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I have a simple class. And I have to add some conditions to some methods and properties. For example:

public class Example
{
  public Boolean Condition {get; set;}
  public Double ConditionValue {get; set;}

  [Verify("!Condition && ConditionValue>5")]
  public void DoSomthing()
  { ... }
}

I want to check the condition (for example, "!Condition && ConditionValue>5") in an aspect attribute. I can not give an action/func into an attribute so I give a simple string. And I need to translate this string into a condition:

[Serializable]
public class MyAspectAttribute : OnMethodBoundaryAspect
{
    public override void OnExit(MethodExecutionArgs args)
    {
        if (!this.Condition && this.ConditionValue>5) // If-statment from string, this is the problem...
        { ... }
    }
}  

How I can extract real if-statment from string? I see some solutions, but I'm not sure they fine:

  1. Use a runtime compiler, e.g. CSharpCodeProvider.
  2. Use a library such as http://flee.codeplex.com/
  3. Somthing else...?

How I can do it gracefully? Thanks!

Upd: I have edited the question on the advices... Upd2: I don't try to verification my code, I can do this:

public class Example2
    {
      public Boolean Condition {get; set;}

      [LoggingIf("Condition")]
      public void DoSomthing1()
      { ... }

      [PrintReportIf("!Condition")]
      public void DoSomthing2()
      { ... }
    }
share|improve this question
    
What have you tried? Why didn't it work? – McKay Jan 5 '12 at 18:36
    
Why custom attributes in this case? – p.campbell Jan 5 '12 at 18:38
    
I try to add some logic to class members. It is works, but I'm looking for a fine solution... And how I can add some logic to much(!) properties and methods without attributes..? – DragonFire Jan 5 '12 at 18:38
1  
What do you expect will invoke your code once you have it in an attribute? Attributes don't know anything about the members they decorate and nothing 'invokes' attributes. They only specify metadata. – M.Babcock Jan 5 '12 at 18:40
    
Postsharp can use this metadata in different ways... =) One way - insert this string as an if-statement(?) into method body... – DragonFire Jan 5 '12 at 18:42
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Considered using lambda expressions parser? You should be able to do something along the lines:

[Verify("(Example e) => !e.Condition && e.Condition > 5")]
public void DoSomthing() 
{ ... }

And compile that later using:

[Serializable]
public class MyAspectAttribute : OnMethodBoundaryAspect
{
    public override void OnExit(MethodExecutionArgs args)
    {
         ExprParser parser = new ExprParser();
         LambdaExpression lambda = parser.Parse(/* Verify string comes here */);
         bool isConditionMet = (bool) parser.Run(lambda, this);

         if (isConditionMet)
         { ... }
    }
}

Edit:

For custom user types, you need to provide namespace (and assembly if type resides in different assembly than the one you call parser from):

ExprParser.Using.Add("PersonTypeNamespace");
ExprParser parser = new ExprParser();
LambdaExpression lambda = parser.Parse("(Person p) => p.Name");
var output = parser.Run(lambda, new Person { Name = "DragonFire" });

In download section there's User guide file - it provides some extra information on library usage.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for lambda parser, but I still think he should avoid magic strings for conditions. – DustinDavis Jan 5 '12 at 21:17
    
Yes, this is what I was looking for!! Thanks!! – DragonFire Jan 6 '12 at 12:13
    
I try to use it, but i have an exception: "Unexpected end" when I'm parsing "(e) => e.Condition" string... – DragonFire Jan 7 '12 at 9:26
    
@DragonFire: you need to add namespaces/assemblies names - check my edit. And actually use full lambda notation, eg. (Example e) => ... – jimmy_keen Jan 7 '12 at 10:47

Create a set of objects that implements Boolean logic.

  • Equals Comparator (takes the name of a property and a value)
  • Greater Than Comparator (takes the name of a property and a value)
  • And Comparator (takes two comparators)
  • Boolean Evaluator (take the name of a boolean property)
  • etc, etc

Then have your attribute take one of these objects as a parameter

[Verify(new AndComparator(
    new BooleanEvaluator ("Condition"), 
    new GreaterThanComparator("ConditionValue", 5)))]
public void DoSomthing()
share|improve this answer
    
I can't do this, becouse I can use nested properties, for example: [Verify("CurrentInfo.User.Account.IsValid")] – DragonFire Jan 5 '12 at 19:01
    
@DragonFire Sure you can, you just need something like Spring's Expression Evaluation; i.e. You walk the string reflectioning as you go. Also, cool user name. – C. Ross Jan 5 '12 at 19:34

Take a look at Code Contracts: http://research.microsoft.com/en-us/projects/contracts/ If having custom attributes is not a must, they may be just what you are looking for.

