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So I'm trying to create a global context variable in one of my libraries, but can't seem to figure out how to make the variable stick. Below is a sample of my code:

class test{
    function tester(){
        echo context::getContext();
        echo '<br />';
        context::setContext(2);
        echo context::getContext();
        echo '<br />';
        new test2();
    }
}
class test2{
    public function __construct(){
        echo context::getContext();
    }
}
class context{
    protected static $contextNum = 0;
    public function getContext(){
        return isset($this->contextNum) ? $this->contextNum : 0;
    }
    public function setContext($num){
        $this->contextNum = $num;
    }
}

This ends up echoing:

0
2
0

How can I make it so that it echoes out?

0
2
2

Thanks in advance

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Change

$this->contextNum = $num;
// and
return isset($this->contextNum) ? $this->contextNum : 0;

to

self::$contextNum = $num;
// and
return isset(self::$contextNum) ? self::$contextNum : 0;

Use static modifiers for methods setContext() and getContext()

Also I would advise you to add throw new Exception('Can\'t create instance of this class') to __construct() method of context.

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I actually have a construct for the context class, it just wasn't pertinent in this example hence I didn't include it. Would there be a reason to not allow the instanciation of a contextual class? –  Aram Papazian Jan 5 '12 at 19:04
    
Oh, I though you want, make it all static... then ignore advise about set static modifiers to methods, and about construct... –  devdRew Jan 5 '12 at 19:05
    
would there be any benefit to making the methods static in this case considering that the variable itself is static? –  Aram Papazian Jan 5 '12 at 19:07
    
If you need to use instances of class context, and call this method from there - you shouldn't place static, otherwise, in order to restrict access by only static (it's more "gracefully") and to show that methods are modifying static props you should place static keyword. –  devdRew Jan 5 '12 at 19:10

Try this:

class context(){
    protected static $contextNum = 0;
    public function getContext(){
        return isset(self::$contextNum) ? self::$contextNum : 0;
    }
    public function setContext($num){
        self::$contextNum = $num;
    }
}

$this->contextNum is used to access contextNum as an instance variable (i.e. one that exists on an instance of the class context), while self::$contextNum is used to access it as a static variable.

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