Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a couple of functions that loop around the surrounding cells of a cell. The grid is contained inside an array.

In my code, I have checks to make sure it's not one of the edge cells, as checking an undefined cell causes an error.

As such, I have code like this:

if(x > 0) {
    var firstX = x - 1;
} else {
    var firstX = x;
}
if(x < 199) {
    var lastX = x + 1;
} else {
    var lastX = x;
}

if(y > 0) {
    var firstY = y - 1;
} else {
    var firstY = y;
}
if(y < 199) {
    var lastY = y + 1;
} else {
    var lastY = y;
}

A lot of lines of code to do very little. Is there a more elegant way to do this?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You can use the conditional operator:

var firstX = x > 0 ? x - 1 : x;
var lastX = x < 199 ? x + 1 : x;
var firstY = y > 0 ? y - 1 : y;
var lastY = y < 199 ? y + 1 : y;

You could remove the redundancy by writing a function to calculate "first" given a value, and a similar one for "last" - but I think that would be overkill in this case.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I know there was something simple I was overlooking. –  Macha May 17 '09 at 11:50

Or more clearly:

var firstX = Math.max(x - 1, 0);
var lastX = Math.min(x + 1, 199);
var firstY = Math.max(y - 1, 0);
var lastY = Math.min(y + 1, 199);
share|improve this answer
    
That's assuming that x and y are in the range [0, 199]. That may well be the case, but it's an assumption. (Consider x = -10: the original code would make firstX= -9, yours would give 0.) Other than that, I like it though. –  Jon Skeet May 17 '09 at 12:09
    
Well if x or y < 0 or > 199, something's gone wrong elsewhere in the code, as under normal circumstances, x and y should be between 0 and 199. –  Macha May 17 '09 at 12:11

You can use the conditional operator:

var firstX = x - (x > 0 ? 1:0);
var lastX = x + (x < 199 ? 1:0);
var firstY = y - (y > 0 ? 1:0);
var lastY = y + (y < 199 ? 1:0);

Edit:
Offered an alternative way of using it, as Jon already posted "my" code. ;)

Edit 2:
As Rafael pointed out, the condition can be implicitly converted into a number, so the conditional operator is not needed:

var firstX = x - (x > 0);
var lastX = x + (x < 199);
var firstY = y - (y > 0);
var lastY = y + (y < 199);

However, it's less obvious what this code actually does. From my tests it seems that Javascript consistently uses the value 1 for true, but across programming languages the value -1 is just as commonly used.

share|improve this answer
    
the ternary operator isn't needed. You can just write var firstX = x - (x > 0) JS will automatically convert the boolean value to Number –  Rafael May 17 '09 at 12:01
    
@Rafael: I'd say that's less readable than using a conditional though. –  Jon Skeet May 17 '09 at 12:08
    
@Jon Skeet: yes, it is less readable, but it's more compact and we use features of the javascript language. Logical true is being converted to 1 (number value) and false to 0. –  Rafael May 17 '09 at 12:30

Use the variables that you check(x and y) instead of First/lastX and First/lastY

if(x > 0 && x < 199) x-=1;
else if(x > 0) x+=1;

if(y > 0 && y < 199) y-=1;
else if(y > 0) y +=1;

Just check x and y after that. :)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.