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A simple Bash variable test goes:

${varName:?    "${varName} is not defined"}

I'd like to re-use this, by putting it in a function. How please?

Following fails

#
# Test a variable exists
tvar(){
 val=${1:?    "${1}    must be defined, preferably in $basedir"}
 if [ -z ${val}  ]
     then 
     echo Zero length value 
 else
     echo ${1} exists, value ${1}
 fi
}

I.e. I need to exit if the test fails.

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7 Answers 7

Thanks to lhunath's answer, I was led to a part of the Bash man page that I've overlooked hundreds of times:

    When  not performing substring  expansion, bash tests for a parameter that
    is unset  or null; omitting the colon results in a test only for a parame‐
    ter that is unset.

This prompted me to create the following truth table:


                | unset |   set    | set and  | meaning
                |       | but null | not null |
    ============+=======+==========+==========+=============================
     ${var-_}   |   T   |     F    |    T     | not null or not set
    ------------+-------+----------+----------+-----------------------------
     ${var:-_}  |   T   |     T    |    T     | always true, use for subst.
    ------------+-------+----------+----------+-----------------------------
     $var       |   F   |     F    |    T     | var is set and not null
    ------------+-------+----------+----------+-----------------------------
     ${!var[@]} |   F   |     T    |    T     | var is set

This table introduces the specification in the last row. The Bash man page says "If name is not an array, expands to 0 if name is set and null otherwise." For purposes of this truth table, it behaves the same even if it's an array.

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Very cool, but do you know why this fails when var is an array: test "${!var[@]}" && echo 'T' || echo 'F', error message binary operator expected –  l0b0 Nov 10 '10 at 9:33
    
@l0b0: It gives me a "T" or an "F" depending on whether var is set or unset. What shell (and its version)? (This only works in Bash.) What is the contents of ${var[@]} (output of declare -p var)? –  Dennis Williamson Nov 10 '10 at 15:26
    
Bash 4.1.5(1)-release (i486-pc-linux-gnu), declare -a var='([0]="var1" [1]="var2" [2]="var3")'. See gist –  l0b0 Nov 10 '10 at 16:23
    
@l0b0: Oh, sorry, test (aka [) doesn't support the same features as [[. Try [[ ${!var[@]}" ]] && echo 'T' || echo 'F'. See also this and this. –  Dennis Williamson Nov 10 '10 at 19:27
    
@Dennis: That doesn't fail, but produces true even for unset (see gist) –  l0b0 Nov 11 '10 at 9:19

What you're looking for is indirection.

assertNotEmpty() {
    : "${!1:? "$1 is empty, aborting."}"
}

That causes the script to abort with an error message if you do something like this:

$ foo=""
$ assertNotEmpty foo
bash: !1:  foo is empty, aborting.

If you just want to test whether foo is empty, instead of aborting the script, use this instead of a function:

[[ $foo ]]

For example:

until read -p "What is your name? " name && [[ $name ]]; do
    echo "You didn't enter your name.  Please, try again." >&2
done

Also, note that there is a very important difference between an empty and an unset parameter. You should take care not to confuse these terms! An empty parameter is one that is set but just set to an empty string. An unset parameter is one that doesn't exist at all.

The previous examples all test for empty parameters. If you want to test for unset parameters and consider all set parameters OK, whether they're empty or not, use this:

[[ ! $foo && ${foo-_} ]]

Use it in a function like this:

assertIsSet() {
    [[ ! ${!1} && ${!1-_} ]] && {
        echo "$1 is not set, aborting." >&2
        exit 1
    }
}

Which only aborts the script when the parameter name you pass denotes a parameter that isn't set:

$ ( foo="blah"; assertIsSet foo; echo "Still running." )
Still running.
$ ( foo=""; assertIsSet foo; echo "Still running." )
Still running.
$ ( unset foo; assertIsSet foo; echo "Still running." )
foo is not set, aborting.
share|improve this answer
    
That's the one I want. Thanks. I should have said unset. so the function I want is assertIsSet() { [[ ! ${!1} && ${!1-_} ]] && { echo "$1 is not set, aborting." >&2 exit 1 } } Thanks. –  DaveP May 17 '09 at 13:30

