout in eclipse :

    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<LinearLayout xmlns:android="http://schemas.android.com/apk/res/android"
    android:orientation="vertical"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:layout_height="fill_parent">

  <LinearLayout
      android:orientation="horizontal"
      android:layout_width="fill_parent"
      android:layout_height="fill_parent"
      android:layout_weight="1">
      <TextView
          android:text="red"
          android:gravity="center_horizontal"
          android:background="#aa0000"
          android:layout_width="wrap_content"
          android:layout_height="fill_parent"
          android:layout_weight="1"/>
      <TextView
          android:text="green"
          android:gravity="center_horizontal"
          android:background="#00aa00"
          android:layout_width="wrap_content"
          android:layout_height="fill_parent"
          android:layout_weight="1"/>
      <TextView
          android:text="blue"
          android:gravity="center_horizontal"
          android:background="#0000aa"
          android:layout_width="wrap_content"
          android:layout_height="fill_parent"
          android:layout_weight="1"/>
      <TextView
          android:text="yellow"
          android:gravity="center_horizontal"
          android:background="#aaaa00"
          android:layout_width="wrap_content"
          android:layout_height="fill_parent"
          android:layout_weight="1"/>
  </LinearLayout>

  <LinearLayout
    android:orientation="vertical"
    android:layout_width="fill_parent"
    android:layout_height="fill_parent"
    android:layout_weight="1">
    <TextView
        android:text="row one"
        android:textSize="15pt"
        android:layout_width="fill_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_weight="1"/>
    <TextView
        android:text="row two"
        android:textSize="15pt"
        android:layout_width="fill_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_weight="1"/>
    <TextView
        android:text="row three"
        android:textSize="15pt"
        android:layout_width="fill_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_weight="1"/>
    <TextView
        android:text="row four"
        android:textSize="15pt"
        android:layout_width="fill_parent"
        android:layout_height="wrap_content"
        android:layout_weight="1"/>
  </LinearLayout>

</LinearLayout>

And, I noticed :
1) yellow line under android:text="Yellow"
2) yellow line under android:text="row four"
the Triangle warn says [I18N] Hardcoded string "Yellow", should use @string resource " and same for the rest of the warnings.Any suggestion?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 63 down vote accepted

It is not good practice to hard code strings into your layout files. You should add them to a string resource file and then reference them from your layout.

This allows you to update every occurrence of the word "Yellow" in all layouts at the same time by just editing your strings.xml file.

It is also extremely useful for supporting multiple languages as a separate strings.xml file can be used for each supported language.

example: XML file saved at res/values/strings.xml:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<resources>
    <string name="yellow">Yellow</string>
</resources>

This layout XML applies a string to a View:

<TextView android:layout_width="fill_parent"
          android:layout_height="wrap_content"
          android:text="@string/yellow" />

Similarly colors should be stored in colors.xml and then referenced by using @color/color_name

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<resources>
    <color name="Black">#000000</color>
</resources>
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2  
(out of scope) also, it looks like a table somehow. may be a tablelayout would be more appropriate. moreover, textsize in pt in discouraged. sp are more flexible. –  njzk2 Jan 5 '12 at 14:16
    
@kuffs : thank you, that was helpful –  user941015 Apr 17 '12 at 16:10
    
Why is it @string/... and not @strings/...? –  Con Antonakos Jul 17 '13 at 23:44
2  
You are referencing a single string. Why would it be plural? –  Kuffs Jul 18 '13 at 5:57
    
@Kuffs: If app is monolingual, and small Toasts like "Please enter value less than 100" needs to be shown, should we still follow String Resource methodology? –  Shishir Gupta Dec 8 '14 at 13:48

You must create them under strings.xml

<string name="close">Close</string>    

You must replace and reference like this

android:text="@string/close"/>

Do not use @strings even though the XML file says strings.xml or else it will not work.

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great explained –  CroiOS Jul 29 '13 at 19:41
    
@CroiOS Great English –  Henry Harris Jun 17 '14 at 15:28

It is not good practice to hard code strings into your layout files/ code. You should add them to a string resource file and then reference them from your layout.

  1. This allows you to update every occurrence of the same word in all
    layouts at the same time by just editing your strings.xml file.
  2. It is also extremely useful for supporting multiple languages as a separate strings.xml file can be used for each supported language
  3. the actual point of having the @string system please read over the localization documentation. It allows you to easily locate text in your app and later have it translated.
  4. Strings can be internationalized easily, allowing your application to support multiple languages with a single application package file (APK).

Benefits

  • Lets say you used same string in 10 different locations in the code. What if you decide to alter it? Instead of searching for where all it has been used in the project you just change it once and changes are reflected everywhere in the project.
  • Strings don’t clutter up your application code, leaving it clear and easy to maintain.
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