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I just started to write a Class Library in C# that will implement Gets, Posts (Http Requests of Post and Gets) and oAuth (Authentication method using tokens logic).

Currently, every aplication me and my colleagues write have its own "HttpMethods" class that is responsible for executing Gets and Posts.

Here is a quick Example of a Get That we have :

 public string Get(string url, string refererPage = "")
    {
        string response = null;

        try
        {
            // Web request
            HttpWebRequest request               = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create(url);
            request.Timeout                      = m_timeout;
            request.Method                       = "GET";
            request.Referer                      = refererPage;
            request.CookieContainer              = m_CookieJar;
            request.Accept                       = "text/html,application/xhtml+xml,application/xml;q=0.9,*/*;q=0.8";
            request.ServicePoint.ConnectionLimit = Consts.CONNECTIONS_LIMIT;
            request.UserAgent                    = Consts.URI_USER_AGENT;
            request.AllowAutoRedirect            = true;
            request.Host                         = Consts.API_HOST;

            // Web response
            using (HttpWebResponse resp = (HttpWebResponse)request.GetResponse())
                response = new StreamReader(resp.GetResponseStream()).ReadToEnd();
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            LogWriter.Error(ex);
        }

        return response;   
    }

My question is : Which will be the best approach for us to addopt ? We want to have our own lib that will use the HttpWebRequest object,ending to something just like this:

MyOwnDll.MyOwnClassResponsibleForWebRequests.Get (Parameters)

Same for a Post Method.

What should i do ?

Thanks in advance

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2  
Not sure what you are asking, you seem to know what you need to do. Do you need help making the library or writing the implementation of get? Anyway, when I did this I used socket so I had a little more control, so if you are going to go through the effort, I suggest extending socket. But if you are using .net 3.5+ you can just use extension methods which might be easier for what you are trying to do. –  bebonham Jan 5 '12 at 17:22
    
I will not use .NET. This will be used in desktop c# applications. I need help to figure out how should i build the "Get" method for example. –  Marcello Grechi Lins Jan 5 '12 at 17:26
    
What advice are you looking for? All you are doing is writing your own custom wrapper class around an existing one. There really isn't any more to it that to implement it how you need it. –  cdeszaq Jan 5 '12 at 17:27
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1 Answer

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think you should follow Factory Pattern.

Something like this:

public class MyOwnClassResponsibleForWebRequests
{
   private MyOwnClassResponsibleForWebRequests(){}

   public HttpRequest Get(Params)
   {
      HttpRequestobj hr = new HttpRequest();
      .....your code
      return hr; //or make request and return result
   }
}

or you can make the request itself and return the result instead of HttpRequest object.

share|improve this answer
    
Using an object to build what ? Sorry i missed it... –  Marcello Grechi Lins Jan 5 '12 at 17:23
    
@MarcelloGrechiLins check out my edit. –  Alex Dn Jan 5 '12 at 17:28
    
Oh, i guess i wasn't that clear, im sorry. by "GET" Method, i meant a HTTPGET, not a Get like "Getters and Setters". Got it ? –  Marcello Grechi Lins Jan 5 '12 at 17:30
    
@MarcelloGrechiLins Yes of course i understand :) in place of "...your code" you do HttpRequest hr = new HttpRequest(); return hr; or HttpResponse hresp = hr.GetResponse(). and i will fix the answer some cause i meant a little bit something else :) –  Alex Dn Jan 5 '12 at 17:33
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