Code Contracts are good at defining constraints on permissable parameter and return values of methods and optionally checking them at run-time (and even compile time, though it really slows down the IDE)

share|improve this answer
    
I know about contracts, but my task doesn't linked to the software verification... – DragonFire Jan 5 '12 at 19:07

You already know the formula you want to use so just pass in the values to the aspect.

public class MyValidationAspect : OnMethodBoundaryAspect
{

public int Val1 { get; set; }
public int Val2 { get; set; }

public override void OnExit(MethodExecutionArgs args) 
    { 
        if (this.args.Arguments[0] > Val1) // If-statment from string, this is the problem... 
        { ... } 
    } 


}

[MyValidationAspect(Val1 = 5, Val2 = ...)]

Do not try to be so generic/dynamic just make a set of concrete aspects and pass in the values as needed.

Or, you can use Rosylen (Compiler as a Service).

share|improve this answer
    
I have to use different complex conditions... But Rosylen... It is very interesting!! – DragonFire Jan 5 '12 at 19:15
    
@DragonFire Make more than one aspect. Trying to do it so dynamically is not going to get you anything but problems. I can't see a use case where the conditions would change dynamically. You're either doing it wrong or are working very hard at being lazy. – DustinDavis Jan 5 '12 at 19:19

Why not doing something like this:

public class Example
{
  public Boolean Condition {get; set;}
  public Double ConditionValue {get; set;}


  public void DoSomthing()
  { 
           Verify.That(!Condition && ConditionValue>5);
           ...
  }
}

It's almost the same amount of code, it will be compiled and validated in compile time, you will be able to put things in configuration, verify private members and do complex verifications.

share|improve this answer
    
He's looking to use AOP to write the conditions for him. – M.Babcock Jan 5 '12 at 18:51
    
but he already wrote the condition in the string. – ivowiblo Jan 5 '12 at 18:52
1  
You are correct, and that is one of the many issues about what he is trying to do. – M.Babcock Jan 5 '12 at 18:53
1  
@jp2code - Aspect Oriented Programming. PostSharp is just one of the AOP toolkits available for .NET. – M.Babcock Jan 5 '12 at 19:01
2  
But putting it in a string is not automating it... – ivowiblo Jan 5 '12 at 19:29

One technique, which will make debugging difficult, would be to use #define values.

For example, in some other project, you could declare CONDITION_5 as:

#define CONDITION_5

Now, in the example class below, DoSomething() is visible.

public class Example
{

#if CONDITION_5
  public void DoSomthing()
  { ... }
#endif
}

If you need these to be variables for your code, you could define public variables in a separate class to store your selections:

public static class Global {
  public static bool Condition_5 = true;
}

Now, in the example class below, DoSomething() is always visible, but nothing executes unless you set the value.

public class Example
{

  public void DoSomthing()
  {
    if (Global.Condition_5)
    {
      // do stuff
    }
  }
}

Like you, though, I would like to see a more elegant method.

EDIT:

The OP modified his original question, as I note in my first comment. My answer was suited to the original question, not the question that was given the marked answer.

share|improve this answer
    
OK, lots of comments since I started writing this answer. It may not be what you are looking for, but I will leave it here for a bit to be sure. – jp2code Jan 5 '12 at 18:55
    
??? #if CONDITION_5 is something that will be executed at compile time and the method will never exist (or will always exist). It makes no sense. – ivowiblo Jan 5 '12 at 18:58
    
I have edited my question and specified my issue... – DragonFire Jan 5 '12 at 19:03
    
@ivowiblo: DragonFire has modified his original question and I made not of this in my first comment. My answer was relevant to the original question and certainly not warrant for your downvote. – jp2code Jan 6 '12 at 14:47
    
oh! please add that to the answer instead of a comment so I can vote it up. – ivowiblo Jan 6 '12 at 14:54

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