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I have a class structure

Class A
{
   Object of classB
   Object of classC
}

Now for this purpose I have files A.h/A.m B.h/B.m , C.h/C.m Now I have a separate file G.h which has a number of global variables which are used by all the class A,B,C Now I have imported B.h , C.h , G.h inside A.h . I also have separately imported the file G.h inside B.h and C.h

Now when build the project , I receive a link error for duplicate symbol on the global varibles (which is probably due to multiple inclusion of the file G.h) .

How can I solve this ??? The following is my code structure

//A.h

#import "B.h"
#import "C.h"
#import "G.h"

@interface A : NSObject {
  B *b;
  C *c;
}
//B.h
#import "G.h"

//C.h

#import "G.h"

//G.h
A *a=nil;
@interface G : NSObject { //whole class is empty}
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Let us see actual code –  Mark Jan 5 '12 at 13:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You should declare your globals in G.h but define them in G.m, so that they're only linked once in the target. So if, for example, you have a string constant that's globally defined, you would do:

G.h

extern NSString const *appName;

G.m

NSString const *appName = @"My Great App";

In your pasted code, it's the A instance that's being duplicated. It's imported into each other translation unit, but with the same name every time which means that the compiled objects can't be linked. Assuming you want a shared A instance called a, you'd do:

G.h

@class A;
extern A *a;

G.m

#import "A.h"
#import "G.h"

A *a = nil;
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Thanks a lot .. did make a very fundamental mistake –  ping localhost Jan 6 '12 at 10:21

Use the @class compiler directive in your class headers instead of importing the headers of the other classes. @class provides a forward declaration of a given class, so you can defer importing its header until you really need it, which is usually going to be in the corresponding .m file.

So instead of something like this:

 #import "B.h"

 @interface A : NSObject
 {
     B someObj;
 } 

...do this

 @class B;

 @interface A : NSObject
 {
     B someObj;
 } 

Now the compiler will understand that B is the name of a class, and therefore allow you to use it as a data type without importing B's header.

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