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Understanding std::set.insert & std::vector behavior. Please consider the following scenario:

A.h

class A {
  uint id;
  vector<double> values;
  operator<(const A& argA) const;
}

A.cpp

A::A(uint argId, vector<double> argValues) {
    this->id = argId;
    this->values = argValues;
}

A::operator<(const A& argA) const {
    // it's guaranteed that there's always at least one element in the vector
    return this->values[0] < argA.values[0];
}

B.cpp

std::set<A> mySet;
for (uint i = 0; i < (uint) 10; i++)
{
  vector<double> tempVector(3);
  for (uint j = 0; j < (uint) 3; j++) {
    tempVector[j] = j;
  }

  myset.insert(A(i + 1, tempVector));
}

In my understanding, tempElement owns a deep copied vector (values), because the vector was passed by value in its constructor and assigned. Therefore looping over i shouldn't break the added elements to my set. BUT inserting *tempElement breaks - SIGSEV. In my logic this should work... Every help appreciated!

EDIT: the code crashes during the insertion process (second element); set invokes the LT-operator, tries to access the vector of the passed argument - but cannot. Before the creation of A where I pass the id and the vector I check if the passed vector contains the right elements.

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4  
Why do you allocate tempElement dynamically? You have a memory leak in your code in the manner it is written(tempElement does not get deleted). You can do all in one line like so: myset.insert(A(i+1, tempVector)); –  Ivaylo Strandjev Jan 5 '12 at 18:56
1  
what is tempComponents? –  Zac Jan 5 '12 at 18:58
3  
@Eric: No, it doesn't. The object that you put into your set is a copy of the object you dynamically allocated. The dynamically allocated object itself is lost. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 5 '12 at 18:59
4  
You're not showing us your real code. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jan 5 '12 at 18:59
1  
Please post a small compilable example (and there doesn't look to be a need for multiple files). As posted, class A can't be used with a std::set because there's no comparison capability for A objects (i.e., there's no operator<() for A). You should get a compile error long before you have a chance for a SIGSEGV. –  Michael Burr Jan 5 '12 at 19:00

4 Answers 4

For a small vector it shouldn't matter, but if you have a large array and it will be expensive to keep copying it, yourA should contain some kind of pointer that shallow-copies. There are several options:

  1. boost::shared_array<double>
  2. boost::shared_ptr<vector<double> >
  3. boost::shared_ptr<double> but with array deleter passed in on construction.
  4. Make A non-copyable and have a set of (shared) pointers to A with some comparison functor that compares what is in the pointers rather than the pointers themselves.

Note that with either shared_array or shared_ptr you won't be able to extract the size (number of elements) so you would have to store that separately.

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std::shared_ptr<> is also available since C++11. –  user142019 Jan 5 '12 at 19:02
2  
@WTP C++11 also supports move semantics, which (if the code is rewritten correctly) should eliminate all of the extra copies. –  James Kanze Jan 5 '12 at 19:13

I don't think the problem is in this code. However I notice you have a vector tempVector but you assing the values to tempComponents instead. I can't see tempComponents declaration but my guess is it is of different size.

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tempComponents has been removed from the question. Apperently a copy-paste error. –  Mooing Duck Jan 5 '12 at 20:15

Working code with numerous changes - but I don't see the problem that you were describing.

#include <set>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

typedef unsigned int uint;

class A {
public:
  A(uint argId, vector<double> argValues) 
  {
    this->id = argId;
    this->values = argValues;
  }

  bool operator < ( A const& a ) const 
  { 
    return a.id < id;
  }

  uint id;
  vector<double> values;
};


int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{

  std::set<A> mySet;
  for (uint i = 0; i < (uint) 10; i++)
  {
    vector<double> tempVector(3);
    for (uint j = 0; j < (uint) 3; j++) {
      tempVector[j] = j;
    }

    std::unique_ptr<A> tempElement(new A(i + 1, tempVector));
    mySet.insert(*tempElement);
  }

  return 0;
}
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Thank you for your effort, @Zac. I'm using another version that doesn't support std::unique_ptr syntax. –  Eric Jan 6 '12 at 9:19

No, there's no reason for inserting into myset here to cause a crash. The problem must lie elsewhere. Perhaps in A's copy ctor if you're not using the default one.

However your code is leaking memory. When you insert into the set *tempElement is copied into the set, and then the original that you allocated with new is no longer used but is never deleted. Instead you could just do A tempElement(i+1,tempVector); so that after the object is copied into the set it gets properly destroyed. Or perhaps better in this case you could just construct it as a temporary passed directly to insert: myset.insert(A(i+1,tempVector)) in which case the object will be moved instead of copied, reducing the overhead. Or you could just construct the object in place to avoid even moving: myset.emplace(i+1,tempVector);

Also I'm assuming that by tempComponents[j] = j; you meant tempVector[j] = j. You could replace that loop with std::iota(begin(tempVector),end(tempVector),0). edit: or you could use the new initializer syntax Furthermore, since the vector is the same everytime you could use just one outside the loop:

vector<double> tempVector(3) = {0.0,1.0,2.0}
std::set<A> mySet;
for (uint i = 0; i < (uint) 10; i++)
{
  myset.emplace(i+1,tempVector);
}

C++03 compilers won't support emplace or the new initializer syntax, and iota would be a compiler extension for them (it's from the original SGI STL, so some may have it). For those you would still use insert and use a for loop to initialize tempVector or use an array:

double tempVector_init[] = {0.0,1.0,2.0};
vector<double> tempVector(tempVector_init,tempVector_init+3);
std::set<A> mySet;
for (uint i = 0; i < (uint) 10; i++)
{
  myset.insert(A(i+1,tempVector));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you @bames54, but I'm using an older version that doesn't support this syntax. –  Eric Jan 6 '12 at 9:16
    
@Eric you can still do insert(A(i+1,tempVector) if emplace is not supported and you will at least get the benefit of move semantics as soon as it's available without further changes to the code. I'll add a version of my sample code for C++03 compilers. –  bames53 Jan 6 '12 at 13:08

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