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On Windows 7 and 8 it runs fine. However, when running in XCode 4 I get EXC_BAD_ACCESS on the second iteration when someone loads a map (select "Load Map" from title).

You can download the source with the XCode project

#include <string>
#include <map>
#include <iostream>

std::map <std::string, std::string> info;    

std::string* get_key_val( std::string* line )
{
    std::string key_val[2];
    int start, end;

    start = line->find_first_not_of( " " );
    end = line->find_last_of( ":" );
    if( start == -1 )
    {
        return NULL;
    }
    else if( end == -1 )
    {
        return NULL;
    }
    else
    {
        key_val[0] = line->substr( start, end - start );
    }

    start = line->find_first_not_of(" ", end + 1);
    end = line->find_last_of( " \n\r" );
    if( start == -1 )
    {
        return NULL;
    }
    else if( end == -1 )
    {
        return NULL;
    }
    else
    {
        key_val[1] = line->substr( start, end - start );
    }

    return key_val;
}


void parse_from_line( std::string* line )
{
    std::string* keyv = get_key_val( line );
    if( keyv[0].empty() == false && keyv[1].empty() == false ) info[ keyv[0] ] = keyv[1];
}

int main( int argc, char* args[] )
{
    std::string line = "name: Foo";
    parse_from_line( &line );
    std::cout << "Hello " << info["name"].c_str();
}
share|improve this question
    
Is there a simpler example of this problem? You're asking people to do a lot of reading and research. (You might also solve the problem in the process) –  Drew Dormann Jan 5 '12 at 17:10
    
Mat: Yes, I linked to it with the lines, should have copied the code, sorry. DrewDormann and Sam Miller: I had been trying, but was unable to reproduce it. Though I think it's because I was doing everything in main versus adding another function, would have been easy to recreate now that I know the problem, I'll go ahead and add an edit above for future viewers. –  Mohammad El-Abid Jan 5 '12 at 22:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your get_key_val function starts like this:

std::string* Map::get_key_val( std::string* line )
{
  std::string key_val[2];

It ends like this:

  return key_val;
}

You're returning a pointer to a stack variable. The key_val variable ceases to exist upon return from the function, so you have an invalid pointer, and the two string values in the array get destroyed. Subsequent behavior is undefined.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I remember considering this but think I got too frustrated and forgot. Now what I'm doing is void Map::get_key_val( std::string* line, std::string* key, std::string* value ); is that the "proper" way to go about it? –  Mohammad El-Abid Jan 5 '12 at 22:35
    
That could work. I'd pass those parameters by reference instead of by pointer, though: void Map::get_key_val(std::string const& line, std::string& key, std::string& value). –  Rob Kennedy Jan 6 '12 at 16:56

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