This function tests for variables that ARE CURRENTLY set. The variable may even be an array. Note that in bash: 0 == TRUE, 1 == FALSE.

function var.defined {
    eval '[[ ${!'$1'[@]} ]]'
}

# Typical Usage of var.defined {}

declare you="Your Name Here" ref='you';

read -p "What's your name: " you;

if var.defined you; then   # Simple demo using literal text

    echo "BASH recognizes $you";
    echo "BASH also knows a reference to $ref as ${!ref}, by indirection."; 

fi

unset you # have just been killed by a master :D

if ! var.defined $ref; then    # Standard demo using an expanded literal value

    echo "BASH doesn't know $ref any longer";

fi

read -s -N 1 -p "Press any key to continue...";
echo "";

So to be clear here, the function tests literal text. Everytime a command is called in bash, variables are GENERALLY 'swapped-out' or 'substituted' with the underlying value unless:

  • $varRef ($) is escaped: \$varRef
  • $varRef is single quoted '$varRef'
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You want to use [ -z ${parameter+word} ]

Some part of man bash:

Parameter Expansion
    ...
    In  each  of  the cases below, word is subject to tilde expansion, parameter expansion, command substitution, and
    arithmetic expansion.  When not performing substring expansion, bash tests for a parameter that is unset or null;
    omitting the colon results in a test only for a parameter that is unset.
    ...
    ${parameter:+word}
           Use Alternate Value.  If parameter is null or unset, nothing is substituted, otherwise  the  expansion  of
           word is substituted.
    ...

in other words:

    ${parameter+word}
           Use Alternate Value.  If parameter is unset, nothing is substituted, otherwise  the  expansion  of
           word is substituted.

some examples:

$ set | grep FOOBAR
$ if [ -z "${FOOBAR+something}" ]; then echo "it is unset"; fi
it is unset
$ declare FOOBAR
$ if [ -z "${FOOBAR+something}" ]; then echo "it is unset"; fi
$ FOOBAR=
$ if [ -z "${FOOBAR+something}" ]; then echo "it is unset"; fi
$ FOOBAR=1
$ if [ -z "${FOOBAR+something}" ]; then echo "it is unset"; fi
$ unset FOOBAR
$ if [ -z "${FOOBAR+something}" ]; then echo "it is unset"; fi
it is unset
$
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I don't have understood exactly what do you need. I'm trying to replying you despite of this.

I.e. I need to exit if the test fails.

The code:

${varName:?    "${varName} is not defined"}

will return a non zero exit code when there is not a variable named "varName". The exit code of the last command is saved in $?.

About your code:

val=${1:?    "${1}    must be defined, preferably in $basedir"}

Maybe it is not doing what you need. In the case that $1 is not defined the "${1}" will be substituted with nothing. Probably you want use the single quotes that literally writes ${1} without substitution.

val=${1:?    '${1}    must be defined, preferably in $basedir'
share|improve this answer
    
I want to encapsulate the test in a function, to allow me to call it with defined SomeVariableName so that I can re-use it. –  DaveP May 17 '09 at 12:32
    
My finished function, tests for both unset and empty (belt and braces) assertIsSet2() { if [[ ! ${!1} && ${!1-_} ]] then echo "$1 is not set, aborting." >&2 exit 1 #else # echo ${1} is set, value [${1}] fi : "${!1:? "$1 is empty, aborting."}" } Thanks for the input. I'm back on track! –  DaveP May 17 '09 at 15:11

Unsure if this is exactly what you want but a handy trick I use when writing a new+complex script is to use "set -o"

set -o #will make the script bomb out when it finds an unset variable

EG:

$ grep '$1' chex.sh

case "$1" in

$ ./chex.sh

./chex.sh: line 111: $1: unbound variable

$ ./chex.sh foo

incorrect/no options passed.. exiting

share|improve this answer
    
Do you mean set -u? set -o is for setting options, like set -o pipefail (which you should also use). –  Tom Anderson Jun 30 '11 at 14:24
    
'set -u' is the same as 'set -o nounset', which was probably intended above. –  jmanning2k Aug 8 '11 at 14:44
if set | grep -q '^VARIABLE='
then 
    echo VARIABLE is set
fi
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