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I am using following code to get date in "dd/MM/yyyy HH:mm:ss.SS" format.

    import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
    import java.util.Calendar;
    import java.util.Date;

    public class DateAndTime{

    public static void main(String[] args)throws Exception{

    Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
    SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy HH:mm:ss.SS");
    String strDate = sdf.format(cal.getTime());
    System.out.println("Current date in String Format: "+strDate);

    SimpleDateFormat sdf1 = new SimpleDateFormat();
    sdf1.applyPattern("dd/MM/yyyy HH:mm:ss.SS");
    Date date = sdf1.parse(strDate);
    System.out.println("Current date in Date Format: "+date);

}
}

and am getting following output

    Current date in String Format: 05/01/2012 21:10:17.287
    Current date in Date Format: Thu Jan 05 21:10:17 IST 2012

Kindly suggest what i should do to display the date in same string format(dd/MM/yyyy HH:mm:ss.SS) i.e i want following output:

    Current date in String Format: 05/01/2012 21:10:17.287
    Current date in Date Format: 05/01/2012 21:10:17.287

Kindly suggest

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1  
when you System.out.println a date object, the Date's toString Method is called. You would need to create your own subclass of Date and overwrite the toString method to output the Date the way you want it to. –  Robert M. Jan 5 '12 at 15:50
1  
It's really unclear what you want, but understand this: Date.toString() returns the default format, nothing can be done about it. You have to use SimpleDateFormat to format the string output. –  Viruzzo Jan 5 '12 at 15:51
    
Do you mean .SSS for milli-seconds? Java doesn't support 1/100ths of a second. If you use .SS it many not behave as you expect. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 5 '12 at 16:02

5 Answers 5

You can't - because you're calling Date.toString() which will always include the system time zone if that's in the default date format for the default locale. The Date value itself has no concept of a format. If you want to format it in a particular way, use SimpleDateFormat.format()... using Date.toString() is almost always a bad idea.

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The following code gives expected output. Is that you want?

import java.util.Calendar;
import java.util.Date;

public class DateAndTime {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        Calendar cal = Calendar.getInstance();
        SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/yyyy HH:mm:ss.SS");
        String strDate = sdf.format(cal.getTime());
        System.out.println("Current date in String Format: " + strDate);

        SimpleDateFormat sdf1 = new SimpleDateFormat();
        sdf1.applyPattern("dd/MM/yyyy HH:mm:ss.SS");
        Date date = sdf1.parse(strDate);
        String string=sdf1.format(date);
        System.out.println("Current date in Date Format: " + string);

    }
}
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SimpleDateFormat

sdf=new SimpleDateFormat("dd/MM/YYYY hh:mm:ss");
String dateString=sdf.format(date);

It will give the output 28/09/2013 09:57:19 as you expected.

For complete program click here

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Use:

 System.out.println("Current date in Date Format: " + sdf.format(date));
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The output in your first printline is using your formatter. The output in your second (the date created from your parsed string) is output using Date#toString which formats according to its own rules. That is, you're not using a formatter.

The rules are as per what you're seeing and described here: http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/util/Date.html#toString()

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